UWI eye top-four spot

first_imgRed Stripe Premier League new boys the University of the West Indies (UWI) FC are having a wonderful first season and have a top-four spot in sight. UWI won the Kingston and St Andrew Football Association (KSAFA) Super League last season before gaining a spot to the nation’s top league by advancing from the Jamaica Football Federation’s play-offs. After 25 games, UWI have surprised many by moving away from the relegation zone and are currently in fifth position in the 12-team league with 34 points, behind Montego Bay United (51), Arnett Gardens (49), Portmore United (46), and Humble Lion (36). At the completion of the preliminary stage, the top four will battle for the title. “We are still mathematically just a point from safety, we will take it from there and continue to accumulate points and see where it takes us,” Marcel Gayle, coach of UWI told The Gleaner. “We have conceded 34 goals, but the team has been scoring goals,” Gayle pointed out. “We are going to pursue a spot in the semi-final,” he said. Looking ahead to the next fixture against Boys’ Town at UWI Bowl next Sunday, Gayle said honours were even in the first two games. “Well, the teams have shared a win apiece, so it will be crucial to come away with maximum points against Boys’ Town,” he shared. “These guys are putting in the hard work and playing for each other, and that is key,” Gayle reasoned. “We are not totally satisfied but grateful for what has happened,” he said.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Vishal can provide stability, says Browne

first_imgST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC): Chief selector Courtney Browne believes Vishal Singh can provide added stability in the West Indies middle order during the upcoming Test series against Pakistan. The 28-year-old left-hander was one of two uncapped players named in the 13-man squad to face Pakistan in the opening Test bowling off at Sabina Park in Jamaica on Friday. Vishal endured an underwhelming first-class season, but carved out an unbeaten 135 in the three-day tour match against the Pakistanis at the Trelawny Multi-Purpose Stadium last weekend to force his way into contention. “Vishal has been one of the more consistent batsmen in the regional four-day tournament over the last few seasons and had a very good A-Team series against Sri Lanka last year,” Browne pointed out. “His hundred over the weekend for the WICB President’s XI against the Pakistanis helped to fortify in our minds that he has a place in our squad. He gives us the option of a solid middle-order batsman around whom our more free-scoring players can bat.” Vishal managed over 700 runs last season and followed up with a superb 161 for West Indies A against Sri Lanka A in Pallekele last October. However, his returns this season have been poor, with just 317 runs at an average of 26. Ever since selectors axed the long-serving Shiv Chanderpaul two years ago, they have been without a steady hand in the middle order, and with Marlon Samuels dropped and Darren Bravo’s continued exile from the squad, Vishal is being viewed as a solution to the middle order. His Guyana Jaguars teammate Shimron Hetmyer has also found space in the squad following a season that yielded 496 runs, and Browne said the Youth World Cup captain was one for the future. “Shimron has shown a lot of maturity during this season of regional games and also within our A team,” Browne explained. “It is really satisfying to see someone that only a year ago was leading our Under-19 squad to the ICC Youth World Cup title progress so quickly to be considered for a place in the squad. “We want to wish the young man well and hope that he, like all the others, can grasp the opportunity when it presents itself.” Middle order stabilitylast_img read more

Continue Reading

The State of Press Freedom

first_imgIPI members, distinguished guests, colleagues …What a privilege it is to welcome you here today. Many of you either were not here or … unlike me … aren’t old enough to remember when IPI held its last World Congress in Cape Town … exactly 20 years ago.How times have changed.Twenty years ago, the vast majority of South Africans had few rights, were excluded from the country’s immense prosperity, and the media were under horrific pressure not to rock the boat. In many other African nations … like Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and Tanzania … journalists struggled under the grip of strongmen. Today, these countries boast some of the most dynamic media markets on the continent.Twenty years ago, we were welcoming new IPI members from a wave of young democracies in Europe … and celebrating the media’s role as guardian of the transition to democracy in many parts of Latin America.Twenty years ago, many of the world’s strongest media were found in the leading economic powers. Today, as they struggle to find their place in the digital world, traditional and new media are thriving in many parts of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East… and might grow even more if freed of the clutches of government control.And speaking of the digital world, we pay homage this year to the 20th anniversary of the invention of the worldwide web.For all the changes these past two decades, the challenges have not gone away… nor has the need for great organizations like the International Press Institute.When IPI was last in Cape Town, it was relatively easy to halt a newspaper… you break the presses, confiscate the press run or put a lock on the newspaper office. That still happens. Just recently in Sudan, security agents confiscated the pressruns of nearly a dozen newspapers. In Egypt, they outlawed the Freedom and Justice newspaper and several broadcasters. In Venezuela, the government restricted foreign currency exchanges that affected imports of newsprint, effectively forcing newspapers to limit pressruns or suspend publishing altogether.Today, digital media is playing the role of the old samizdat. Social media fuelled the Arab Spring, last year’s Turkish protests, and Ukraine’s most recent revolution … but also helped journalists stay ahead of the story.Yet those who fear journalism have kept up the pressure. In Jordan, where we met a year ago, the government blocked scores of websites within weeks after our Congress ended and some of those remain blocked today for not having government licenses. In February, Turkish leaders approved measures that, unless amended, give the government power to block websites without judicial oversight and to engage in mass surveillance of Internet users. The Syrian Electronic Army… an ad hoc hacker group that backs the Assad government… has played havoc with opposition as well as foreign media, including the Financial Times and The New York Times.When IPI was in Ethiopia last year on a press freedom mission, websites of opposition media and human rights groups were blocked. Ethiopian journalists told us that the security forces shut down the government-run mobile phone network whenever they want to pre-empt anti-government demonstrations organized through text messages.Meanwhile, our business remains a profoundly dangerous one. Just look at Syria, the deadliest country for our profession for two years running … 16 journalists killed in 2013 and 39 the year earlier. Dozens more have been wounded or held captive.Even in countries not in the throes of a terrible civil war, like Syria, journalists walk with targets on their backs. In the Philippines, at least 13 journalists died on the job last year, 11 in India and six in Brazil. All in all, IPI tracked 119 journalists killed in the line of duty… a slight decline from the 133 who died in 2012 but nonetheless an appalling toll. So far this year, more than 20 have either been killed while on the job or died while on duty.IPI is not standing idle when it comes to safety. We’ve pushed the Mexican authorities to improve security for media workers covering drug lords and organized crime. We’ve also pressed the government to end impunity by launching swift investigations into attacks or threats against media and journalists.In January, an emergency IPI delegation went to Cairo to urge the government… including the foreign minister and state information chief… to halt indiscriminate attacks on journalists by the police and vigilantes.Yet journalists face other challenges, perhaps less violent, but no less alarming. Governments have an arsenal of laws that are being turned against our colleagues … laws on sedition and terrorism, for instance. Criminal defamation and insult laws are another example. But more about this later.Twenty years ago, South Africans knew all too well the tricks that oppressors use to silence a free press. Back then, the transformation to a multiracial democracy had not yet taken place. South Africa had a brand new constitution when this Congress last met here, but it was untested and one too many laws restricting press freedom remained on the books … and do so to this day. Criminal defamation is one of them.David Laventhol, the IPI chairman at the time, wrote a beautiful speech for the 1994 Congress. He said: “There are many different cultures represented here, but our mission is a common one: to protect the rights of journalists and the free flow of information everywhere. The subject matter for our deliberation is Africa, a continent that is a mighty mix of cultures, religions, politics and changing ways of life. And of course, one special focus is the Republic of South Africa.”“Of all the places we could be on the globe this year,” he continued, “this is perhaps the most appropriate. A changing society which is headed towards multi-racial democracy after generations without it; a country where, throughout all its troubles, courageous people reported and edited and spoke the truth, as best they could under immense pressure and sometimes threats to their personal safety.”I would like to take a moment to honour those South African journalists … those brave enough to fight the injustice of apartheid … including one who is here today … Mathatha Tsedu.  [Round of applause]Mathatha is not alone, by any means. Many African journalists carry on that tradition of determination. Anas Aremeyaw Anas of Ghana and Joseph Mwenda of Zambia as well as our own Ferial Haffajee, who helped make this Congress possible, are some of them. [Round of applause]We are also honoured to have representatives from Al-Monitor, the recipient of our Free Media Pioneer Award, and Mashallah Shamsolvaezin, the courageous Iranian journalist who is our World Press Freedom Hero this year.  Welcome to both.Back to David Laventhol. As he noted in his Cape Town speech, South Africa was preparing for elections. Again today, we are on the eve of elections and their impact on South Africa is no less important. We have just heard Minister Chabane speak on behalf of President Jacob Zuma … we thank him for his warm welcome to South Africa and we are honored to be here in this great land of hope.But we say to President Zuma, please do not cheat us of that hope. Parliament last November approved and sent to the president the Protection of State Information Bill, also known as the “secrecy bill”, which in our view gives too much authority to politicians to determine what is confidential information.  It also lacks a public interest defence, which would directly impact whistleblowers and journalists who obtain information through their confidential sources.We strongly urge the President to veto the “secrecy bill” and send it back to the Parliament for reconsideration – before the election. Doing so would send the message that South Africa is determined to protect freedom of the press and defend the right of the public to access information that affects their lives.There has also been no progress under the African National Congress-led government in banning defamation and insult laws… a horrible legacy of the apartheid era. The Table Mountain Declaration… signed right here in Cape Town in 2007 with IPI’s backing… calls for abolishing criminal defamation and insult laws in Africa. Only two African leaders have signed it… President Issoufou of Niger and President Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia.It’s not too late for President Zuma to add his name and personal commitment to abolish these heinous laws.Doing so is not just important to South Africa. It is important to all of Africa and beyond because it sends the message that Africans can be global leaders on this issue… as Ghana did when it abolished criminal defamation more than a decade ago.Yet for all the progress in Africa … and much progress has been made… terrific challenges still remain.Just look at Ethiopia. Our board members, Ferial Haffaje and Kiburu Yusuf, were there with me when we tried to visit five journalists imprisoned on terrorism charges. When we were there last November, these journalists were being denied access to their lawyers, their friends and their colleagues. One of them, a courageous young woman named Reeyot Alemu, is battling breast cancer from her prison cell. Her struggle and that of her colleagues … Solomon Kebede, Wubset Taye, Eskinder Nega and Yusuf Getachew… brought tears to the eyes of members of our delegation who spoke with those closest to them.Ethiopia’s neighbor, Somalia, remains Africa’s most dangerous country for journalists… at least 24 journalists have been killed there since the start of 2012. Meanwhile, Eritrea’s dictator has literally locked away journalists and thrown away the key… some of our colleagues have languished in prisons for years. Some have died in confinement.This week the world is marking the 20th anniversary of the start of the Rwanda genocide. As a series of commentaries we published this past week showed, some local media played a terrible role in fanning ethnic hatred in 1994. While there is no defence for such hate speech, we are concerned that the Rwandan authorities use that experience to maintain tight control over today’s news media and call on the government to allow independent media to flourish.A few moments ago I mentioned the scourge of criminal defamation and insult laws. In Angola, journalists who step out of line regularly face the cudgel of criminal defamation. Rafael Marques, who will be speaking here at the Congress, wrote a report alleging involvement of high-level government officials in abuses of mining workers. Angolan prosecutors have harassed him for a year, accusing him of criminal defamation. IPI and a coalition of our partners have rallied in his defence… for example, by pressuring the European Union, a main trading partner and aid donor, to demand accountability from Angola’s autocrats for harassing Marques and other journalists.Even in countries with relatively strong constitutional foundations for press freedom, there is a tendency to flaunt laws. Governments in Tanzania and Uganda have dredged up old press laws to suspend newspapers… damaging these publications’ reputations and financial stability.Kenya is another concern. President Kenyatta has signed legislation… the Information and Communication Act… that we believe would lead to state control of news and information during emergencies, plus give the government the power to perform functions currently executed by the country’s Media Council. We’ve protested these measures and Kenyan journalists are not about to have their rights trampled on. They’ve filed legal challenges against the Information and Communication Act on the grounds that it is unconstitutional.Elsewhere in Africa, we’ve led the campaign against the use of sedition laws to arrest and intimidate journalists in The Gambia and Sierra Leone.And in Egypt these past few months, dozens of journalists have been detained, sometimes for days or months without being indicted. Recently 20 were put on trial for charges such as reporting “false news” or aiding terrorists. And IPI member Al Jazeera has borne the brunt of the government’s wrath, with no less than four journalists still in jail on trumped-up charges.Elsewhere, Morocco has to stand out as one of the more bizarre cases we’ve handled in recent months. Ali Anouzla, whom many of you might know as editor of Lakome.com, was arrested last September and is now on trial for “glorifying terrorism”. What did he do? Anouzla published a news article that included a link to a YouTube video posted on the website of El País in Spain. The video was removed by YouTube, but it allegedly accused King Mohammed of corruption and despotism, and urged young Moroccans to engage in jihad. IPI has joined with more than 40 other organizations in calling for the charges to be dropped.In the Middle East, we’ve seen the great promise of the Arab Spring wither in many countries. I’ve already mentioned the terrible death toll for our colleagues in Syria.But the Arab Spring has also delivered some advances for press freedom. Tunisian and Egyptian voters have adopted promising constitutions with strong guarantees of press freedom. We challenge leaders in both countries to live by the spirit of these constitutions and to adjust national laws to the new guarantees … and then abide by those laws.Press freedom is under siege in other areas as well.In the last few months, we have seen upheavals in Venezuela where government forces have assaulted at least 78 journalists. Fourteen national and international journalists were arrested. In some cases, journalists were taken into custody despite showing their press credentials and media equipment. A few were held for hours incommunicado and then released. Some journalists were threatened even as they were freed from detention.At least 13 cases of theft took place… with the police seizing photos and film showing violence between government forces and protesters.  By our count, there were at least 10 separate cases of censorship against national news outlets carried out by the government agency in charge of regulating broadcast media in Venezuela. Colombian news channel NTN24, which has a station in Caracas, was ordered off the air on February 12 after reporting on protests taking place across the country.  At the same time, Venezuelan President Maduro threatened CNN en Español and ordered press credentials be taken away from three of its reporters.Turning to Brazil. Since last year, eight journalists have been killed in incidents directly linked to their work as members of the press. Impunity reigns in Brazil when it comes to crimes committed against journalists. Press freedom advocates report that a law already in place could federalize investigations on crimes against journalists … yet this law is not strictly enforced today. Although there are efforts by Brazil’s Human Rights Secretariat to get input from local press groups, it is our responsibility to bring light to these inconsistencies that undermine freedom of the press.Last year, after years of advocacy by IPI and other groups, the Mexican government finally put into practice two critical institutional measures designed to protect journalist safety and combat impunity. Unfortunately, the government’s performance leaves much to be desired. Just ask renowned investigative journalist Anabel Hernández, whose home was stormed by 11 armed assailants in December. Or the family of Gregorio Jimenez de la Cruz, a Veracruz reporter kidnapped and murdered in February. We remind Mexico that new laws and programmes mean nothing unless they are backed up by action.With respect to the Caribbean, media independence in Cuba continues to be hampered by government officials. At least 19 journalists have been forced into exile since 2008. As IPI’s World Press Freedom Hero, Yoani Sánchez, has said: the journalism community in Cuba must “shed its political commitments and take on the truth as its only obligation.”I am thrilled to report that IPI’s campaign to repeal criminal defamation laws has already met with great success. Last November, Jamaica became the first Caribbean country to completely abolish criminal defamation. Grenada, along with Trinidad and Tobago, have also taken steps to partially decriminalize defamation. We are hopeful that governments in Antigua and Barbuda… and the Dominican Republic… will honor public commitments and follow suit.Despite these fantastic accomplishments, the Caribbean faces several troubling trends on the press freedom front … including a new wave of electronic defamation laws that threaten citizens’ rights to self-expression online. Secrecy laws are another area of concern: under a bill pending in the British Virgin Islands, journalists could face up to 15 years in prison for publishing sensitive computer data.In Asia, too, press freedom has witnessed many successes and too many defeats. The most astonishing success of the last few years remains Myanmar, where only four years ago we had little hope that press freedom may ever become a reality. Today, after the state censorship office was abolished and most journalists and political prisoners were released from prison, the government is in the process of developing a new legal framework for the media that promises to guarantee a good degree of press freedom. Challenges nevertheless remain and, as I speak, four journalists and one publisher are facing trial for revealing state secrets in connection with an article on an alleged chemical weapon factory.In numerous East and South-East Asian countries … older democracies such as Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, India, the Philippines … and newer democracies … such as Indonesia and Mongolia – appear to remain stable and journalism remains strong in its watchdog function.Nevertheless, threats to press freedom linger in the established democracies. For instance, Japan approved a special state secret law in December 2013. The new law was hailed by Washington, which had long pushed Japan to exert tighter control on classified information. But journalists in Japan say the law is too vague and open to abuse … and represents a serious obstacle to the dissemination of information of public interest.China remains a repressive country. More than 30 journalists and bloggers remain in prison in China and foreign journalists have been facing increasing difficulties in getting a visa to work in the country. Despite these challenges, journalists in China have continued to push the limits.Nine journalists were killed last year in Pakistan, 13 in the Philippines, 11 in India… and three in Afghanistan. In many Asian countries, the authorities fail to address threats and crimes against journalists. Violence has become a powerful deterrent to the coverage of certain sensitive issues.The continued forced exile of so many Sri Lankan journalists… and the Sri Lankan government’s repression of critical voices in the country even after the civil war that ended in 2009… raises concerns that democracy may not be restored any time soon. Tragically, 30 years of civil war has left little space for independent news.In Thailand, the editor of the banned Voice of Taksin is serving an 11-year sentence because of two articles he wrote that were perceived as offensive towards the country’s royal family. This case is a reminder of the threat that criminal defamation and insult laws represent for press freedom. Thailand has turned a deaf ear to repeated appeals by international organizations, including the UN, to amend its laws against insulting the monarchy.There is little progress to report in Central Asia… where governments use an arsenal of tactics to intimidate and silence journalists, including imprisonment, criminal charges, forced closure of newspapers, the blocking of websites… and impunity in crimes against journalists.In Europe, former Soviet republics remain some of the most difficult in which to practice journalism.Impunity flourishes in Russia, where the vast majority of the 64 journalists’ deaths IPI that has recorded there since 1997 remain unsolved. Four journalists died in connection with their work in 2013… two gunned down, two succumbing to the effects of savage beatings they suffered years ago.Since Vladimir Putin’s return to the presidency in 2012, Russia has re-criminalized defamation, created an Internet blacklist, expanded the definition of treason, prohibited discussion of homosexuality that isn’t negative, converted one of the largest news agencies into a pro-Russian public relations firm, and annexed Crimea, where journalists have been menaced by masked gunmen in uniforms without insignia and pro-Russian militia.Meanwhile, Ukraine still reels from the effects of a revolution in which observers recorded more than 120 attacks on domestic and foreign journalists this year.Belarus remains a totalitarian state where journalists are routinely detained or summoned to appear before authorities, and self-censorship is the norm in the Caucasus, particularly in Azerbaijan, where independent media continue to face pressure.Throughout the Balkans, journalists confronted issues of corruption, media concentration and monopolization, as well as physical attacks. In Greece, SEEMO [South East Europe Media Organization] measured a sharp increase in attacks, many of which were attributed to alleged supporters of the xenophobic, right-wing Golden Dawn party.Journalists in Hungary struggle with the effects of both an ailing economy and legislation centralizing regulatory authority in the hands of parliament, while Turkey remains the world’s leading jailer of journalists. Some 44 are still behind bars, most on what appear to be politically-motivated claims of connections to terrorists or armed groups.Media owners’ economic dependence on government connections continues to stifle reporting in Turkey, as did the reported attacks by police on dozens of journalists as they covered protests that erupted last year following the brutal treatment of demonstrators opposing the demolition of Gezi Park in Istanbul. In recent months, a growing corruption scandal has led to the release online of wiretapped conversations allegedly revealing government willingness to apply direct pressure on both the media and the judiciary to achieve political goals. Authorities went so far as to shut down Twitter and YouTube in an apparent bid to staunch that flow of information ahead of local elections.Media in Western Europe generally fared better. But journalists in Italy still faced attacks and intimidation, as well as the very real threat of imprisonment under criminal defamation provisions – provisions with analogues in criminal codes across the continent.As the United Kingdom continued to deal with fallout from the News of the World phone-hacking scandal and disclosures by Edward Snowden, IPI and other leading international press freedom groups warned of the dangers of previously unthinkable regulatory proposals and of criminal investigations targeting The Guardian, reminding Prime Minister David Cameron that his government’s actions could be used to justify media restrictions elsewhere in the world.The United States was the scene of similarly unthinkable developments. In addition to Snowden’s disclosures, the Justice Department acknowledged that it secretly subpoenaed Associated Press journalists’ records and obtained a warrant for a Fox News reporter’s private communications on the grounds that talking a State Department official into sharing information on North Korea made the journalist a co-conspirator to espionage.U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder issued new guidelines on handling investigations involving reporters, but federal prosecutors continued to argue in court that the First Amendment creates no privilege, at least in criminal cases, allowing journalists to protect a confidential source’s identity. Senators considered enacting a federal law on source confidentiality, but a bill to do so remains stalled – the victim of a political process paralyzed by partisan strife.Meanwhile, the White House’s efforts to control news coverage led 38 U.S. media organizations to sign a letter protesting limits on photojournalists’ access to the president.Twenty years ago, IPI held its World Congress in South Africa … in part to celebrate freedom, but also to show that we stood on guard to defend those freedoms everywhere in the world.The transitions that were beginning in Africa, in Europe, in Latin America and in Asia would not be easy … and we continue to see far too many obstacles to press freedom today. For every Tunisia, with its promising new constitution, there is a Russia, where those in power tighten their grip on the media. For all the successes of our Campaign to Abolish Criminal Defamation in the Caribbean, there are countries around the world that continue to use it in a sinister effort to hush journalists.Just weeks before he became president, Nelson Mandela was here… at the IPI World Congress. He gave a touching endorsement of why IPI and press freedom matter. As tempting as it is to read Nelson Mandela’s gently eloquent speech in full, let me highlight one excerpt that embodies why we are here today.He said: “A critical, independent and investigative press is the lifeblood of any democracy. The press must be free from state interference. It must have the economic strength to stand up to the blandishments of government officials. It must have sufficient independence from vested interests to be bold and inquiring, without fear or favour. It must enjoy the protection of the Constitution, so that it can protect our rights as citizens.”Twenty years on, we still have our work cut out for us. This Congress will demonstrate the challenges, as well as the potential to fight back. Thank you all for your support this past year, your participation in this important congress… and your determination to carry on in the years ahead in defence of journalists around the world.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Continue Reading

PICTURE SPECIAL: BURTONPORT AND KINCASSLAGH WATER SAFETY AWARDS

first_imgA big WELL DONE to all the children who took part in the Burtonport-Kincasslagh water safety this year.The training took place over two seperate weeks at The Blockyard Beach in Keadue and at the Bridge in Cruit.In total 170 swim certificates and 99 rescue and endurance certificates were awarded over the two weeks. A big THANK you to all the instructors who helped out in any way. PICTURE SPECIAL: BURTONPORT AND KINCASSLAGH WATER SAFETY AWARDS was last modified: August 18th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:burtonportKINCASSLAGHwater safety awardslast_img read more

Continue Reading

Canyons alums take steps forward

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Courtney Erdman, who used her maiden name, Renfro, while playing at Canyons, gained conditional playing status on the 2006 Futures Tour after tying for 76th in a field of 312 at last week’s 72-hole qualifying tournament in Lakeland, Fla. Erdman shot 76-73-77 to make the 54-hole cut by a stroke at 11-over par, then finished with a 2-over-par 74 to claim conditional status. Her six-month preparation for the qualifier included Golden State Tour events against men, and women’s city championship tournaments. Notable: High school senior Angela Park, a U.S. Women’s Amateur semifinalist this year and one of the top-ranked junior golfers in the country, was competing in the Futures Tour qualifying tournament while her Torrance High team was winning the Southern Section title with a record-breaking 382 last week. Park, who shot 72-65-73-72 to place fifth in the Futures qualifier at 6-under-par 282, was expected to rejoin her high school team for Monday’s Southern California Regional championship at SCGA Golf Club in Murrieta – the final qualifier for Wednesday’s team and individual state championships at PGA Golf Club in Beaumont. Two former members of College of the Canyons’ women’s golf team have helped raise the program’s profile. Nicole DiSanto, who played for Canyons the past two years and, at 295 yards, was a qualifier for the Re/Max World Long Drive Championship, is one of 11 women selected to participate in Big Break V, The Golf Channel’s reality competition series. DiSanto was selected for the second Ladies Only event of the Big Break series from a field of more than 4,000 applicants. She and the other 10 finalists compete on the north shore of Oahu, Hawaii, in the show that will premiere Feb. 7, with a twist. All 11 contestants arrived in Hawaii for the taping of the show to discover they had to play their way onto the show and that one of them would be sent home after the first competition. Torrance and second-place Wilson of Long Beach advanced to regional play, opening four individual regional berths that had been held by Torrance and Wilson players. Valencia senior Stevy Loy received one of the spots. Loy, this year’s Foothill League MVP, had been a provisional regional qualifier after shooting 81 in the Southern Section individual final at Diamond Bar Golf Club, then losing in a five-way playoff for the final regional berth. Loy joined Valencia teammate Tracy White at the regionals. White qualified with a Valencia-best 80 at the section final. Northern Divisional: Valencia and Hart finished 2-3 behind five-time champion Dos Pueblos of Goleta in the Northern Divisional at Rivier Ridge Golf Club in Oxnard, where the top four finishers qualified for last week’s Southern Section team final. It was the second consecutive section-final berth for the Santa Clarita Valley teams. Loy led Valencia at River Ridge, sharing medalist honors at 73, and UC Riverside-bound Michelle Mannix contributed a 78 as the Vikings shot a school-record 403 and held the clubhouse lead until passed by Dos Pueblos with its final scorer. “We were in there, and then one girl shoots 77 for them,” Valencia coach Andy Raevouri said after two-time section champion Dos Pueblos finished 397. “She careers, and that’s the difference for them, but we were right there with them.” Hart, which defeated Valencia three times this season – twice in Foothill League play and also while winning the Keppel of Montebello tournament – received a team-leading 78 from Eleanna Tan in taking third at 424. Section finals: Tan continued to sizzle for Hart in the team final at Indian Hills, shooting 77 for the lowest score of the 18 players competing for three Daily News-area teams. Hart finished 15th overall at 479, 28 shots ahead of last-place Westlake in the 16-team competition. The top four teams advanced to regional play. Valencia turned in its best section-final effort, placing seventh at 427, led by another strong round from White. White, who shot a personal-best 80 in the Foothill League final to land the league’s fourth and final individual postseason berth, followed with another 80 in the section final to qualify for regional play. She followed that with an 83 in the Northern Divisional at River Ridge and wound up team medalist for the second time in three postseason events when she shot 82 at Indian Hills. Afterward, she wondered how much better that round could have been had she not taken a late peek at her scorecard. “I was doing good up until my last four holes (5-over par through 14),” said the good-natured junior, “and I kinda looked at my score, and I realized I was really close to 79, and then I blew it. I’m happy with the way I played – I just wish I could have broken 80.” Dave Shelburne, (818) 713-3609 dave.shelburne@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Continue Reading

Storm victims get a second chance in Southland

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Editor’s note: This is the third installment in a series about Hurricane Katrina evacuees attempting to rebuild their lives locally. LA PALMA – Finally, everything is moving quickly for Soledad Akli and her family, who moved to La Mirada two months ago to escape the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.Until this week, family members felt like they were trapped in limbo. Finding an apartment within their price range proved difficult – the family did not have money for furniture, and getting help from relief agencies and the government was confusing and difficult.On Thursday, however, the family received the keys to a new apartment in La Palma in Orange County.“We’ve been constantly changing from one place to another,” Soledad, 31, said. “Now, I’m just trying to make it feel like home. Today I’m going to start getting it organized so they (her family) can get comfortable.” Her daughter Daniela, 11, is attending school at St. Paul of the Cross in La Mirada, which helped the family find an apartment.Her husband, Stephan, 36, works at sheet metal manufacturer United States Gypsum in Santa Fe Springs. His employer offered to transfer him and his family to the area after their Jefferson Parish apartment was destroyed by the hurricane.Red Cross and the Federal Emergency Management Agency paid their hotel bill through Dec. 15.It took weeks to find an apartment in their price range. Finally, just days before FEMA’s Dec. 15 deadline to move, the family got the call that they were approved for their new place.Almost simultaneously, FEMA extended the hotel voucher program until Feb. 7.Nova La Palma apartments approved the family for a fully furnished, two-bedroom second-floor apartment. The owner also offered them free rent for six months.Southern California is a lot different from New Orleans, but the family is adjusting, Soledad said.Their new apartment is just around the corner from Knott’s Berry Farm. They already have visited Disneyland, the beach, Universal Studios and the L.A. Zoo.“I like the weather and attractions here,” she said. “There are lots of places to take children. It keeps them from thinking about over there.”“Over there,” their Jefferson Parish apartment was just blocks from a levee. It was also larger and quieter than their new place.But, Soledad said, she likes the light that streams through the sliding glass doors of her new balcony.Oak trees lined the streets of her former neighborhood; now she sees palm trees from her street-front window.When the sun set in New Orleans, Soledad could hear hundreds of chirping crickets; now she hears the whir of passing cars.But she doesn’t miss the mosquitoes or the rain.Her family is spread between New Orleans and Nicaragua, where she was born and fled during the Sandinista-led civil war when she was 9 years old.Before Hurricane Katrina hit, leaving 2 feet of water in her home and destroying everything the family had except some DVDs and clothing that were stacked high, the family planned on moving back to Nicaragua.Soledad has already begun construction on a house there, and wanted to open a restaurant. Stephan, who was born in France and has lived in Amsterdam and New York City, also liked the idea of owning his own business.But Katrina changed everything.“Since I came over here, I see things different,” Soledad said. “I’m thinking about the kids’ future, and I want to go to nursing school.”First, however, Soledad is focused on making their new apartment a home.She lost dozens of her cooking spices, essential for making the jambalaya and rice dishes she did before. These days, they’re eating a lot of take-out food.She also looks forward to spending some time alone with Stephan. Since her friends and family are in New Orleans, Soledad has no one to baby-sit Stephanie, her 18-month-old daughter.For now, she is hanging pictures and unpacking the plastic containers with the family’s belongings.“Last night, Daniela said to me, `Mom, we’re doing it again – starting all over.’ She asked me, `Are we going to move again?’ I told her I didn’t think so.” sandy.mazza@sgvn.com(562) 698-0955, Ext. 3026last_img

Continue Reading

Women’s Soccer Blanks Indiana State, 3-0, For Sixth Straight Win

first_imgDrake has a fast turnaround as it hosts UNI on Oct. 10 at 7 p.m. The Bulldogs and Panthers have battled to three consecutive draws in the head-to-head in-state series. Print Friendly Version UNI 10/11/2017 – 5 p.m. WEST DES MOINES, Iowa – The Drake University women’s soccer team scored three second-half goals in a 3-0 victory over Indiana State on Saturday afternoon in Missouri Valley Conference action. Rebecca Rodgers (Peotone, Ill.) netted a pair of goals to give her a league-leading 11 this year and Kasey Hurt (Ankeny, Iowa) recorded her first goal of the season as Drake won its sixth consecutive match. Next Game: The Valley on ESPN3 “The performance today showed a great amount of character from the team,” Brennan said. “They encountered a lot of hurdles prior to this game due to the weather and the location change but never let these factors affect their focus. We dominated possession of the ball against a very disciplined team and showed excellent attacking variety to break them down.” “Becca (Rodgers) continued to be deadly with her efficiency in front of goal while Brooke Salisbury controlled the game from midfield,” Brennan said. “Our back line was flawless throughout and Kasey was rewarded with a fine goal at the end.” Preview Drake (9-3-1, 2-0-0 MVC) and Indiana State (5-7-1, 0-3-0 MVC) played Saturday after their Friday night contest was postponed due to the main field at the Cownie Soccer Complex being unplayable after heavy rain and lightning hit just 18 minutes in. The match was moved to Saturday on Tiger Field at Valley High School in West Des Moines as the main field at Cownie was still unplayable. Drake assistant coach Kevin Brennan led the Bulldogs in place of head coach Lindsey Horner, who missed the match due to her brother’s out-of-state wedding. Live Stats Full Schedule Roster Saturday’s match was played in a consistent mist in chilly temperatures as both teams battled the elements. Rodgers broke open a scoreless affair in the 72nd minute (72:24) after she took a nice header pass from Hannah Wilder (Wheatfield, Ind.) and flicked the ball with her left foot past Sycamores goalkeeper Brianna Riscossa. Later Rodgers, converted a penalty kick in the 75th minute (75:10) and Hurt fired a direct kick from the right corner into the net in the 87th minute (87:10). Watch Livelast_img read more

Continue Reading

Sharing his love of horses

first_imgFounded in 2008, the Soweto Equestrian Centre is the only one of its kind in Soweto, the biggest township in SA. Enos Mafokate stroking his favourite horse Salmy. Mafokate regards Salmy, 23 years old, as part of his family after their many triumphs together. Sifiso Hlatshwayo and Menzi Buthelezi, holding the saddles they made during the saddler course. (Images: Ray Maota) MEDIA CONTACTS • Enos Mafokate  Soweto Equestrian Centre: Founder  +27 82 330 7030 RELATED ARTICLES • SA horse goes for glory in Hong Kong• South Africa’s shark whisperer• SA puppet company wins a Tony • Gallery: South Africa’s wildlifeRay Maota“I have a dream that one day a student from the Soweto Equestrian Centre will compete for South Africa in the Olympic Games.”This quote stands out on the homepage of the website for the centre, run by former show jumper, Olympian and horse groomer Enos Mafokate.Mafokate (66) is a man in love with horses. He has achieved what many would have deemed impossible – breaking into a white-dominated sport during the height of apartheid in 1960s’ South Africa.One of the high points of his career came when he was asked to travel to the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, as a member of a South African development team. This marked South Africa’s first participation in the event for over 30 years, because of a decades-long international sporting embargo.Mafokate rode in the official parade and although he didn’t compete, his presence at the Olympics was a huge inspiration to himself and to up-and-coming equestrians.“Horses are my life. They have taken me around the world and have made me the man I am today,” said the sporting pioneer.Introducing children to horse-ridingThe land on which the centre is operated was officially handed over to Mafokate by the City of Johannesburg in 2008, making the establishment – in its current state – four years old.Over 700 children have been introduced to horses and horse riding at the centre, with lessons taking place twice a week: on Fridays and Saturdays.The centre also offers courses in essential equestrian skills like saddlery, grooming and general farrier skills.A total of 19 horses live here, including Jojo; Thabazimbi; Polokwane; Mpho; Sediba; Lady D; London Pride; Fabio; and Mafokate’s favourite, Salmy.“Salmy is 23 years old and is like a part of my family. I don’t ride her competitively anymore,” said Mafokate.He added that when she dies, the centre will have a proper burial with a tombstone for Salmy – because to him she is only a horse by name.Conquering barriersMafokate’s passion for horses was realised in the 1960s when he started participating in the elite sport of show jumping. Accomplished against a backdrop of apartheid South Africa, this was no mean feat.His relationship with horses started in his teen years when he got a job with John Walker, a farm owner in Rivonia, north of Johannesburg.“Many white people used to come and picnic at the farm, especially during the December holidays, and I would look after their horses for them while they enjoyed themselves. That’s when my love for horses blossomed,” said Mafokate.In the late 1950s, Mafokate got a job manning the gates at the Woodmead Golf Course, which allowed him to tend to the patrons’ horses while they played golf.He got his first taste of show jumping as a 16-year-old in 1962, working for a Springbok show jumper as the horses’ groom, and in the same year got his first chance to compete.“The people I was working for decided to give us black people a chance at show jumping,” he recalled.Mafokate could only compete against other black jumpers because regulations at the time barred people of different races from competing against each other.“I came first in that competition – wearing overalls.”A year later Mafokate won a riding competition at the Inanda Country Base in Kyalami.Apartheid was in full effect at this point in his career and he had to shelve his show jumping career until 1975 when, he said, some white people “decided to ignore politics”.Mafokate, along with 16 other grooms, were enrolled at the Marist Brothers College, the only school that allowed black people to compete in the sport.He went on to win the Rothmans Derby in 1976 and the championship at the Constantia Show Grounds in Cape Town in 1977 and 1978, and his future seemed set.“I was the first black member of the Transvaal Horse Society, which was based at Kyalami. I was also the first black rider in 127 years to compete in the Pietermaritzburg Royal Agricultural Horse Show in 1978,” said Mafokate.“My colleagues and I were now being called black riders, not grooms. We had attained recognition.”Meeting Princess AnneMafokate became the first sportsman in South Africa to take part in an international sporting event in 1982, after 20 years of sanctions on South Africa, because of the country’s apartheid policy, forced sportsmen and women into isolation.Out of 31 riders, he came fifth at the London Royal International Horse Show. His highlight of the show was coming within a stone’s throw of the British Royal family.“I saw Queen Elizabeth drive herself in a green Rover; Prince Charles play polo and Princess Diana holding a young Prince William. The highlight, however, was seeing Princess Anne, who I knew loved show jumping,” said Mafokate.Mafokate tried to talk horses with the princess, herself an acclaimed equestrian, but was denied the privilege by a bodyguard. The incident troubled him for years.He had to wait until 2011 to see Princess Anne again when he spoke at an event hosted by UK charity World Horse Welfare (WHW).“I went wet around the mouth when I saw her again,” Mafokate told guests at the event.He and Princess Anne spoke briefly but just as Mafokate was enjoying the conversation, the Princess had to speak to someone else.“She said I’ll see you later, but we never spoke again,” said Mafokate.He said, however, sources told him “when she said she’d see you later she meant it.”Princess Anne visited the Soweto Equestrian Centre in April, during a visit to South Africa to mark her mother’s 60th year on the throne.“I never thought she would come to see my centre. When I asked her why she came, she said ‘I came because you started something which no one ever thought could happen in a black township’.”Graduation dayThe centre, the only one of its kind in Soweto, held a graduation ceremony for horse handling and farrier skills and saddle making on 24 April.In collaboration with Avis Car Hire and WHW, the centre brings in overseas trainers and tools to train students in specialist equestrian techniques.The 10-week course, attended by 20 students, is divided into four modules: two three-week courses and another two that run over two weeks.WHW’s Jim Balfour, who helped with the training on the course, addressed the graduates: “Congratulations to you all. Do not forget about what it took to get this certificate, go out there and conquer.”The students came from different parts of the country, including the Eastern Cape, Limpopo and KwaZulu-Natal.Karin Bothma, a horse inspector with the Carthorse Protection Association in Cape Town, said: “I’ve always loved horses but the farrier and grooming course taught me how to connect better with the horses.” Bothma graduated with several distinctions.Christa Smit, sustainability manager at Avis, said that the company supports the equestrian centre because the course was enterprising and contributed to community upliftment.A fun day for children with disabilitiesFormal training is not all that the centre has to offer. The Moonlight Foundation for children with autism recently held a fun day for children suffering from this developmental disorder of the brain, characterised by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behaviour.Siphokazi Mtshotshisa is the founder of the foundation.“On 2 April it was World Autism Day and we decided to treat the children to a fun day which involved horse riding,” she said. “It’s very therapeutic for them.”The foundation seeks to do away with the stigma of autism in the black community as most people do not understand it and say the child is bewitched or crazy, said Mtshotshisa.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Want to Set Your Small Business Up For Success? Do This.

first_imgAs senior vice president of SMB marketing at Salesforce, Marie Rosecrans focuses on empowering small and medium businesses with the tools and resources they need to grow. Before joining Salesforce in 2008, she held positions in customer support, professional services, product marketing, and program management at Oracle, Peoplesoft, Evolve, and Primavera. Marie lives in the San Francisco Bay area and enjoys hiking and traveling with her husband, teen, and tween. How OKR’s Completely Transformed Our Culture Marie Rosecrans How to Get Started in China and Have Success What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star… Tags:#Culture#startup#success China and America want the AI Prize Title: Who … Related Posts Let’s talk about values. Not family values or stock values, but company values: the bedrock of an organization. A company’s core values define it in a way nothing else can. They support the vision and shape the culture. They are the principles and beliefs that define the work. They are what drive the company.Some leaders consider values a soft sell or nice-to-have. Small businesses, in particular, are often hyper-focused on the product in a rush to get to market, forgetting to acknowledge the underlying foundation that helps a company run smoothly. But research shows that companies that lead with their values are better positioned to achieve strong customer loyalty, employee engagement, and team productivity. So if you want to set your business up for growth and long-term success, you’ve got to take time to focus on values.First things first: Define your values.Values act as a North Star for the company; they pinpoint what’s important, which then helps determine where to focus individual time and effort. Here at Salesforce, our #1 value is trust, a value which has become the backbone of our company (Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff even spoke at Davos this year about the importance of trust in an organization). That emphasis reverberates through everything we do and defines who we are as a company. Aside from trust, our Salesforce culture is guided by other core values of customer success, innovation, and equality. Every day, we’re personally responsible for living these values and holding each other accountable for them. These are the values that inspire us and help us to grow.So think about the values that matter to your small business; what’s important to consider as you grow? Perhaps consider Benioff’s advice: “What is the most important thing to you in your company? Really look at your value system. What’s #1? If everything is important, nothing is important. You have to choose what is really important to you.”Next, distribute your values.With competition what it is today — intense — companies often lose sight of what drives them. To make sure you’re accountable for your values, you’ve got to make them visible. For years companies have thrown them right on the conference room wall. Other small businesses — like SalesLoft, QGenda, and Thompson Pump — opt to define their values on their websites for easy reference. Some companies go the traditional route with simple values (like trust, respect, and equality), which others take a modern approach with idea statements (like team over self, bias toward action, or focus on impact).A good litmus test for whether a company lives its values is to ask the employees to name them. Would your employees be able to list the company values if asked? Could they tell you how they shine through in their day-to-day roles? If not, it’s time to shout them a little louder.Make those values stick.It’s one thing to write down your values — and quite another to live up to them every day. So once you’ve gone through the motions of defining and distributing your company’s values, you’ve actually got to make them stick. That means “living” your values. Let your values guide the company; they can dictate your decisions, your product direction, and even whom you hire. Values stretch us to be our very best, which is why you’ve got to embed them in how you work.We’ve seen several recent examples where companies have received negative publicity because values were either compromised or not there to begin with. How can core values help you avoid these situations? Here at Salesforce we know that if we frame our work in the context of our values and use those values to drive our decision making, we’ll always make the right decision. And when we do make a wrong decision, we usually find that it’s because we weren’t aligned with our core values. North Star, indeed. Evolve your values over time.Just because you’ve thrown those values on your website doesn’t mean they have to stay there forever. Organizations, products, and people all change. If your current values aren’t tied to the vision, everything suffers — innovation slows, employees become disenchanted, and customers attrit. Something needs to change.So take time every year to think about the status of your company. What’s driving it? What could it be doing better? Where do you want it to go? If you had to choose your core values from scratch right now, would they be the same as the originals? As your small business grows, this is a great exercise to make sure you stay aligned and moving forward.Ready, get set, grow. Competition today is fierce and small businesses must try to differentiate themselves in whatever ways they can. When products are the same or similar, a consumer’s decision is based on what kind of company he or she wants to support. So take some time to think about the values that are important to you. Write them down and shout them out. Make sure they radiate throughout the company. Breathe them in deeply and they will help you grow.What values are important to your company? What’s a small business you know of that truly lives its values? I’d love to know. Tweet me at @mlaxros and let’s discuss.last_img read more

Continue Reading

“Watchmen” and The Art of Creating Nonlinear Stories

first_imgTaking lessons from Watchmen and other nonlinear classics, we deconstruct how you can harness the nonlinear style for your film projects.Long before the 2019 hit show on HBO — or the Zack Snyder faithful big screen adaptation in 2009 — the idea for Watchmen came to writer Alan Moore as a way to repurpose old comics to reflect Cold War anxieties and deconstruct the superhero concept in the original graphic novel series in 1986-1987.In interviews, Moore has cited the experimental author William S. Burroughs for his use of the nonlinear technique as a way to juxtapose different themes, characters, and storylines. Of Burroughs, Moore says, “He suggested rearranging words and images to evade rational analysis, allowing subliminal hints of the future to leak through.”The nonlinear style has since appeared in both film and television adaptations of Watchmen — it’s also a popular storytelling device for filmmakers like Christopher Nolan, David Fincher, and Quentin Tarantino. And while it may be tricky to get your head around at times, when done properly, it can be a powerful storytelling and filmmaking device for your short film, feature film, or video projects.Here’s how to master the nonlinear storytelling technique for your film and video projects.A Tight Script and OutlineBurroughs’s nonlinear “cut-up technique” remains a technique for modern filmmakers. (Image via Blaise.)In Burroughs’s “cut-up technique,” the writer takes a finished story; cuts out pages, paragraphs, or sentences; then tosses everything on the ground as a way to randomly reorder the scenes and narrative.But before you can start making your story into a nonlinear narrative, you need to treat it as a linear one. When done well, nonlinear can be a great device, but more often than not, it comes off as a way to hide a bad script.You should only turn your great idea into a nonlinear one after you’ve put in the work, gotten your feedback, done your hard rewrites, and created a story that you know can stand on its own. From there, take a solid outline and rearrange certain elements for thematic purposes.The Script Supervisor and ContinuityEternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is a great example of a nonlinear, sci-fi love story. (Image via Focus Features).If you’re unfamiliar with a script supervisor’s role is, read up on the ins and outs of why you need one. A script supervisor helps not only during pre-production but also on set, making sure everything from lines of dialogue to blocking to hair and makeup stays consistent.When introducing nonlinear plot devices to your film, it becomes that much more difficult to keep your head on straight. Even if you don’t have the biggest budget or resources for a dedicated script supervisor, having others watching continuity is crucial.If you want great results like the nonlinear sci-fi love story Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, every piece of your meticulously crafted sets and characters need to be consistent, even when traveling across time and between dreamscapes.Consistency of People, Places, and ThemesTarantino’s nonlinear technique in the early ’90s contributed to its popularity. (Image from Pulp Fiction — via Miramax.)By the 1990s, the nonlinear timeline and narrative technique was becoming popular among many filmmakers. No one auteur seemed to master this technique better than Quentin Tarantino with 1994’s feature Pulp Fiction. While this post-modern film employs a very unconventional structure, rife with homage and self-reflexivity, it also strives for a remarkable sense of consistency across the people, places, and themes.All the different narratives feel like they’re connected, and in many ways, they are. This is intentional, and it helps that the director is the same person who came up with the idea and penned the script. A complete understanding of the narrative world is essential for the nonlinear device to really feel consistent — like it’s telling a story much bigger than a normal, linear one.Filming Chronologically vs. Non-chronologicallyNolan’s nonlinear technique implements chronological order in a non-traditional manner. (Image from Memento — via New Market Films.)An interesting question many nonlinear filmmakers have to face is the issue of shooting chronologically or not. Traditionally, most films do not get shot in order or scene by scene, simply out of necessity. However, occasionally some directors will try to work this way to help their actors give better performances. With nonlinear projects, though, the question of chronological production becomes a bit trickier.For films like Christopher Nolan’s Memento, which uses a nonlinear technique that basically tells the story backwards, the idea of filming chronologically actually makes a bit more sense. It really comes down to your story and how much time you want to balance between recreating scenes you’ve already shot, or are able to shoot, in the necessary order.Don’t Lose Sight of the Beginning or the EndIn Arrival, the nonlinear time frame is essential to the storyline. (Image via Paramount.)Finally, taking the 2016 sci-fi thriller Arrival as an example, it’s important to never lose sight of the beginning or end of your nonlinear film project. Like any linear project, a film is a journey from point A to point B (with many complications in-between). However, for nonlinear narratives, those points can quickly become confused. Or, in the case of Arrival, they’re actually the same place.Yet, if the goal is to tell the story of the journey, clearly defining those two points — not just for the narrative, but for your individual characters and their arcs — will help you stay on track, even with the many theoretical challenges of telling a story out of order.Cover image from Watchmen (via HBO).For more filmmaking techniques and advice, check out some of these articles below.A Practical Guide to Dutch Angles and Tilted FramingAdobe Offers Look into the Editing of “Terminator: Dark Fate”The Ad Astra Editing Team On Creating “Quiet Intensity” in the EditHow Hollywood Gets the “Film Look” Using Digital CamerasFilmmaking Lessons from the Making of the Sci-Fi Horror Classic “Alien”last_img read more

Continue Reading