University supports research initiatives

first_imgThe University recently announced the administration will continue to push its goal of becoming one of the best research institutions in the world and announced an additional $40 million of internal funding to support nine projects.“Doing research is fundamental to the University,” Executive Vice President John Affleck-Graves said. “The goal of the University is fairly simple — to be a source for good throughout the world. We do that through three ways: our undergraduate program, our research and our Catholic tradition.”The funding is part of the second phase of the University’s Strategic Research Initiative (SRI), which began last year and now stands as an $80 million investment. Projects funded examine nanotechnology, sustainable energy, climate change and the interaction of Roman Catholicism and Islam, among other subjects.“We are studying some very important questions and some very important problems, and the impact of the things that we find is going to influence many important things around the world,” Vice President for Research Robert Bernhard said. “We felt, as a panel, that we have a chance to make great breakthroughs in those areas.”Bernhard said research is different for each field, and the University’s goal encompasses “research, scholarship and creative endeavor.”“Many people in the humanities do research, but they often refer to it as scholarship,” he said. “For the scientist, research is the discovery of knowledge — learning something that no one has ever learned before. For the social scientist, it’s looking at improving human conditions. For the engineer, it’s solving problems. For the artist and people in architecture, it’s the creative experience of being able to do something that’s admired. The shorthand version is, it’s all research.”Bernhard said pushing Notre Dame to become one of the premier research institutions would help the University attract an elite faculty.“Faculty from the very best universities are all involved in some type of scholarship or research and want the opportunity to continue that work because it helps them have an impact on the world and stay current in their subject,” he said. “Research is important for people and for impact.”According to Bernhard, students also stand to benefit from the funding because it will provide them with not only the best teachers, but also the opportunity to get involved.“I think students benefit significantly both from the type of faculty that we will be able to recruit as part of these things and secondly from the opportunity for them to get involved,” he said. “More and more of our undergraduate students are doing research, and I think that the trend is going to continue.”Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Jessica Hellmann agreed, adding that expanding research will allow the best students to work with the best faculty.“Of course, research plays a critical role in enhancing undergraduate and graduate student instruction; the best students want to work with the best faculty on the most pressing problems of the day,” she said. “By having a great research infrastructure, Notre Dame can offer courses and experiences to students that are taught by leaders in the field.”Hellmann, whose project is titled “Notre Dame Collaboratory for the Study of Adaptation to Climate Change,” said her research will allow her to have a real impact on the world beyond campus.“Research provides the University the opportunity to engage and affect the world around us,” she said. “Climate change adaptation will involve difficult decisions that are legal, moral, scientific and political, and Notre Dame is uniquely poised for this kind of interdisciplinary and complex thinking.”Engineering Professor Tracy Kijewski-Correa, whose project is titled “CYBER-EYE: A Cyber-Collaboratory for National Risk Modeling and Assessment to Mitigate the Impacts of Hurricanes in a Changing Climate,” said it is important for Notre Dame to fund research initiatives because it is one of the areas where the University lags behind its peer institutions.“As a university with a strong undergraduate educational tradition, we lag behind many of our peers who have been doing research from ‘day one,’” she said. “One part of their competitive advantage, aside from their long standing traditions in research, is the fact that they have endowments to seed research ideas.”Kijewski-Correa said her project will help contribute to Notre Dame’s mission by finding a way to save the lives that are often lost in disastrous hurricanes.“Notre Dame has had a long tradition of responding with great compassion and generosity to help the afflicted in the wake of these disasters,” she said. “This project would deepen that mission commitment by helping us to lead the way on developing hazard-resilient communities using cutting edge research to prevent these losses altogether.”The panel that evaluated the merits of the research proposals, which included both Affleck-Graves and Bernhard, originally received 45 three-page proposals. Bernhard said the proposals were evaluated based on a set of criteria, which included mission fit, contribution to the research prominence of the University, educational benefits for students and whether the project was sustainable in the future.“The University is trying to jump start areas of research that they believe will be important in the future and where Notre Dame can play a role,” said Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Paul Huber, who is leading an initiative called “Assessment of the Impact of Nanoparticles on Human Health and the Environment.”Of the original 45, 10 were invited to write full proposals, which the panel then sent to be evaluated by the top experts in each of the respective fields.“My proposal was selected based upon the uniqueness of the research approach, the importance of the research to Notre Dame’s mission and the possibility that the research could provide a significant return on investment in terms of research dollars resulting from the proof-of-concept research proposed,” said Professor of Biological Sciences Malcolm Fraser, who is spearheading the initiative entitled “Developing Group I Intron Antiviral Strategies for Treating HIV and HCV Infections.”Fraser, whose project will attempt to develop cures for HIV and HCV, said his project will help raise the University’s visibility in the research field while also possibly curing one of mankind’s greatest plagues.“The unique approach we are establishing immediately provides high value and high visibility research for the University,” he said. “If successful, we will have made a unique and significant contribution to the development of cures for these two extremely important diseases.”Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Gregory Hartland, whose project is called “A Focused Interdisciplinary Research Group in Nanostructured Solar Cells,” said his project will help boost Notre Dame’s reputation as a leader in the nanotechnology field while also attempting to find a cheap, sustainable source of energy.“We think we will be able to get some very high profile papers out of our efforts, which will show (along with the work being done in the NDNano center) that Notre Dame is a serious player in nanoscience at an international level,” he said. “Hopefully, this will also lead to new funding (from agencies such as the NSF and DOE), and establish Notre Dame as a leader in nanomaterials for solar energy applications.”But while Hartland examines the applications of nanotechnology, Huber will be looking at its possible perils, particularly whether or not nanoparticles are toxic to humans.“A lot of different materials are being developed and released into the environment because they’re not regulated,” Huber said. “If the University is going to be involved in research activities, then the burden is on them to make sure everything is safe.”The other four projects chosen were the “Sustainable Energy Initiative” from Professor of Chemical and Bimolecular Engineering Joan Brennecke; the “N.D. Environmental Change Initiative” from Professor of Biological Sciences David Lodge; “Contending with Modernity: Islam and Roman Catholicism in a Secular Age” from Professor of History R. Scott Appleby; and “Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design — eWind” from Engineering Professor Thomas Corke.Affleck-Graves said the projects have the potential to help shape the world.“It’s through their research that the faculty can change the world,” he said. “Curing a neglected disease, tackling the problem of religious fundamental violence, energy and the environment — these are all ways that Notre Dame can help change the world.”In the future, Bernhard said he is undecided about whether another round of funding will take place, but he stressed that the SRI was just the beginning.“These two rounds of investment are part of our process but they’re not all of it,” he said. “We’re thinking about whether a third round makes sense and whether we would want to do a third round. We’re not decided on that yet.”last_img read more

Continue Reading

Saint Mary’s campaign raises $25 million over goal

first_imgSaint Mary’s concluded its comprehensive fundraising campaign, “Faith Always, Action Now,” after surpassing the initial goal and raising $105 million, making it the most successful fundraising campaign in the College’s 171-year history.Vice president for College Relations Shari Rodriguez said the campaign idea originated from the plan College President Carol Ann Mooney’s devised in 2008, which outlined the goals of the College for the next five years.President Mooney’s strategic plan prioritized renovations in the College’s Science Hall and Angela Athletic Facility as well as student scholarships, Rodriguez said. The Board of Trustees deliberated and determined in order to implement the plan, the College needed to secure funding through a fundraiser, Rodriguez said.Before the campaign’s launch, the Board of Trustees determined how feasible the fundraiser would be by gauging the interest of alumnae and friends of the College.“The feasibility report really showed the passion that donors had for the College,” Rodriguez said. “Little did we know, how difficult things were going to be financially at the time. [In 2008] when the campaign began, the recession wasn’t fully realized yet.”Despite the difficult launch of the campaign, “Faith Always, Action Now” raised a record amount of money is the College’s history. Rodriguez said the campaign was a success because the donors recognized their contributions help further the education of current and future Saint Mary’s women.“Our goal was to create opportunities for students through scholarships and to support the educational environment and faculty,” Rodriguez said. “That was our driving motivation and we persevered. We continued to talk about the amazing education that young women get here and the need to make certain that it’s accessible financially.”Rodriguez said the College’s mission remained on the forefront of the campaign while the heritage of the Sisters of the Holy Cross guided it through the entire process.“Saint Mary’s continues to answer the need of society, which hearkens back to the Holy Cross Sisters,” she said. “They assessed the need and answered the call to lead women’s education, which is exactly what our graduate programs are doing today.”The campaign also facilitated the addition of three new graduate programs to Saint Mary’s curriculum beginning in fall of 2015. The programs are a Doctorate of Nursing Practice, a Master of Science in Data Science and a Master of Science in Speech Pathology.To continue to educate women, no matter their financial status, “Faith Always, Action Now” set of a goal of $20 million for student scholarships, Rodriguez said. The college surpassed that goal by $15 million, raising a total of $35 million for future students.“One thing that has been made clear through the great recession is that we are called to make certain that young women can be educated in a Catholic liberal arts tradition,” Rodriguez said. “I don’t think there’s any better place than at Saint Mary’s to get that education. So we really want to create that access for the future.”Rodriguez said “Faith Always, Action Now” can be attributed to the hard work of the College’s president as well as the great education already offered at Saint Mary’s.“The success of the campaign is in part because of the great leadership of President Mooney and a solid strategic plan,” she said. “But the [campaign’s success] also highlights the education that is offered here. Donors believe the strength of the educational experience here is worthy of the investments they have made.”The campaign celebration is scheduled for April 17. All the donors who have given to Saint Mary’s will be invited to campus to celebrate and watch the groundbreaking of the new soccer, softball and lacrosse fields.Rodriguez said the College appreciates the donors who have helped to make this the most successful campaign in Saint Mary’s history and who continue to build the College’s legacy through new programs and facilities.“We are so grateful to the donors who believe in the mission here and have supported the College to continuously educate women,” Rodriguez said.Tags: Action Now”, donors, educational environment, Faith Always, Fundraising Campaign, Sisters of the Holy Cross, student scholarshipslast_img read more

Continue Reading

Jennifer Hudson IS Coming to B’way in The Color Purple, But Not as Celie

first_img Related Shows Jennifer Hudson View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 8, 2017 The Color Purple Jennifer Hudson is indeed coming to Broadway this year!  As previously speculated, the Oscar and Grammy winner will make her Great White Way debut in the John Doyle-helmed revival of The Color Purple; however, instead of playing Celie, as The New York Post mistakenly reported, Hudson will take on the role of Shug Avery.Although further casting has yet to be announced, Broadway.com has learned that the show’s producers, including Oprah Winfrey and Scott Sanders, are in talks with Cynthia Erivo, who played the role of Celie in the 2013 staging at London’s Menier Chocolate Factory, to reprise her performance across the pond.Hudson won an Oscar for Dreamgirls. Her additional film and TV credits include American Idol, Sex and the City, The Secret Life of Bees, Winnie Mandela, The Three Stooges, Smash and Black Nativity. She won the Grammy Award for Best R&B Album for 2008’s Jennifer Hudson.The Color Purple features a book by Marsha Norman, lyrics by Brenda Russell, Allee Willis and Stephen Bray and music by Russell and Willis. Based on the novel by Alice Walker, the musical tells the story of Celie, a woman who, through love, finds the strength to triumph over adversity and discovers her voice in the world. Doyle’s stripped-down production opened in London on July 15, 2013. The new staging cuts approximately 30 minutes of material from the original incarnation. Star Fileslast_img read more

Continue Reading

Paul Ettore Tabone & More Join West End’s Phantom

first_imgBen Forster in ‘The Phantom of the Opera'(Photo: Matt Crockett) View Comments The West End’s The Phantom of the Opera is about to welcome some new faces. Beginning September 5, Paul Ettore Tabone, Siôn Lloyd and Mark Oxtoby will join the cast as Piangi and Monsieurs Firmin and Andre, respectively. On that same day, current ensemble member Daisy Hurlbert will assume the role of Meg Giry.The production is currently headlined by Superstar winner Ben Forster. The four new performers will take over for Michael Matus, Christopher Dickins, John Ellis and Alicia Beck.Tabone previously appeared as Squelch in Love Never Dies in the West End and in Hamburg. A “Young Artist” for the Luciano Pavarotti Foundation, his opera credits include Rigoletto, Turandot and Madama Butterfly. Lloyd can currently be seen in Titanic at the Charing Cross Theatre; he originated the role of Brian in the West End production of Avenue Q. Oxtoby’s previous credits include Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat in the West End. Prior to The Phantom of the Opera, Hurlbert served as a company member of the National Moravan-Silesian Ballet in the Czech Republic.The current London cast of The Phantom of the Opera also includes Celinde Schoenmaker as Christine Daae, Nadim Naaman as Raoul, Megan Llewellyn as Carlotta and Jacinta Mulcahy as Madame Giry. Harriet Jones plays Christine at select performances. The long-running musical celebrates its 30th anniversary at Her Majesty’s Theatre in October.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Why Ragtime’s Story of Anguish & Hope Deserves to Be Told in 2016

first_img View Comments Jennifer Saayeng & Ako Mitchell in ‘Ragtime'(Photo: Annabel Vere) The first act of Lynn Ahrens, Stephen Flaherty and Terrence McNally’s Ragtime ends with Sarah, a young black woman, murdered by police as she’s mistakenly identified as a potential assassin at a political rally. With little time for the audience to process her death, the company launches into the passionate dirge “Till We Reach That Day,” longing for the denied day of justice and peace.In Charing Cross Theatre’s new production, which runs through December 10 in London, there is no escaping the immediacy of the mourners’ demands. As the cast cries out the final refrain (fiercely led by soloist Seyi Omooba), the house lights come up, and the performers, playing white upper class New Yorkers, grieving African Americans and struggling immigrants, step off the stage and into the aisles. Their anguish is in the illuminated audience’s faces.In that moment, there is no divide between then and now. “Till We Reach That Day” is a song written in the ‘90s, based on a book from the ‘70s and set in the early 1900s, and yet it could have been composed days ago in the wake of the deaths of unarmed black men, women and children at the hands of police. Its melody pervades Sarah’s funeral, but its message was cried out for Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice and more by the Black Lives Matter movement.“So many of the themes in the show are recurring and still happening,” Jennifer Saayeng, who plays Sarah, told Broadway.com following a recent performance. “The lyric, ‘It’ll happen again and again.’ It’s still happening again and again. This story of hope—if it’s told in 100 years, there will still be reasons to tell it.”The fringe staging began performances on October 8—exactly one month prior to the U.S. presidential election. On November 9, the outcome added a layer of urgency and catharsis for the performers. “It was like the dream of America had just gone away overnight,” said Ako Mitchell, the American actor who plays the black musician turned radical activist Coalhouse Walker Jr. “We’re doing this optimistic piece, and it took on a poignancy it didn’t have the day before.”Ragtime resonates with U.K. audiences in a time of political uncertainty as well. “This idea of race and immigrants is massive here,” explained Saayeng. “With Brexit, these are people who are warped by some sort of view of immigration. It’s American on the stage, but it relates to so many things British here. We still identify with it.”Though the events depicted on stage in Ragtime are tragically timely, Mitchell urges audiences to leave with a sense of hope—hope that we’re closer to reaching that day described in the Act I finale. “We know that hope triumphs in the end,” he says. “The people in 1904? They did not know. And all they had was hope. There is always hope, and I know it will happen again.”Ragtime concludes its run at London’s Charing Cross Theatre on December 10.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Major pumped hydro storage project moves forward in Montana

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Associated Press:Construction on a $1 billion energy storage system in central Montana could start as soon as next year after its sponsors said Friday they reached a financing agreement with a Danish firm that invests in renewable energy.Carl Borgquist, president of Bozeman-based Absaroka Energy, said the involvement of Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners of Denmark marks a significant step forward for the 400-megawatt project near Martinsdale. Next up, he said, is to make arrangements with utilities or others interested in using the Montana facility to complement their own electricity generation.“That’s our last step before we’re able to go under construction and start putting concrete and steel in the ground,” Borgquist said.The Gordon Butte Pumped Storage Hydro Project was first proposed in 2010 and is intended to make wind turbines and other renewable energy sources more reliable, by storing the electricity they produce until it’s needed. Described as a “hydro battery,” it would use excess power produced by wind farms or other sources to pump water from a reservoir uphill to a second reservoir. The water would be released during periods of high electricity demand, turning hydropower turbines to generate power.A spokeswoman for Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners confirmed the firm’s involvement in the project. Senior Partner Christian Skakkebaek said in a statement that pumped storage hydro “will be a key resource as the global transition to renewable energy continues to accelerate in states such as Montana.”More: Montana energy storage project lines up financial partner Major pumped hydro storage project moves forward in Montanalast_img read more

Continue Reading

MBL changes would provide $5B for businesses, create 50K jobs

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Credit unions can bring billions of dollars into the economy with no cost to the government, CUNA Chief Advocacy Officer Ryan Donovan wrote to all 535 Congressional offices Monday. Donovan highlighted how Congressional changes to the credit union member business lending cap of 12.25% of assets can help America’s communities as they recover from the pandemic.“You can have a direct impact on rebuilding America’s communities by temporarily removing the statutory business lending cap on credit unions,” Donovan wrote. “Taking action now will free up $5 billion to lend to small businesses [and] create 50,000 jobs to support local employers.”Donovan linked to a CUNA advocacy document outlining how credit unions are positioned to deploy capital to small businesses and entrepreneurs around the country.last_img read more

Continue Reading

CDC puts flu vaccine supply at 115 million doses

first_imgOct 18, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today increased its estimate of the flu vaccine supply for this season but said many healthcare providers don’t have their full supply yet because of distribution issues.At a press conference today, Jeanne Santoli, MD, MPH, deputy director of the CDC’s immunization services division, said about 115 million doses of flu vaccine will be available this season, which is 15 million more than the agency’s September projection. She said 40 million doses were distributed by the end of the second week of October, and that 75 million doses would be distributed by the end of the month.”That’s 15 million more than last October,” Santoli said.The CDC’s revised estimate follows the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Oct 5 approval of another flu vaccine, ID Biomedical’s FluLaval. The CDC had said in September that licensing of FluLaval could boost the US supply for this year to 115 million doses.The CDC has received some complaints from heathcare providers who have received only partial shipments of the vaccine they ordered, Santoli said. Also, the American Academy of Pediatrics said this week that most doses of the only flu vaccine approved for use in children aged 6 months to 3 years, Sanofi’s Pasteur’s Fluzone, won’t be available until at least November. Sanofi announced last week that delivery of the vaccine would be about 3 weeks later than last year.Though some vaccine manufacturers said earlier this year that they had trouble with a slow-growing strain of one of the viruses used in this season’s vaccine, Santoli said the companies have told the CDC that they’ve since overcome those problems.”The most important thing is how many doses, and 75 million in October is a lot of vaccine,” she said. “To us, it feels like the vaccine will get out there when it’s needed.”Because flu vaccine sales and distribution are handled by private companies, the CDC can’t control the flow of the product to customers. Many vaccine distributors voluntarily submit product tracking information to the CDC, but the distribution status is often unclear. “It’s hard to predict when orders will be delivered, and this uncertainty presents providers a challenge in planning vaccine activity,” Santoli said.”There’s no mechanism to know how many doses providers have received,” she said.Vaccine distributors take a phased approach to product delivery, so that all customers receive some of their doses early in the season and can begin immunizing high-risk patients and their household contacts, Santoli said.The CDC is making a point of not calling distribution issues a delay, she said. When that language was used last year, it “caused people to step aside and not get the vaccine,” she said, adding that the CDC wants to give providers as much information about distribution as possible so they can plan their immunization activities accordingly.Also, the CDC is not recommending that high-risk people be immunized first this year. “With the large amount available, we want as many people as possible to be immunized,” she said.Administering the flu vaccine in November, December, January and beyond is consistent with federal Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations, Santoli said, noting that flu cases often peak in February or later.Santoli said the 3-week delay of Fluzone should not impair the benefits of vaccination for young children, and she advised parents to continue seeking the vaccine from their children’s’ healthcare providers.In June, federal health officials recommended that toddlers aged 2 through 4 years be immunized against influenza each year, adding millions of people to the groups included in flu vaccination recommendations.See also:Oct 17 CIDRAP News story “Flu vaccine delay affects toddlers”Oct 5 CIDRAP News story “FDA approves 5th flu vaccine”last_img read more

Continue Reading

290 million students out of school as global virus battle intensifies

first_imgAlmost 300 million students worldwide faced weeks at home with Italy and India the latest to shut schools over the deadly new coronavirus, as the IMF urged an all-out global offensive against the epidemic.More than 95,000 people have been infected and over 3,200 have died worldwide from the virus, which by Thursday had reached more than 80 countries and territories.The US state of California declared an emergency following its first coronavirus fatality — raising the US death toll to 11 — and a cruise ship was kept offshore after passengers and crew members developed symptoms. Topics : Economic threat Infections are now rising faster abroad than they are in China, where 31 more deaths and 139 new cases were reported Thursday. China’s toll now stands at 3,012, with over 80,000 infections.AFP reporters saw a handful of people trickling back into Wuhan, the quarantined city at the center of the epidemic, at the train station this week.Beijing is now concerned about importing cases, with 20 infections brought from abroad so far — prompting several cities to require people arriving from hard-hit countries to self-quarantine.Japan announced on Thursday that a state visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping this spring had been postponed because containing the epidemic was “the biggest challenge” for the two countries.China, the world’s second largest economy, has been badly hit by the outbreak, which has also rumbled global stock markets, with Europe’s major exchanges sinking again Thursday. The IMF said it was making $50 billion in aid available for low-income and emerging-market countries to fight the epidemic, which it sees as a “serious threat” that would slow global growth to below last year’s 2.9 percent.”At a time of uncertainty… it is better to do more than to do not enough,” IMF chief Kristalina Georgieva said.In the United States, lawmakers reached a deal to provide more than $8 billion to fight the outbreak. No kissing Thousands of people were stranded on the Grand Princess off the California coast Wednesday as officials delayed its return to carry out tests on people on board.A 71-year-old man who had been aboard the same ship during its previous voyage to Mexico died after contracting COVID-19.The vessel belongs to Princess Cruises, the same company which operated a coronavirus-stricken ship held off Japan last month on which more than 700 people on board tested positive, with six dying from the disease.The US and other governments have taken extraordinary measures to contain the outbreak. Japan will quarantine all arrivals from China and South Korea for two weeks, while the United Arab Emirates warned its citizens to “avoid travelling”. Saudi Arabia has suspended the year-round Islamic “umrah” pilgrimage, an unprecedented move that raises fresh uncertainty over the annual hajj.New measures in Italy — where 11 towns with 50,000 have been under quarantine — include a month-long nationwide ban on fan attendance at sports events, and advising people to avoid greetings like kissing on the cheek or shaking hands.center_img Switzerland reported its first death from the outbreak on Thursday, while Bosnia and South Africa confirmed their first cases and Greece’s cases surged after 21 travellers recently returned from a bus trip to Israel and Egypt tested positive for the virus.  Most deaths and infections are in China, where the virus first emerged late last year, prompting the country to quarantine entire cities, temporarily shut factories and close schools indefinitely.But it has quickly spread beyond China’s borders.  Several countries have implemented extraordinary measures, with UNESCO saying on Wednesday that school closures in more than a dozen countries have affected 290.5 million children.  India, the world’s second most populous country, later announced it was closing all primary schools in the capital New Delhi until the end of March to prevent the virus from spreading.  The orders came as an India-EU summit scheduled for March 13 was also postponed.  While temporary school closures during crises are not new, UNESCO chief Audrey Azoulay said “the global scale and speed of the current educational disruption is unparalleled and, if prolonged, could threaten the right to education”.Italy on Wednesday ordered schools and universities shut until March 15, ramping up its response as national fatalities rose to 107.South Korea — second to China in terms of infections with cases jumping past 6,000 on Thursday — has postponed the start of the next term until March 23.In Japan, nearly all schools are closed after Prime Minister Shinzo Abe called for classes to be cancelled until early April.Schools have also shut in Iran, where 107 people have died from the disease — alongside Italy, the deadliest outbreak outside China.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Weekly Update: Supporting Job Creation and the Middle Class, Continuing Fight for a Severance Tax, Backing Bill to Combat the Opioid Epidemic

first_imgLike Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Weekly Update: Supporting Job Creation and the Middle Class, Continuing Fight for a Severance Tax, Backing Bill to Combat the Opioid Epidemic November 03, 2017 By: The Office of Governor Tom Wolf 80% of the $ raised by a reasonable #ShaleTax would be paid by non-PA customers. It shouldn’t be an R or D issue – it just makes sense. https://t.co/xjiVfPFPMU— Governor Tom Wolf (@GovernorTomWolf) November 1, 2017 The Blog,  Weekly Update On Tuesday, Governor Wolf visited Webjunto in Philadelphia to meet with employees and highlight the importance of workforce training and job creation. The governor continued to promote job creation in PA with the announcement of the creation of 285 jobs in Wilkes-Barre and the approvals of small business projects that will create nearly 400 jobs over the next three years.As part of his commitment to creating jobs that pay and supporting the middle class, Governor Wolf created a Middle Class Task Force to host meetings across the commonwealth and hear Pennsylvanians’ concerns and ideas to improve the lives of the middle class. This week the task force hosted meetings in Pittstown, Luzerne County and at Edinboro University in Erie County.On Monday, Governor Wolf addressed the Pennsylvania Press Club and discussed the need for a severance tax.“There is no greater example of Harrisburg dysfunction than the House Republicans’ refusal to vote on a severance tax.” Governor Wolf said. “Last week, the House Republican leadership could have called up a vote on this tax on big oil and gas companies, but neglected to do so. It’s well past time to pass a tax on shale. And we saw just that in the past few months after the repeated failure of the Republican House to finalize a budget deal and their refusal to pass a severance tax.”Combating the heroin and opioid epidemic is a top priority for Governor Wolf and, on Wednesday, he urged Congress to pass the “Combating the Opioid Epidemic Act.” The bill was introduced by U.S. Senators Bob Casey and Ed Markey.“In Pennsylvania, our efforts to save lives and get people into treatment are making a difference but there is still more work do to and the federal government must be a bigger partner,” Governor Wolf said. “Washington must do more to give states resources and tools to get people help.”Also on Wednesday, the governor was joined by Philadelphia city officials and state legislators to sign a bill that would crack down on nuisance bars, also known as ‘stop-and-go’ stores. The legislation was included in the Fiscal Code and gives the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board the authority to conduct more inspections and immediately suspend the liquor license of establishments that are harmful to communities.Governor Wolf’s Week, October 29 – November 4, 2017Monday, 10/30/17Governor Wolf’s Middle Class Task Force Stops in Northeastern PennsylvaniaAt Press Club, Governor Wolf Vows to Continue Fight for Severance TaxTuesday, 10/31/17Wolf Administration Approves Luzerne County Facility to Begin Medical Marijuana ProductionGovernor Wolf Visits Webjunto, Highlighting the Importance of ApprenticeshipWednesday, 11/1/17GO-TIME: General Services Procurement Savings Top $143 Million and GrowingGovernor Wolf Announces Creation of 285 New Jobs Through Expansion of Berkshire Hathaway GUARD Headquarters in Wilkes-BarreGovernor Wolf Announces New Approvals for Low-Interest Loans to Support 23 Small Business Projects and Nearly 400 New JobsGovernor Wolf Signs Bill to Crack Down on Nuisance BarsThursday, 11/2/17Governor Wolf Backs Casey Bill to Combat Opioid Epidemic, Bolster TreatmentGovernor Wolf Announces Pennsylvania Joining National Emergency Broadband Network FirstNetFriday, 11/3/17Governor Wolf’s Middle Class Task Force Holds Roundtable Discussion in Northwestern PennsylvaniaGO-TIME: Department of Corrections Unveils First-of-Its-Kind Management SystemWolf Administration Approves Clinton County Facility to Begin Medical Marijuana ProductionHighlights from The BlogPA.gov That Works: More Pilot Updates and Our New LookHighlights from TwitterWith 13 overdose deaths in PA each day, a sense of urgency is vital. TY @SenBobCasey for advocating for PA families fighting this crisis. https://t.co/SY9idsBNh8— Governor Tom Wolf (@GovernorTomWolf) November 2, 2017 SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Continue Reading