Win a luxurious 4night stay at the Westin Hapuna Beach Resort

first_imgWin a luxurious 4-night stay at the Westin Hapuna Beach Resort << Previous PostNext Post >> Tags: Contests, Hawaii, Westin Hotels & Resorts Posted by Sharecenter_img HAWAII — Westin Hotels & Resorts has launched a new contest with Travelweek giving agents a chance to win a 4-night stay at the newly renovated and rebranded Westin Hapuna Beach Resort in Hawaii.The Westin Hapuna Beach Resort has retained all the trademark selling points that make it such a well-loved property, plus it’s now debuting as the only renowned Westin wellness hospitality brand on the Island of Hawaii.The resort stretches along its namesake white sand beach on the Island of Hawaii. The Kohala Coast is known for its world-class shoreline, as well as for many cultural and archaeological gems nestled between centuries-old lava fields. Contemporary style contrasts with lush, manicured gardens and the endless blues of the sky and the ocean.Arnold Palmer designed the award-winning 18-hole Hapuna Golf Course. Two swimming pools, a 6,800-square-foot free-form family pool and an adult-exclusive infinity pool, overlook Hapuna Beach. Four reimagined dining venues are inspired by the island’s bounty.More news:  Carnival Cruise Line enhances HUB app for families and youthFor a chance to experience all this and more, visit the contest page here to enter:http://www.travelweek.ca/contests/big-island-big-sweepstakes/ Friday, September 14, 2018 Travelweek Group last_img read more

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Peace vigils for Nicaragua continue in Costa Rica

first_imgRelated posts:Protests in Nicaragua renew tensions with Costa Rica Safety fears lead CONCACAF to cancel women’s U17 event in Nicaragua PHOTOS: Nicaraguans in Costa Rica gather to support their country during hard times Dialogue struggles forward, protests continue in Nicaragua Facebook Comments PHOTOS: Nicaraguans in Costa Rica on protests in their home countrycenter_img Nicaraguan residents of Costa Rica, Costa Ricans of Nicaraguan descent, and others concerned aboutrecent events in Managua and beyond have continued to show their support through peace vigils held in downtown San José.This weekend’s gathering took place Saturday at the Plaza de la Democracia.Last week, The Tico Times and community news organization Vecinos Activos explored the western San José neighborhood of La Carpio, Central America’s largest binational community, to speak to residents about their take on the events in Nicaragua. Read the piece here.last_img read more

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April 29 2019

first_imgApril 29 , 2019 USDA launches Organic Integrity Learning Center … PRESS RELEASESALINAS, CA – Coastline Family Farms a western vegetable Grower/Shipper with locations in Salinas CA, Yuma AZ and Brawley CA., announced today the formation of a new dry onion growing and packing joint venture with Madison Ranches located in Echo, Oregon.  The new venture will be named Madison-Cox Onions, LLC.Larry Cox, the CEO and grower/owner of Coastline said “My family has been growing red, yellow and white dry onions in the Imperial Valley of California for over 35 years.  With the dynamics of the produce marketplace, we wanted to consolidate our onion sales under the Coastline Family Farms structure and develop an all year round onion program on the west coast.  We have known the Madison family for some time, they have a reputation for producing high quality premium onions in the Hermiston region of Oregon and knew they would be the right partner to help expand our production footprint.”“Larry, myself, and our teams began discussing working together in the Pacific Northwest last fall.  We are very excited about the opportunity to put together a quality oriented, year round onion program.” said Jake Madison, a 4th generation farmer and CEO of Madison Ranches.  “Our two family farming companies are very similar which helps build a strong foundation of trust, shared values and a focus on a customer centric business model”.The Madison-Cox Onions joint venture will produce red and yellow bulb onions in Hermiston Oregon with the first harvest in September 2019 and shipping through March of 2020. Madison Ranches will be responsible for the production, storage, packing and shipping for the new venture. “We started construction this week on our new packing and storage facility which will feature a state-of-the-art, optical grading, sorting and packing line, capable of meeting the needs of our clients with onion bags ranging from 10-50lb.  We focused the design on automation and state of the art equipment in order to deliver a premium product to our customers. ” added Jonathan Miller, General Manager of the Madison-Cox Onions joint venture. You might also be interested in Origine Group and VariCom sign license deal for FR … center_img “Coastline Family Farms will handle the sales and marketing for the joint venture.” said Tonya Giotta, Vice President for Foodservice Sales.  The onion and vegetable sales veteran is joined by Carly Kwak-Bauch, Vice President of Product and Channel Development, both women previously worked together at River Point Farms and were tapped by Coastline to develop a new dry onion business unit.  “The addition of the Madison-Cox joint venture in Oregon, gives Coastline a year-round, integrated west coast supply base. This enables us to provide national and regional foodservice operators, distributors, wholesalers and retail clients with a consistent year-round supply of premium dry onions.” added Tonya.About Coastline Family FarmsCoastline Family Farms was founded in 1991 and is owned by Larry and Tina Cox. The company is a year-round grower-shipper of premium vegetables from California, Arizona and Mexico.  Four generations of the Cox family have actively farmed throughout California for over 95 yrs. Today the company grows permanent, rotational and vegetable crops on over 10,000 acres of farmland in conjunction with a handful of highly respected, quality-focused family growers.  This integrated grower/packer/shipper alignment, provides a product line which includes lettuces (iceberg, red & green leaf, and romaine) and a wide range of vegetables including cauliflower, broccoli, spinach, green onions, dry onions (red, yellow and white) and more.About Madison Ranches Since 1917 the Madison family has farmed the rich soils of the Southern Columbia Basin in Oregon. Today the fourth generation, Jake and Heather Madison manage nearly 10,000 irrigated acres producing onions, vegetables, seed crops, grains, organic crops, cattle, and feed crops.  Continuing the over 100 year tradition of sustainable agricultural farming, the Madison’s use pioneering water conservation practices including  cutting edge irrigation  management systems, aquifer recharge along with aquifer storage and recovery (sub surface water basin replenishment and storage), and green power generation (wind, solar, and hydro). Ed Treacy to take on leadership for PMA’s sustaina … Jazz apples off to Japan to Jazz up Golden Week …last_img read more

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Go back to the enewsletter Marriott Rewards Marr

first_imgGo back to the e-newsletterMarriott Rewards, Marriott International’s award-winning loyalty program, is being expanded to include Delta Hotels and Resorts, giving its 54 million members even more choice and flexibility when they travel. Marriott Rewards members can now earn points or miles and Elite night credits, and redeem for free night stays, at 21 Delta Hotels across Canada, with the brand’s 14 remaining Canadian properties joining the program in late April 2016. Delta Privilege members will also now enjoy the full benefits of Marriott Rewards membership, including the ability to earn and redeem points at over 4000 Marriott hotels globally across 17 distinct brands.“Marriott Rewards members are seeking ways to discover and experience more through travel. Marriott Rewards’ expansion to include Delta Hotels gives our members even more choice when traveling in Canada,” said Don Cleary, President of Marriott Hotels of Canada. “The depth and breadth of the Marriott Rewards portfolio of brands is now even stronger. The addition of Delta Hotels gives our guests more opportunity to experience the benefits of loyalty in ways that reflect their passions and lifestyles.”Delta Hotels features properties located in major Canadian centres of business as well as popular tourist destinations, including its flagship property Delta Toronto, Delta Ottawa City Centre, and the elegant Delta Grand Okanagan Resort.Go back to the e-newsletterlast_img read more

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Rep Kelly introduces resolution urging Congress to oppose Iran nuclear deal

first_img State Rep. Tim Kelly today introduced a resolution urging Congress to oppose the Iranian nuclear agreement while affirming the rights of states to sanction businesses under their jurisdiction.“The agreement currently before Congress doesn’t serve our interests or those of our allies,” said Rep. Kelly, R-Saginaw Township. “Iran isn’t an ally, and has proven that they can’t be trusted by the international community. This deal is far too lenient, and wouldn’t prevent Iran from continuing to develop weapons-grade nuclear technology.”Rep. Kelly said the plan, which was developed by the president of the United States and five other nations, would give Iran access to frozen assets currently being held by foreign banks that could be used to support terrorist groups.“An estimated $150 billion in assets would be freed up under this deal, giving Iran more capital to support terrorist groups,” Rep. Kelly said. “This is a bad deal for America, and needs to be defeated by Congress.“We need to focus on ways to support our allies in this region, and this deal only further alienates them while helping Iran grow stronger, creating fear and an arms race in one of the most volatile parts of the world.”House Resolution 121 has been referred to the House Committee on Military and Veterans Affairs. 18Aug Rep. Kelly introduces resolution urging Congress to oppose Iran nuclear deal Categories: Kelly Newslast_img read more

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Rep Canfield Budget boosts medical care senior programs

first_img State Rep. Edward J. Canfield, D.O., today said House approval of the state budget will benefit communities throughout the state that are underserved by the medical profession. He also applauded increased funding for vital programs for senior citizens.Canfield, of Sebawaing, serves as chair of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Health and Human Services. He said funding for a program to place medical residents in areas lacking sufficient medical staffing will benefit communities across Michigan.“The Early Primary Care program allows second-year medical students to practice medicine in an underserved area of the state. In return, that resident would be paid a salary and part of the student’s college debt would be paid off by local sources,” Canfield said. “After the two years, the residents return to complete their medical education. By working in underserved areas over time allows an experience that can lead to long-term relationships in those areas with the most need.”Canfield also commended the House for increasing funding for all K-12 schools in Huron and Tuscola counties.“Every school in our communities are receiving more money per student than currently allocated, and a majority of our rural schools are receiving even more money to close a funding gap that has existed for decades,” Canfield said. “We are now spending more to advance K-12 education than ever before in Michigan’s history.”Other key elements of the budget include:The 2017-18 budget spends less on the state budget next year than was spent during the current year.Overall growth in spending does not exceed the rate of inflation. Just like families across Michigan, the Legislature is tightening the state’s belt by cutting inefficient programs and eliminating waste in state government.The Legislature addresses the need for more road and bridge repair and maintenance by allocating a record amount of money for transportation and water delivery systems.The budget helps make life better in communities across Michigan by adding money for road repairs, public safety departments, parks and other programs to improve our daily lives.The plan pays down millions of dollars in debt, helping relieve state liability and opening the door for a more secure financial future.We have consistently increased funding for public safety in recent years, and communities will be even safer with 150 more Michigan State Police troopers funded in this budget.##### 20Jun Rep. Canfield: Budget boosts medical care, senior programs Categories: Canfield News,Newslast_img read more

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Rep Maturen introduces bills to help military veterans with taxes ID cards

first_img19Sep Rep. Maturen introduces bills to help military veterans with taxes, ID cards Categories: Maturen News,News State Rep. David Maturen of Vicksburg today introduced legislation to assist military veterans with their taxes and waive a fee related to state of Michigan identification cards.“Our veterans have sacrificed to maintain our freedoms and our way of life here in Michigan and across the United States,” said Maturen, who himself served in the U.S. Army. “I am pleased to introduce legislation that recognizes these sacrifices and shows our gratitude.”While preserving benefits for veterans, the legislation also helps local governments continue to provide police, fire and other vital services.Maturen’s legislation:Exempts veterans from the $10 fee charged for Michigan personal identification cards. The ID cards often are used by those who don’t have Michigan driver’s licenses.Allows local assessors to grant 100 percent disabled veterans property tax exemptions as part of their normal administrative duties, as they do with all other exemptions.Alters how 100 percent disabled veterans get their property taxes exempted. The full exemption remains, but disabled veterans would file for a refund through their income taxes just as other veterans do. This ensures veterans get their property taxes back while making sure local governments are able to collect the money they need to fund services.“This continues the property tax relief for 100 percent disabled veterans, while ensuring local governments have the resources they need to maintain important services veterans and others rely on every day,” Maturen said.center_img ###last_img read more

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Rep Whiteford announces October office hours

first_img03Oct Rep. Whiteford announces October office hours Categories: News,Whiteford News State Rep. Mary Whiteford of Casco Township will sponsor local office hours on Monday, Oct. 16.“Remaining accessible to Allegan County residents is a top priority for me,” Whiteford said.  “Office hours provide a great opportunity to hear from members of the community about issues that matter most to them.”Rep. Whiteford will be available at the following times and locations:Monday, Oct. 169:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Fillmore Township Hall, 4219 52nd in Holland;11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Fennville Library, 400 W. Main St. in Fennville; and1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at J.C. Wheeler Library, 1576 10th in Martin.No appointments are necessary. Those who are unable to attend at the scheduled times, but would like an opportunity to speak with Rep. Whiteford may call her office at (517) 373-0836 or email MaryWhiteford@house.mi.gov.last_img read more

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Rep Matt Hall Raudio on House passage of auto insurance reform legislation

first_img – 0:00:00 / 0:00:00Update RequiredTo play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin. playpause Categories: Audio,Hall Audio,News Rep. Hall talks about House passage of auto insurance reform legislation. 24May Rep. Matt Hall, R-audio on House passage of auto insurance reform legislation – 0:00:00 / 0:00:00Update RequiredTo play the media you will need to either update your browser to a recent version or update your Flash plugin. playpauselast_img read more

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Nonprofit Watchdog Counts on De Blasio for Latino Govt Appointments

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 Shares October 24, 2014; City & State MagazineAccording to Angelo Falcón, the president of the National Institute for Latino Policy, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio will be attending the annual Somos el Futuro fall conference in Puerto Rico, just as he did was he was mayor-elect. Now simply called SOMOS, this annual conference has been held since 1988. Some call it a political junket; others suggest it serves to present the concerns of New York’s Puerto Rican legislators.When de Blasio attended the fall SOMOS conference last year, the mayor was facing criticism from the Campaign for Fair Latino Representation that his lineup of appointments was thin on Latinos. Early on, de Blasio made some high profile Latino appointments, including by Falcon’s count Lilliam Barrios-Paoli, the deputy mayor for health and human services; Carmen Fariña, the schools chancellor; and Gladys Carrión as Administration for Children’s Services (ACS) commissioner, adding up to 26 percent of the mayor’s publicly announced appointments. Since then, Falcón reports, the Latino percentage of de Blasio’s known appointees has fallen to only 12 percent. While Falcón doesn’t argue for exact one-to-one proportionality, he notes that such a low proportion is troubling for a city in which one out of three residents is Latino.Falcón acknowledges that some of the lack of Latino representation may be due to the holdover of some appointees from the Bloomberg administration. Nonetheless, he charges that with the city’s Commission on Human Rights, for example, lacking any Latino members since the end of the Bloomberg administration, “close to ten months into his administration, Mayor de Blasio has not addressed what is a glaring instance of Latinos being ignored.”A politician’s roster of appointees is often influenced by the pressure he or she gets from political peers. Falcón admits as much: “Another problem in bringing this issue to the fore is that Latino members of the New York City Council and the media have not taken this concern seriously.” In Falcón’s view, de Blasio has made strides to diversify city government staffing with the recruitment of blacks, Asians, and women, but Latinos are lagging.So, when de Blasio shows up at the fall SOMOS conference, will the other municipal and state legislators in attendance buttonhole the mayor and ask him why there’s such underrepresentation of Latinos in a city hall he had pledged to make the city’s most diverse?—Rick CohenShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

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Would You Hire an ExFelon The Life Sentence of Being Locked Out

first_imgShare5TweetShareEmail5 SharesFebruary 18, 2015; Waco Tribune-HeraldHow many lawyers would don the proverbial orange jumpsuit and quite literally get into the shoes of their clients? Kent McKeever, a nonprofit attorney in Texas, spent last Lent dressing as an inmate in solidarity with those who are imprisoned. It was on this last day of wearing the suit that McKeever met Juan Morales, a recently released felon who spent time in prison for a marijuana distribution charge.“We’re not all bad people,” Morales said.The chance encounter remained with Keever and ultimately led to the start of a new project working on getting ex-convicts employed once they are released back into society.McKeever, along with Mission Waco’s Meyer Center for Urban Ministries, a group that specializes in providing assistance to the poor, initiated an advocacy program “Fair Chance Hiring Policy” on Wednesday, the first day of Lent, to encourage employers in the Waco area and beyond to hire ex-convicts.The Ministry group ordered orange T-shirts (currently available for purchase) with the words, “We’re not all bad people,” and is encouraging purchasers to wear them during the Lenten season, which ends in April. The shirts have Morales’s prisoner number on the front along with his quote.Many of the individuals the Meyer Center already helps are ex-convicts.“We haven’t really been to the prisons, but prisoners are coming to us,” said Jerrod Clark, a social worker at the center. “They’re imprisoned now. They’re not locked up, but locked out.”As one can imagine, transition from the prison world is not just difficult mentally; it can also be stressful financially. While a prisoner may have left his prison life, his bad deeds unfortunately follow him through his release and on job applications. As mentioned in the Waco Tribune-Herald article, many employers in the area, and certainly nationwide, ask about an applicant’s criminal record on applications and disqualify those who have such a record.While in some states and cities it is illegal for an employer to discriminate based on an applicant’s criminal record, McKeever believes it is not the government’s place to be enforcing such a rule.“I just don’t think that’s city government’s job,” he said. “We’re not here to tell employers what to put on their application form. […] Employers have to see it’s in their best interest. We have changed our policies to help ex-offenders and set an example.”Waco allows ex-convicts to work in the city if more than five years have passed since their conviction. However it does not allow ex-convicts to take jobs “involving vulnerable populations, money or sensitive information.”Morales, the man who inspired the campaign, has been dealing with the very issues the campaign is trying to solve. He has applied to 15 different warehouses for jobs but could not get an interview at a single one. He makes about $500 a week as a supervisor at a lawn care company, but after child support and other expenses, he only has about $250 per week to live on.“There’s a lot of talented people out there who want to live a straight life, but it’s hard when nobody helps you,” Morales said. “When I was in there, a lot of people left, then came back. They tried to get a job, but they couldn’t make it. The easiest step is going back to their old ways.”—Shafaq HasanShare5TweetShareEmail5 Shareslast_img read more

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The Influence of Philanthropy on the Presidential Election

first_imgShare20Tweet14Share35Email69 SharesCitizens United Freedom Summit in South Carolina by Michael Vadon May 2015 / Michael VadonAugust 29, 2016; The AtlanticPresidential campaigns used to exalt a candidate’s patriotism and public service, if not sacrifices. However, as Benjamin Soskis points out in “Charitable Judgment,” an article worth reading for its unique analysis of charitable giving over time and for its insights into the intersection today of politics and philanthropy, “Never before, though, has an election season focused so much scrutiny on one particular manifestation of such generosity: philanthropic giving.”Soskis is a fellow at the Center for Nonprofit Management, Philanthropy, and Policy at George Mason University. He is also the co-editor of the important resource, HistPhil.org, which details the history of the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors.This is the first presidential election in which both major party candidates have their own foundations. It’s also the first year since 1976 that not every presidential nominee (in this case, Trump) has released his or her income tax returns. Voters want to know how much as a percentage of income the candidates are giving to charity and they leave the details of where the money goes for the media to ascertain.Of course, the hyper-scrutiny by the media that the Clinton Foundation (and the plethora of other entities related to the Foundation and the Clinton family) and the Donald J. Trump Foundation receive results mostly in accusations of corruption, exploitation, dissimulation, and prevarication, “territory where the political class is comfortable making judgments.” While a river of information gushing forth about the Clinton Foundation leads to unending suspicion (but no signs of laws being broken), Charity Navigator just awarded its highest rating—four stars—to the institution.There is little discussion about the Trump Foundation compared to the storm that continually rages over the Clinton Foundation because it exists mostly in name only. Despite Trump’s bombast, it has no full-time staff and what little giving it does do is apparently almost entirely self-serving or worse. NPQ newswires about the Trump Foundation go back long before this election cycle. Soskis asserts that America’s tradition of keeping one’s philanthropy a private affair is used by Trump and his team to not answer queries from the media about the foundation and his own personal giving.For both Clinton and Trump, it is unclear if any of this intense scrutiny has achieved any clarity for the voters or a better understanding by the media of the conduct and impact of the candidates’ philanthropy.Meanwhile, the boundaries between philanthropy and politics have been steadily blurring so that attention directed to one realm is almost necessarily drawn to the other. As wealthy donors have increasingly gravitated toward policy advocacy, they’ve found themselves the target of opposition research of the sort that politicians routinely endure. (The Open Society Foundations, funded by George Soros, were recently hacked, likely by the same Russian cyber-goons that hacked Democratic political organizations.) And as substantial private wealth has become a practical prerequisite to holding public office—in 2013, the median net worth of a member of Congress passed the one-million-dollar mark—the political class and the donor class have converged, as the guest-list of any Davos shindig will attest.According to Andrew Carnegie, “It is not expected, neither is it desirable, that there should be a general concurrence as to the best possible use of surplus wealth. For different men and different localities there are different uses.” The same sentiment holds a century later for the Giving Pledge. Gates and Buffett recruit their peers to pledge at least half their fortunes to charity, but they do not attempt to influence where the personal giving is to be focused.There has also been a rise of criticism for mega-gifts being given to the likes of Harvard and Yale. Soskis also points out that new voices for “effective altruism,” such as Peter Singer and GiveWell, explicitly push for causes they think are more worthy than others. But these examples of judging philanthropic behavior remain the exception to the rule.Traditionally, the public has maintained that charity is a quintessentially American virtue and have expected its leaders to practice it. And yet the assumptions and attitudes that have fed the culture of giving in the United States, stemming from a fiercely held commitment to pluralism, impede judgments about the direction of that giving.Americans want to know if candidates are philanthropic. They want to know how much the candidates give away as a percentage of their personal income more than the details about the beneficiaries of their giving. The media want to know the details and especially about any hint of self-dealing. In the end, as never before, philanthropy is influencing this presidential election.—James SchafferShare20Tweet14Share35Email69 Shareslast_img read more

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California Moves to End Cash Bail But New System May Create New

first_imgShare5TweetShareEmail5 Shares“Cook County Bail Bond Reform Action Dirksen Federal Building Chicago Illinois 4-19-18,” Charles Edward MillerAugust 21, 2018; Los Angeles Times“California lawmakers on Tuesday passed a landmark bill that would overhaul the state’s cash-bail system, replacing it with one that grants judges greater power to decide who should remain incarcerated ahead of trial,” writes Jazmine Ulloa in the Los Angeles Times.The proposal, which had already passed in the state’s Assembly, was approved in the State Senate on a 26–12 vote. The bill now heads to Governor Jerry Brown, who is likely to sign the bill into law. Earlier in the week, Brown endorsed the legislation, calling it “an important step forward in reducing the inequities that have long plagued California’s bail system.”As Ulloa writes, the bill “puts the state at the forefront of a national push to change the way courts impose monetary fines and payments on defendants as conditions of their release from jail. But the historic victory has been bittersweet … [as] ardent former supporters argued the final version of the legislation could lead to more people behind bars.”Alexei Koseff of the Sacramento Bee writes that, “The ACLU and other organizations …raised concerns about an expanded process for prosecutors to file for ‘preventive detention,’ blocking the defendant’s release pending a trial, if they believe there are no conditions that would ensure public safety or their appearance in court. The groups argued that suspects will be detained in jail for weeks awaiting a hearing, and that the change gives too much discretion to judges, likely resulting in more people being locked up, not fewer.”The preventive detention language was added to mollify law enforcement groups—namely sheriffs, prosecutors, and police chiefs. With the replacement “preventive detention” procedure in the bill, these groups dropped their opposition and said they were “neutral.” California District Attorneys Association lobbyist Sean Hoffman even opined that the new bill would create a “pretrial system that is safer and fairer than what is in place today.”For its part, the ACLU fears the new risk evaluation system will simply reproduce in new ways the structural racism endemic to the state’s criminal justice system. Other bail abolition advocates now opposing the bill include the NAACP and the PICO community organizing network, San Francisco public defender Jeff Adachi, and University of California, Berkeley law professor Erwin Chemerinsky.This two-steps-forward-one-step-back dynamic is disturbing but, alas, not surprising. California has a long, fraught relationship with criminal justice. In 1994, California voters approved Proposition 184, the so-called “three strikes and you’re out” law with a 71.85 percent “yes” vote. As the Los Angeles Times wrote at the time, the measure was “sweeping,” creating a mandatory minimum sentence of 25 years for a third felony, even if for a nonviolent offense, eliminating plea bargaining and the right of judges to grant probation. The LA Times added that it would also “double and triple sentences for thousands of felons annually and ensure that they spend at least 80 percent of their sentences in prison.”Following “three strikes,” the number of prisoners in California increased from what the US Department of Justice estimates was 125,605 in 1994 to 175,512 by 2006. According to the state, as of 2017, the cost to the taxpayer per prisoner is $75,560. In other words, by 2006, just the increase in prisoners was costing the state a little over $3.75 billion a year (in today’s dollars). For activists, much of the past decade has involved walking back the effects of this law. By 2016, the number of prisoners in California had fallen back close to where it was in 1994—at 130,340 people.The case for abolishing cash bail is clear enough. As NPQ’s Sean Watterson wrote, “While waiting for a trial, the accused can lose their job, their custody rights, and their home, all before being convicted of a crime.” Worse still, as Ethan Frenchman, a public defender, explained two years ago to Bourree Lam in the Atlantic, “Money bail coerces clients into pleading guilty. Poor clients would often prefer to plead guilty than sit in jail on an unaffordable money bail awaiting their day in court.”The Sacramento Bee, in an editorial, makes perhaps the strongest case in favor of the legislation. “The median bail amount in California is $50,000, five times the national average. People’s lives will continue to be ruined, as they languish in jail for weeks, months and even years at a time, even though they have only been charged, not convicted.” The Bee adds that, despite the legislation’s failings, one clear benefit is that the “for-profit bail industry will die, eliminating a powerful, deep-pocketed lobbying force at the state Capitol.” In theory then, the bill, by eliminating a reform opponent, makes further progress possible down the road.Many bail abolition advocates, however, are not persuaded. “In order to uproot our exploitative system of commercial bail, California from the beginning needs to commit itself to due process and racial justice,” said Abdi Soltani, director of the ACLU of Northern California affiliate.—Steve DubbShare5TweetShareEmail5 Shareslast_img read more

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St Louis Police Seek Freer Hand to Use Mace and Pepper Spray

first_imgShare6Tweet8ShareEmail14 SharesPaul Sableman [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia CommonsToolsof justice can become inconvenient for those in power when people becomecomfortable wielding them. That seems to be the message of the motion filed bythe St. Louis police department last week asking to lift a restriction on theuse of chemical agents like mace and pepper spray.Let’s start at the beginning: In September 2017, a white police officer named Jason Stockley was acquitted of the murder of Anthony Lamar Smith, who was black and suspected of drug offenses. Weeks of demonstrations in St. Louis followed, and some protestors threw bricks and bottles at police. About 300 people were arrested, but most germane to this situation, about 100 people “testified that they were surrounded [in a process of being corralled known as “kettling”], beaten, pepper-sprayed, and taunted as they kneeled or laid on the ground,” according to Jay Connor at The Root.The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)filed suit against the city “for retaliating against persons engaging in First Amendment-protectedactivity; for interfering with the right to record police officers in publicplaces; for unreasonably seizing them and applying excessive force; and forviolating procedural due process rights by kettling and gassing and spraying themwith chemical agents designed to cause pain and confusion withoutconstitutionally adequate warning.”While a final decision has not yet been reached, District Judge Catherine Perry granted a preliminary injunction against the city that, among other things, limited police officers’ ability to deploy chemical agents. She wrote, “Officers have exercised their discretion in an arbitrary and retaliatory fashion to punish protesters for voicing criticism of police or recording police conduct” and opined that the defendants had a good chance of persuading a jury that this was a habitual activity. The injunction prevents the city from declaring “unlawful assembly” unless there is an actual threat of violence, and regulates the use of chemical agents. (The city’s motion last week complained that protestors had no permit to assemble, but as Judge Perry pointed out, “the City of St. Louis does not require, and will not provide, a permit for protests.”)Last week, the city filed its own motion to reverse that injunction, so that police may deploy chemical agents as they see fit. “The streets of the City of St. Louis during September 2017 were not the Edmund Pettus Bridge,” says the motion, “much as the ACLU and its plaintiffs want the Court to react as though they were.”The motion claims that the ACLU has “inveigled the Court into improvident intrusion into police practices in the City of St. Louis.” That’s insulting enough (to inveigle is to “persuade [someone] to do something by means of deception or flattery,” something the courts generally try to avoid), but the motion also claims that because St. Louis did not erupt into full-scale violent riots, “the community (including plaintiffs, though they may not realize it) owes a debt of gratitude to the vast majority of St. Louis police officers.” No doubt there are many times the St. Louis police provided a service for which citizens might be grateful, but this is not one of those times and the protestors were certainly not grateful to be “drowning in mace,” as one person described it.Whatdoes “improvident intrusion,” the basis of the city’s complaint, really mean?The motion cites “numerous” suits filed against the city related to the “sameconduct” at issue in the ACLU’s suit. (The NewYork Times reports that nearly two dozen lawsuits have beenfiled.) This seems to be the main complaint; the motion explains that “thenumerous damage suits now pending against defendant City, including actionsbrought by former plaintiffs in this case, reinforce the conclusion thatequitable jurisdiction is lacking in this case.” The city also cited previouslyunknown evidence (they motion accuses the ACLU of “telescoping” evidence tosupport their claims) and the fact that St. Louis has experienced no violentriots since 2017. However, the only result of reversing the injunction would beto permit the police greater license to crack down on protests.Erin White of Afropunk sensibly pointed out, “Kinda weird that they’re fighting so hard to regain whathas [been] determined to be abusive tactics instead of finding saferalternatives for dealing with the community.”True,if the only issue at play here were their ability to manage communitydisruption. But reversing an injunction like this would make a statement aboutthe ability of courts to dictate police behavior, about who’s in charge ofensuring justice. That debate is painfully ironic, considering the originalcause of the protest was the failure of courts to provide justice in a case ofpolice violence. But where gains have been found, such as in Judge Perry’soriginal injunction, they must be actively preserved.—Erin RubinShare6Tweet8ShareEmail14 Shareslast_img read more

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Ukrainian pay TV operator Volia has entered an agr

first_imgUkrainian pay TV operator Volia has entered an agreement with TV manufacturer Samsung.Customers purchasing a Samsung TV by the end of September can take services from Volia at a discounted rate. New Volia customers will receive a TV package or the TV Plus internet package free for six months. Existing customers will receive all of Volia’s channels free of charge for six months.last_img

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Bulgarian commercial broadcaster bTV has pulled it

first_imgBulgarian commercial broadcaster bTV has pulled its channels from pay TV operator Bulsatcom’s network after the pair failed to strike a carriage deal, according to local reports.bTV alleged that Bulsatcom has failed to pay fees owed to it and has under-reported the number of subscribers to bTV’s services.Bulsatcom issued a statement to subscribers earlier this week saying it had failed to reach an agreement with bTV and that the latter’s channels would be withdrawn. The operator said it would charge reduced fees to customers while bTV’s channels were unavailable. Bulsatcom has also been in dispute with commercial broadcaster TV7 over fees.last_img read more

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French cable operator Numericable has added two ne

first_imgFrench cable operator Numericable has added two new international  à la carte premium channels to its programming line-up and has launched a new version of its Africain Premium package with new services.Numericable subscribers can now view Channel One Russia for €2 a month, giving access to a mix of movies, news, general entertainment programming and sport.The Arabic cultural channel Iqraa TV meanwhile will be available for €1.50 a month.The existing Africain Premium package has now been renamed  Premium Plus with the addition of two new services: Senegalese general entertainment and cultural channel TFM, backed by singer Youssou Ndour, and film channel Nollywood TV.Numericable’s Africain Premium Plus package now includes 15 channels for €11.99 a month. The Africain package with nine channels costs €6.99 a month.last_img read more

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Russian broadcaster CTC Media has appointed Yulian

first_imgRussian broadcaster CTC Media has appointed Yuliana Slashcheva, the president of Russia-based communications consultancy Mikhailov and Partners, as its new CEO.  Slashcheva is due to start her new role effective August 1 and will succeed Boris Podolsky, who has been at the company for six years – first as chief financial officer and then chief executive officer.CTC Media said Podolsky was leaving “in order to pursue other interests.”“We look forward to working with Yuliana on the next stage of the Company’s development, as we build on the success of our existing channels and services,” said Lorenzo Grabau, co-chairman of CTC Media.Slashcheva said: “The CTC Media brand is one of the most powerful in the market, and this is an exciting time for the development of the global media and entertainment business. I am looking forward to leading and working with the dedicated and talented CTC Media team to build on the company’s success, by accelerating the development of the existing operations and identifying and exploiting new areas of growth.”Slashcheva began working at Mikhailov and Partners in 1994 as a manager and then account director. In 2002 she became head of corporate communications at ESN Group in and in 2004 took on a role as a partner and consultant at BBDO Group before returning to Mikhailov and Partners as president in 2005.In its last earnings announcement in May, CTC Media said its operating income fell 8% year-on-year in the three months ending March 31 2013 as ratings on its four channels dropped, but claimed it was well set for the fall season.last_img read more

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Deutsche Telekomowned Montenigrin service provide

first_imgDeutsche Telekom-owned Montenigrin service provider Crnegorski Telekom has added a wide range of channels from Serbian content provider Pink to its Extra TV service.Crnegorski Telekom is offering a Pink package free to users until November, after which it will be available for €4.98 a month.Existing Pink channels on the platform, Pink M and Pink 2, along with new addition Pink 3, will continue to be avaialble as part of the operator’s Start package.Channels in the Pink package will also include Pink Reality, Pink Premium and Pink Action.last_img read more

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Richard Scott Content security specialist Irdeto h

first_imgRichard ScottContent security specialist Irdeto has named Richard Scott as senior vice-president of sales and marketing. Scott, whose role will encompass strategic planning for key accounts, new business acquisition, developing new growth opportunities, and leading Irdeto’s global sales and marketing team, was previously senior vice-president, global sales and service at Harris Broadcast. In his new role he will be based in Hoofddorp, the Netherlands.“Richard Scott is a high-calibre executive with over 25 years in media technology, and we welcome him to the team during an exciting time in our company,” said Graham Kill, CEO Irdeto.“Richard is both flexible and agile in diverse business situations, which is absolutely essential for a global company in a complex and fast-changing industry. With our rich, over 40-year heritage in media protection, we have embarked on a journey to providing a compelling new suite of solutions and services for the media industry. Richard is joining that journey and helping shape the go-to-market strategy to get us there.”last_img read more

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