“The Bizarre World Of Frank Zappa” Hologram Tour Releases New Promo Video [Watch]

first_img“The Bizarre World Of Frank Zappa” is set to launch in 2019 with a Frank Zappa hologram, alongside members of the Mothers of Invention. The hologram was created by Eyellusion, the company behind a hologram of Ronnie James Dio that embarked on a world tour last year, and will serve as the centerpiece to a performance full of “hours of never-before-seen (or heard) Zappa performance footage from the early seventies.” The press release promises that exact details about the “can’t miss” concert spectacle will be announced soon.A number of Zappa’s old bandmates–such as Napoleon Murphy Brock and Ian Underwood of the Mothers—will make guest appearances during stops on the tour. Joe’s Garage alumni Warren Cuccurullo, Arthur Barrow, Vinnie Colaiuta, and Ed Mann are also slated to appear during the tour. The guest artists will perform with a regularly touring band that includes guitarists Ray White and Mike Keneally, bassist Scott Thunes, multi-instrumentalist Robert Martin, and drummer/Zappa archivist Joe “Vaultmeister” Travers. The “Bizarre World of Frank Zappa” tour is approved and organized by the Zappa Family Trust. Ahmet Zappa, a co-trustee and the trust’s executive vice president of business development, released a statement on the tour that reads:The development of the ‘Bizarre World’ has been a herculean undertaking and an extremely emotional journey for me. “Weirdly, it’s also been one of the most creatively satisfying projects that I have ever had the privilege of working on. It’s fascinating to me how into holograms my dad was and it’s unbelievable that we have Frank in his own words talking about it (click here to hear more). The fact that we’re now finally able to technologically bring to life the ideas and concepts my father talked about so many years ago is astonishing. People’s minds, eyes and ears will be stunned by the crazy amounts of awesomeness they’ll be exposed to every night on this tour. For the first time in a long time Zappa fans will get to see and hear brand spanking new music performed by Frank with his live band and enjoy never before heard versions of their favorite songs, all while brain-melting visuals make them laugh, smile, and perhaps even cry. I truly can’t wait to share this epic experience with everyone and I’m thrilled that we’ll be doing 100 + dates around the world. So please fasten your concert-going seatbelts because things in the Zappa universe are about to get even more bizarre!!!Check out the promotional video, which includes audio of Frank Zappa speaking out about Holograms, below:“The Bizarre World Of Frank Zappa – Coming 2019”[Video: Frank Zappa]last_img read more

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VCE and VMware™: Managing The SDDC Together

first_imgWith so much talk around the unveiling of VMware NSX and Cisco’s Application Centric Infrastructure, network virtualization is certainly having it’s day in the enterprise sun, and rightfully so. The introduction of application-based policy into the physical and virtual networks that support enterprise workloads is an exciting thing.But networks aren’t the only part of the infrastructure that is benefiting from the focus that “software defined” is bringing to the architectural and operational disciplines used in the enterprise. As we see the evolution of the abstraction point between the control and data planes in every part of the infrastructure, the tools and processes needed to manage things on a day-to-day basis are evolving too. VCE and VMware have done a significant amount of joint development work, and together we are excited to examine the possibilities where a fully API-accessible, multi-vendor converged infrastructure overlaps with market-leading management, monitoring, analytics, orchestration and logging tools.The key to all of the integration that VCE does with VMware and all of our ITSM partners is the VCE Vision Intelligent Operations software. Being able to provide a holistic API that provides visibility and context to all of the individual components within a Vblock, and using that collected dataset to intelligently inform any and all upstream tools is a key part of our strategy. As we transition from inbound visibility to coordinated management, discovery and compliance, that API layer will only become more and more valuable. With so much of the cost of a hardware platform contained in the day-to-day management and operations, anything that can provide that context and programmatic access to individual hardware components is going to be valuable, and the VCE Vision API and developer community will continue VCE’s commitment to being more than the sum of the components alone.There are a number of places where this joint development and strategic alignment are visible, but none more so than in the VCE Vision™ Plugin for VMware vCenter. Across enterprises of all sizes, vCenter sits at the core of the day-to-day operation of a virtualized infrastructure. As such, it’s a perfect place to be able to integrate the visibility and status of the infrastructure itself into the traditional virtualization objects like Data Centers, Clusters and Resource Pools. Giving native access to the individual element managers is valuable, but being able to leverage the VCE Vision™ System Library for Vblock Systems to give vCenter administrators access to the Discovery, Identification, Validation, Health and Logging functions native to the VCE Vision software provides more of the visibility needed in today’s enterprise.On the trending and analytics side, the VCE Vision™ Adapter for VMware vCenter Operations Manager has brought the same context and hardware visibility into another fantastic tool. With VCE being able to OEM vCenter Operations Manager and include the plugin, which again leverages the VCE Vision API directly, customers can take something which was perfect for infrastructure virtualized with vSphere and make it even more operationally valuable. Earlier in the month, VMware announced VMware vCenter Log Insight. Log Insight provides real-time insights from log data produced by applications, physical hardware and virtualized infrastructure helping to minimize troubleshooting times as well as improve operational efficiency. VMware announced the availability of “content packs” to capture logs from a number of products, including VCE Vision Intelligent Operations software, which is available directly from the VMware Solution Exchange marketplace. Interestingly, the value of the VCE Vision API is readily apparent here as well, as VCE is the only company out of the nine released at launch that does more than plug into a single element manager. While being able to integrate one component at a time is a good first step, being able to address the entire infrastructure that is supporting your workloads at once is far more efficient and valuable.Finally, we continue to see more and more customers adopting vCloud Director as their customer provisioning portal of choice, and VCE continues to help customers and VMware both understand the strengths and potential of that product. Our document Designing VMware vCloud Director On Vblock™ Systems continues to help provide best practices and architectural guidelines for how to create an enterprise-class ITaaS implementation.As VMware’s vision of SDDC becomes clearer, the emphasis on tools and operational process to maximize the return on this fundamental change will become stronger and stronger. VCE and VMware are committed to leading this charge together.last_img read more

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Couples share ‘Ring by Spring’ stories

first_imgDominique DeMoe Spring has sprung at Notre Dame — in more ways than one. March 5, the day engaged students and alumni can reserve the Basilica of the Sacred Heart for their 2019 wedding dates, has come and gone in glorious Irish fashion. It is no secret that the population of lovebirds rivals that of our squirrels on campus, and this year has brought in a new wave of couples keeping the spirit of “ring by spring” alive and well.Here are just a few profiles of the Notre Dame students preparing to say “I do” and “yes to the dress” to their chain and ball by fall.A pair with chemistry and physics: Lizett Pink and Andrew SpitzerSeniors Lizett Pink and Andrew Spitzer have been inseparable since meeting in their physics lab freshman year. They started out as best friends, as Lizett recalls.  “First semester sophomore year at formal, Andrew was slightly intoxicated and started telling random people that we were getting married,” she said. “We were not dating at the time. So after he would say it, I would vehemently tell people that that was absolutely not happening.”After a spontaneous kiss from Andrew during their sophomore year, the pair became a couple. Since, they’ve created memories in South Bend together with a “date night jar” full of popsicle sticks with activities and restaurants written on them.When asked how he proposed, Andrew said, “Think of the most cliche Notre Dame proposal ever.”After getting down on one knee at the grotto, Lizett said yes. The couple will marry next summer at the Basilica and move to Chicago, where Andrew will attend law school at Northwestern University to become a patent lawyer and Lizett will begin a consulting career at West Monroe Partners.Highschool “Hun-nies”: Cam Kormylo and Maddy McTernanJuniors Cam Kormylo and Maddy McTernan met on the very first day of high school, and will be returning to Kenosha, Wisconsin, to be the third generation of Cam’s family to get married in their church back home.“He may not believe me, but I knew there was something special about him the moment I saw him,” Maddy said. Cam said he also knew Maddy was the one early on, when he discovered that she found the movie “Step Brothers” funny.When asked if they had nicknames for each other, Maddy said one developed through their text messages.“I used to call him Attila the Hun because every time I sent a text message calling him ‘hun,’ it would auto-correct to ‘Hun,’” she said.Cam proposed to Maddy last August during a trip to South Haven, Michigan, with another couple. He asked their friends to suggest it as a guise for Cam to plan the entire trip. After a day of “kayaking, going on long walks and eating amazing food,” Cam got down on one knee at the end of the pier as the sun set and Maddy said yes in a tear-filled moment of joy.At 16 years old, Cam told Maddy that he wanted to marry her and in June 2019 — a month after Cam graduates from Notre Dame and Maddy from Saint Mary’s — he will get his wish.My John Sun and star: Hanna Kreiner and John SunSeniors Hannah Kreiner and John Sun have come a long way since meeting through a mutual friend freshman year. They began dating sophomore year after studying together for their Organic Chemistry II class, and it quickly became apparent that their relationship would last.“I knew she was the one around two months in,” John said. “Each snowflake took its time falling, coasting downwards slowly in wavy paths, like you see in the Christmas movies. We were sitting in my room and I turned on Christmas music. It’s really cheesy, but I felt a deep sense of warmth and belonging that I had never felt before in my life. I knew at that moment that I wanted to be with her forever.”John asked Hannah to be his wife with a heartfelt Christmas Day proposal.“After the whole family was done opening presents, he brought this huge present over to me and told me he actually had one more gift,” Hannah said. “Inside the box was a series of little presents that represented our relationship — most of them were inside jokes. The last one was the ring. It was really special because my parents and little sister were able to be there when he proposed.”The pair will be married June 5 at Randolph Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas — close to Hannah’s hometown of Houston. After a year working in Houston, they will relocate for John to attend medical school.Tags: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, engagements, marriage, Ring by Springlast_img read more

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Nature’s Fireworks: Synchronous Fireflies in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

first_imgNature’s captivating entertainers, fireflies, have always been the source of wonder from kids catching them on hot summer nights to nature photographers capturing their luminescence. Great Smoky Mountain National Park is home to at least 19 different species of firefly, but only one species-Photinus carolinus- is a synchronous firefly.The males of this particularly rare species illuminate in unison as part of a mating ritual. The fireflies exist in only a select few places in the United States, making this Blue Ridge park a must-see for a late spring and summertime showing.The fireflies travel together, light up in groups, and descend in a wave-like rhythm through the mountains. The discovery of the phenomenon is credited to Lynn Faust, a woman who had the rare privilege to grow up living in the national park. Until she shared the spectacle with those in the scientific community, researchers had no knowledge that synchronous fireflies existed in the Western Hemisphere. With this sharing of knowledge, the once hidden-away beauty now attracts thousands of people who have to reserve parking and camping spots far in advance of peak season.MAP BY STEVE STANKIEWICZLocated along the Little River and Jakes Creek Trails of Tennessee with a few sightings in North Carolina, these small magical creatures have found their way on the bucket lists of many nature lovers. Deep in the woods, you’ll find crowds of people in a peaceful hushed admiration for the spectacle that is so rare and incomparable to anything else. With record hot summers and cold winters for them to survive through, there is no telling how long the fireflies will grace the scenic lands of the national park.To get your chance to see the light show, there is a shuttle service that leaves from the Sugarlands Visitor Center just outside of Gatlinburg at 7 p.m. and returns at 11 p.m. that takes you directly to either of the two trailheads where the fireflies are seen most. Vehicle passes (up to 1,800) are distributed by lottery for the peak season of late May to early June. Late in their season, you may be able to see the fireflies even now, but it’s a great opportunity to plan for during next year’s peak season. A nearby attraction to the fireflies is the Element ghost town where tourists travel through historic cabins in an atmosphere similar to a time warp.For more information on the fireflies and some etiquette for the journey to keep in mind, check out info from the National Park Service.last_img read more

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Honduras, Colombia and Guatemala Conclude Anti-drug Military Exercise

first_img With the aim of closing the Caribbean Sea’s airspace to drug-trafficking flights, the Honduran, Colombian and Guatemalan Air Forces concluded the combined air interdiction exercise “Honcolgua I.” From December 16 to 21, combat aircraft from the three countries carried out maneuvers using the runways of Coronel Héctor Carraccioli Moncada and Coronel Enrique Soto Cano Airbases (Honduras), as well as La Aurora Airbase in Guatemala. As part of the exercise, a Colombian aircraft simulated involvement in illegal activity, crossing the border and flying through the shared space. Honcolgua I joins other military exercises that Colombia has conducted with Brazil (COLBRA), Peru (PERCOL), the Dominican Republic (CARIBE), and Honduras (HONCOL), which have strengthened airspace monitoring. These and other exercises aim to improve crew training levels and update established procedures, taking into account the fact that the enemy is constantly modifying his criminal methods. By Dialogo December 22, 2011last_img read more

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Brazilian and U.S. Air Force Academies Start Exchange Program

first_imgBy Taciana Moury/Diálogo March 22, 2017 Academy (USAFA). Beginning in July, Brazilian cadets will study at USAFA for six months, while American students attend classes at AFA in Pirassununga, in São Paulo state. According to reports from the international agreements and exchanges section of the Brazilian Aeronautics Command General Staff (EMAER, per its Portuguese acronym), this partnership aims to enhance foreign language proficiency, as well as to expand interoperability between the two air forces. During the exchange period, the cadets will take subjects for credit that are applicable to their home curricula, in addition to taking tests, completing course work, and following the schedules set by the squadrons and classes they take at USAFA and AFA respectively. They will have the same privileges and restrictions as native students, in terms of passes, weekends, and holidays. Four third-year AFA cadets were chosen to take part in the exchange with the United States. Colonel Cláudio Passos Calazza, the student exchange coordinator of the Brazilian Air Force Reserves, said that two aviation cadets, one Infantry cadet, and one Logistics cadet will be participating in the exchange. The agreement allows for a maximum of four cadets to participate in the exchange on any given semester. “The four American cadets selected are two engineering students, a political science student, and a history student,” Col. Calazza said. Cadet selection is done through academic, military, and physical rankings, as well as an eliminatory English exam. Cadet Airman Diogo Jonatan Bertolo is one of the cadets n selected for the inaugural semester under this agreement. The student stressed the importance and responsibility of taking part in this mission. “I will be representing my school and the entire Air Force. I’m going to dedicate myself to the max,” Cadet Bertolo said. The Brazilian students will take five subjects – four electives, plus English as a requirement. “I chose subjects that would complement what I have learned up to this point, such as aerospace engineering, leadership, aerodynamics, and geopolitics,” Cadet Bertolo stated. Students will also take part in extracurricular activities, such as sports, gliding, and free-fall jumping. U.S. cadet selection will be done among third- and fourth-year students who have completed at least two years of Portuguese language study, according to EMAER. The cadets will have to write a cover letter in Portuguese and pass an interview with a panel made up of instructors from the Portuguese division, including a Brazilian Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym) officer who teaches at USAFA. They must also pass minimum academic, military, and physical standards. Foreign students AFA is used to having foreigners in its student body. Since its founding — from the early days of the Aviation School at Campo dos Afonsos in Rio de Janeiro in 1941, to the present-day headquarters at Pirassununga — it has hosted 330 cadets of different nationalities, 191 of whom successfully graduated. In Brazil, the foreign cadets will take part in the same selective admissions process as Brazilian candidates. They will undergo health examinations and psychological aptitude testing, as well as take the Military Pilot Aptitude Test. According to Col. Calazza, only after passing these tests do they enroll. In addition to these evaluations, the foreign cadets take part in a six-week orientation course on Brazilian Portuguese and Brazilian culture. This year, 16 foreign students from 12 different countries will enroll in the four-year program at AFA. According to Infantry Major Renato Pereira Batista, the section chief for cadet training doctrine, students are fully immersed in the school routine. “Meal times, class times, operational exercises, military training, sports activities, and other academic experiences are identical for everyone,” he said. According to Maj. Renato, both sides want to learn more about the other country’s culture, which also helps to ease the adjustment process. That was Cadet Infantryman Yao Apollinaire Yakanou’s experience. A native of Togo, West Africa, Cadet Apollinaire is attending his second year at AFA. The interest his peers showed in him helped him adjust when he arrived in Brazil in early 2016. But it was in the sharing of knowledge that friendships began to form. “I had a lot of difficulty mastering Portuguese but I’ve always been good with numbers. So I taught math to my classmates and they, in turn, gave me lessons in Portuguese,” Cadet Apollinaire recalled. He explained how he has learned the importance of pursuing excellence at AFA. “My Brazilian instructors always say that when you think you’ve done your best, you can always push yourself further.” Military doctrine for aviation infantry is another bit of knowledge that Cadet Apollinaire will take back with him to Africa. “In Togo, only the Army is in charge of the infantry. I think it is important to introduce this concept into the Air Force as well.” Cadet Apollinaire uses his free time to get to know Brazil and the local culture. “My classmates have already shown me Rio de Janeiro, as well as Araraquara in the interior of São Paulo. I also love to listen to Brazilian music, especially sertaneja.” Flight instructor exchange The FAB maintains a flight instructor exchange with Argentina and Chile. “We have a Chilean pilot with us, an Argentine pilot will be coming to join our staff of instructors, and we are sending pilots to teach in both of those countries,” Col. Calazza explained. These service members will remain on assignment for two years. Aviator Captain Thiago Diorgilis Ribeiro Daniel is one of the exchange participants and serves as a flight instructor at the Argentine Air Force Flight School. According to him, his assignment as a foreign instructor presents certain challenges. “Immersing yourself in the local culture is a job requirement. We have to relearn all instruction in a different way that corresponds to the local culture, and in the way that operations are carried out in that country.” For the Brazilian instructor, the main advantage is learning new methods of teaching, and new technical specifications for flight training. “Doing maneuvers and using tactics that aid in student learning may be different in Argentina from how they are done in our country. This enrichment can help us a lot in continually improving our methods,” Capt. Daniel said. He will stay on as a flight instructor in Argentina until the end of 2018. AFA and USAFA have also formalized a partnership between instructors, but in terms of their academic duties, not in terms of flight training, according to the EMAER. After the agreement was signed in 2015, a Brazilian Air Force officer began taking part in the Military Personnel Exchange Program at USAFA, and in 2016, an American officer began his duties at AFA. The goal is to align strategic directives on international relations and expand the academic curriculum for future officers at participating institutions.last_img read more

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State attorneys, PDs, judges talk professionalism

first_imgAmy K. Brown Assistant Editor The Fifth Judicial Circuit courts all but shut down one day last month, as the circuit’s judges, public defenders, and state attorneys assembled in a gymnasium to attend a special seminar. The goal of the seminar, organized by the circuit’s chief judge, Victor Musleh, the state attorney, the public defender, and The Florida Bar Center for Professionalism, was to get people talking about ethics and professionalism.“It’s really the first joint attempt to become more professional in these very traumatic times,” said Public Defender Howard “Skip” Babb. “In the courts right now, the criminal courts across the state have a lot of tension. We’re trying to bridge the gap so that we can go in, make the arguments, then come out on the other side friends and professionals.”Babb and State Attorney Brad King gathered more than 100 of their assistant state attorneys and assistant public defenders, and 15 area judges to facilitate open communication about professional behavior.“It’s a siege mentality,” said Babb, “and Brad and I are sick and tired of it, so we’re taking a more positive step to get our lawyers to get with the program. And, the program is to be a professional and to do their job without animosity.”During the course of the seminar, interactive discussions were led by Blan Teagle, director of the Bar’s Center for Professionalism, Bar Ethics Counsel Elizabeth Tarbert, and Florida Supreme Court Justice Major Harding.Participants looked at several hypothetical situations, analyzed the possible ethical and professionalism issues, and offered suggestions for change. At each of more than a dozen round tables, PDs, prosecutors, and judges sat together to discuss the issues.“That’s the purpose of this, to talk about some of the issues that we see day-to-day,” King said. “You’ve got to examine yourself. What you’re going to hear will be ideas about how professionally, ethically, we should act.”State attorneys and public defenders are ideal candidates for the seminar, Teagle said, because they handle a large volume of cases with the same revolving set of opposing counsel.Additionally, state attorneys have a clear duty to act on behalf of the State of Florida, but they may have a special obligation to consider whether justice is being served in each case. Public defenders, while advocating on their clients’ behalf, are also arms of the state, which poses additional problems.One question addressed in a vignette was, “How do you balance your duty to your client with your duty to your opponent?”A PD answered, “We work with the same people over and over. We have to look at the long term.”Another added, “Although we’re adversaries in court, we have to get along outside of court.”But public defenders are often expected by their clients to “be bulldogs” to the other side, and, in some cases, clients perceive a PD’s friendliness to opposing counsel as “giving in to the other side.” To combat this perception, certain PDs fulfill the expectation of a “bulldog.”“If they expect you to be a bulldog, if they expect you to go in with both guns blazing,” a PD commented, it’s best to emphasize that you “catch more flies with honey.”Clients don’t always realize that a PD can doggedly advocate on a client’s behalf without acting like a bulldog, he said.“These people aren’t attorneys, and they don’t have the thinking process we have,” another PD added. “All they want to do is get out of jail. At some point, I hope we can stop playing these kinds of games.”The overriding theme of the seminar was open communication.“We want to get along with one another,” said Teagle. “That facilitates the administration of justice, and that’s what we’re all about. But, we don’t want that to overshadow any particular clients.”Everyone involved said the seminar was a resounding success, and several other circuits, including the Second Circuit, are looking into producing their own versions.“I think everybody got something out of it,” Babb said. “I call it a huge success.. . . It gave us something to build on. What we’re going to do next is get some specific situations that are happening in our own circuit, get the group back together, and talk about those things.”King added that he’s had a good response from the local judges, as well.“I was impressed. Our judges were impressed, and I think we had good reviews,” he said. “I think it gives everybody a better perspective of what their obligations are.”Harding concluded the seminar with a story about one of his early lessons in professionalism:When offered an appointment to the bench at 34 or 35 years old, Harding said his first thought was, “I have this opportunity, but I don’t want to go on the bench if I don’t have the respect of the bar, if they don’t think I have enough experience.”A friend and local trial lawyer told him that Harding’s experience as a lawyer was not the only requisite for being a successful judge.“A good judge will give a fair and courteous hearing, and a prompt ruling. One of the most important aspects of this is to give a prompt ruling,” Harding said his friend counseled.“Over the course of the 34 years that followed,” Harding continued, “I have begun to think that a prompt ruling is important, but giving a fair and courteous hearing is more important.. . . How we do what we do is important.”“People come away from a judicial or legal experience, if they feel they have had a fair, courteous hearing in front of an unbiased decision-maker,. . . willing to accept an adverse ruling, if they feel they have had the chance to be heard.“You, as lawyers, have a very strong part to play in letting people feel they have been heard.” May 15, 2002 Assistant Editor Regular News State attorneys, PDs, judges talk professionalismcenter_img State attorneys, PDs, judges talk professionalismlast_img read more

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Court debates Bar rules, including disbarments

first_img Court debates Bar rules, including disbarments Should ‘disciplinary resignation’ be revised to read ‘disbarment on consent’ to reduce public confusion? Jan Pudlow Senior Editor What’s the difference between “disciplinary resignation,” “disbarment on consent,” and just plain disbarment? And why is a 91-day suspension months longer than a 90-day suspension?Those distinctions sparked the most discussion during June 9 oral arguments when the Florida Supreme Court heard The Florida Bar’s Petition to Amend Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. The petition covered a handful of categories, including Bar membership classifications, inventory attorneys, rules of professional conduct, legal specialization and education, and the unlicensed practice of law.But disciplinary procedures prompted the most give-and-take between justices and Hank Coxe, incoming Bar president-elect; Gregory Parker, a member of the Board of Governors from Perry who chairs the Disciplinary Procedures Committee, and Tony Boggs, the Bar’s director of lawyer regulation.In proposed rule 3-5.1, the term “disciplinary resignation” would be revised to read “disbarment on consent” and “shall have the same effect as — and shall be governed by the same rules regarding — disbarment, and that matters involving disbarment by consent shall be processed in the same manner as conditional guilty pleas for consent judgment under rule 3-7.9.”The reason for the change in terminology was based on a policy decision by the Board of Governors to reduce confusion from a potential public perception the punishment is not tough enough or blame properly assigned when a lawyer who commits serious misconduct is allowed to “resign” and reapply in three years.Chief Justice Barbara Pariente asked: “Are you saying that The Florida Bar is making a decision that they are willing to give up disciplinary resignation — that is disbarment with getting back in three years — because you are seeing that those are the very small percentage that are the most egregious, and you would just as soon prosecute if they are not going to agree to it?”Coxe answered: “Yes, that is absolutely correct. It is anecdotal, but nevertheless in the instances in the last few years where we have had lawyers who steal $1.2 million from a client and then explain to the public that the lawyer resigned. You don’t have the opportunity to go through this lengthy explanation that it was a resignation and the Supreme Court treats it as tantamount to disbarment,” Coxe said.“Yes, let this person resign. The Bar just made a policy decision now, given the current circumstances, that we are willing to risk the resources, if it is necessary, if people don’t accept disbarment upon consent, and do what we have to do with those lawyers whose misconduct is as egregious as it is.”As Parker pointed out: “The rules, which refer to disciplinary resignation all make comment, as well as the court’s rulings, in cases where there is an acceptance of a disciplinary resignation, always quote and point out that it is the functional equivalent of a disbarment or tantamount to disbarment.”Justice Charles Wells said: “We’ve been doing that for the last couple of years, I understand, but we’ve never crossed this bridge as to whether in every instance of a disciplinary resignation we are going to not allow the person to reapply for five years. But is it the Bar’s understanding that this could cross that bridge?”Parker: “That’s correct.”Justice Peggy Quince followed up on that proposed change that would amend the period to reapply for admission from the previous three years to five years.“I always assumed that it had the three-year provision because it might facilitate people actually agreeing to the disciplinary resignation, as opposed to the Bar having to go through the whole procedure of a disbarment,” Quince said. “So was that considered when you decided to change the rule to disbarment on consent and make it a five-year period?”Boggs responded: “We did, in fact, discuss that, and we directly considered it. . . . We were making it the same as disbarment, but allowing it to be by consent, so it would relate to someone who wanted to be able to say, ‘I quit of my own volition.’”Justice Fred Lewis asked whether there was room for negotiation for less than five years in the appropriate case.“Disbarment would not be able to be for less than five years, because the rule says it is for a minimum of five years,” Boggs responded.Justice Harry Lee Anstead offered: “There is still nothing to prevent the lawyer and the Bar from stipulating before a referee to a three-year suspension as the primary discipline imposed. Is that correct?”“That is correct,” Boggs answered. “I would say to you, though, your honor, that in the cases where disbarment was appropriate, we would more than likely not be willing to do that. But we would be able to negotiate the three-year suspension in appropriate cases, yes, sir.”Presenting a perspective from the other side was attorney John Weiss, who represents attorneys going through the grievance process.“I think that if the public and press are confused by disciplinary resignation, they are going to be confused by disbarment on consent. And it is pretty much that simple,” Weiss said.“You have said that there is a stigma, that your client might agree to a disciplinary resignation, not the disbarment on consent. So obviously, in their mind, it is saying something more than a disciplinary resignation?” Pariente asked.“Absolutely,” Weiss answered. “.. . I would be less than candid with this court if I said this is an issue that’s in front of me all the time. We’re looking at one every other year or so. This is a policy decision on whether we eliminate the three-year option. Before, the lawyers have the option for a disciplinary resignation for three years. The disbarment for consent will up that to five years. That’s a policy decision. There is no argument on my part there.”Weiss said he “understands completely that disciplinary proceedings are to some extent for public trust in the system.” But he asked: “Why even bother to have disbarment on consent. . . . Just make it disbarment.”Justice Raoul Cantero added: “It remains to be seen whether it will even be used if there is no gain to the respondent from going to an evidentiary hearing and putting the Bar to its proof.”“Absolutely,” agreed Weiss, who said he negotiates settlements in about three-quarters of his cases.“A while ago I was being asked, can you still negotiate it to a three-year suspension versus disbarment. The distinction there is not a line in the sand. I mean, it is a moat,” Weiss continued. “The compromise between a one year or even a 91-day suspension and three years is a lot easier to reach than that compromise between three years and disbarment. The disciplinary resignation is a way for a lawyer to get out, and, frankly, save face in some instances. It is that simple.”As Pariente pointed out, 91 days never means a 91 days suspension.“I tell clients if you are suspended for 90 days, you are back in business on the 91st day,” Weiss said. “If you are suspended for 91 days, it is a minimum of nine months, possibly as long as a year.. . . I think the fastest reinstatement I have ever had in 30 years on either side of the fence was five months.”That’s because lawyers suspended for 91 days must wait for the time (91 days) to run; petition the court for reinstatement, which includes a notice in the Bar News seeking comments on a lawyer’s fitness to return to practicing law; participate in discovery; prove rehabilitation in a trial before a trial judge appointed as the referee; and obtain an order of the court granting reinstatement. Court debates Bar rules, including disbarments July 15, 2005 Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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North Bellport Home Invasion Victim Shot; 1 Arrested

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A North Bellport home invasion ended with a 42-year-old man shot wound wounded, one suspect arrested and Suffolk County police searching for two suspects that got away early Wednesday morning, authorities said.The victim briefly spoke with people he noticed in a vehicle parked in front of his home Sundial Lane, when two people got out of the car and at least one of them pointed a gun at the victim’s head and forced him into the house at 3 a.m., police said.Once inside, a struggle ensued between at least one of the suspects, the victim and his 21-year-old son, police said. The 42-year-old man was shot once in the stomach, police said.The victim was taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center in East Patchogue, where he was listed in serious but stable condition.The suspects fled the scene, but officers apprehended one of them—Tory Fenner, of West Babylon—shortly later in Shirley, police said. The other two suspects fled the scene.Fenner was charged with burglary and criminal possession of a weapon. He will be arraigned Thursday at First District Court in Central Islip.Fifth Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on this incident to call them at 631-854-8552 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

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Hector Bellerin reveals his injury against Chelsea made Arsenal team-mate Rob Holding cry

first_imgBellerin missed the second half of Arsenal’s season with the injury (Picture: Getty)The sight of Bellerin’s injury proved too much for Arsenal defender Holding who understood the pain his team-mate was going through after rupturing the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee just a month earlier. AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘It wasn’t him that told me this, but someone came up to me after that Chelsea game and said, “Oh just so you know, when Rob saw you get injured he started crying”. And I thought it was crazy,’ Bellerin told Arsenal’s official website.‘At the time I’d got injured, I knew that I’d hurt myself and I’m not someone who dwells on things too much. Half an hour afterwards, everyone was feeling sorry for me but I didn’t need to hear it because I knew I wasn’t OK. ‘I was past it, I was moving on and focusing on being in the right frame of mind for the next nine months. ‘But then obviously I hadn’t gone through the surgery or the first few days of rehab, so I think Rob felt how hard it was going to be for me because he’d already gone through those stages.’ Rob Holding and Hector Bellerin made their comebacks in Arsenal’s win over Nottingham Forest (Picture: Getty)Hector Bellerin has revealed that Rob Holding broke down in tears at the sight of him suffering a serious knee injury in Arsenal’s Premier League win over Chelsea last season.First-half goals from Alexandre Lacazette and Laurent Koscielny sealed a comfortable 2-0 victory at the Emirates just over a year ago, but Bellerin’s devastating ACL injury put a dampener on Arsenal’s London derby celebrations.It meant Bellerin was sidelined for the remainder of the campaign and the Spain right-back only began playing regular first-team football again towards the end of October. Metro Sport ReporterThursday 19 Mar 2020 1:11 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link5.5kShares Hector Bellerin reveals his injury against Chelsea made Arsenal team-mate Rob Holding cry Commentcenter_img Advertisement Holding suffered the same injury against Manchester United (Picture: Getty)Bellerin added: ‘His emotion at the time just shows how much of a family we are in here and how just seeing your team-mate going through something like that can hit you,’ Bellerin continued.‘Rob is a great guy and isn’t afraid to show his emotions and that’s something which also made me realise how much we each appreciate each other. ‘It’s great that I can share a dressing room with someone I have that sort of relationship and respect for – and the fact that we were able to make our comebacks together made it even more special.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalBellerin and Holding formed a close bond during their rehabilitation together and would go on to make their comebacks in the same game as Arsenal put five goals past Nottingham Forest to reach the Carabao Cup fourth round.Holding’s towering header in the 71st minute doubled Arsenal’s lead and Bellerin assisted the hosts’ third with a superb pass for Joe Willock in front of a rapturous Emirates crowd.Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Former Arsenal player tells Mikel Arteta how to get the best out of Nicolas PepeMORE: Willian sends message to Chelsea manager Frank Lampard amid Arsenal and Tottenham transfer links Advertisementlast_img read more

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