Rugby World – November 2011 edition contents

first_imgDUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 24: Jonny Wilkinson of England kicks during the IRB 2011 Rugby World Cup Pool B match between England and Romania at Otago Stadium on September 24, 2011 in Dunedin, New Zealand. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images) [imagebrowser id=18]The World Cup quarter-finals are about to kick off so where better to get the inside track on the Rugby World Cup than from the world’s best-selling rugby magazine, Rugby World, which takes you right to the hear of the action in New Zealand. This month’s issue is a homage to all things World Cup, bringing you features, news and reviews from all the stars making the headlines. We hope you enjoy it!———————————————————————————————————————————————–The Front Row…Jake White on how to win a World CupThe 2011 World Cup bearded wonders,Hotshots – Our pick this month is Henry Slade (Exeter Chiefs) and Tom Brown (Edinburgh)Michael Lynagh talks balls! World Cup balls that is…Paul Wallace relives the greatest result in Ireland’s historyLaurence Dallaglio – England’s World Cup form gives Lol cause for concernSean Fitzpatrick – The Kiwi legend says the All Blacks are right on the moneySpotlights…Louis Deacon – England’s one-club man is becoming his country’s unsung hero in the engine room, says Paul MorganSteven Ferris – The hard-hitting Ireland flanker produced the highlight of the Aussie victory. Duncan Bech reportsLuke Charteris – The World Cup marked a major breakthrough for the Wales lock. Paul Morgan meets him in NZAllan Jacobsen – Paul Morgan enjoys a drink with the veteran Scotland loosehead in the Shaky Isles’ last-chance saloonThe Centres…Jonny Wilkinson – The England star recalls some of the most memorable moments of his careerBrian O’Driscoll – Ireland’s talismanic centre opens up about his hopes and fears for life after rugbyShane Williams – Tries, tours and entertaining room-mates, the Wales winger shares all the detailsChris Paterson – Scotland’s record-breaking back has more to achieve before hanging up his bootsWorld Cup A to Z – Players, grounds, headlines and moments that have shaped this great tournament LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Stars of 2015 – Been keeping an eye on those youngsters? Here are some you could be seeing in four years…Las Vegas Sevens – Find out more about rugby’s new star destination, and plan your visit now!Tech zone – Dan Cottrell on how to make the most of watching the prosMini zone – Learn to play fuzzball, and get to grips with the driving maulFitness zone – A workout to keep you lean, plus sweat like never before!Fans on tour – Want to know what it’s really like in New Zealand? Read these fans’ tales from Down UnderThe Big Debate – Russia and the USA start a new conflict – over the best way to help smaller nations developThe Tourist – Bath have big plans and even bigger ambitions, as we find out when we visit the RecBen Cohen – The former England winger is on a mission to stamp out bullying. We find out moreStephen Jones – The RWC refereeing is making Jonesy hot under the collar. See if you agree with his rant…World Cup Tales – Dallaglio, Hastings and Co share some of their whackier moments from past tournamentsThe Backs…Club Guide – Our round-up of action from clubs and schools is back! Plus how to enter Team of the MonthNaked Truth – England scrum-half Richard Wigglesworth never thought he’d end up playing rugbyArmchair Zone – The latest books and products on the rugby marketTour Tale – This night-time fire drill came with a nasty surprise…———————————————————————————————————————————————–Click here to subscribe to Rugby WorldClick here to find out where to buy Rugby World Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.last_img read more

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Top 14 preview: Runners and riders

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Come and get it: Toulon are the reigning Top 14 champs and are favourites again It’s mid-August which means only one thing – the Top 14 is back. Bayonne host champions Toulon in the opening match om Friday evening and then it’s ten months of top-class, gruelling Top 14 action until only two teams are left standing at the Stade de France on June 13.BAYONNEFormer Australian prop Patricio Noriega is the new coach at Bayonne, taking over from last season’s duo of Christian Lanta and  Christophe Deylaud. With a new president also in Manu Merin there is a sense of a page turned at Bayonne after the trauma of last season when events off field almost ended in the club following neighbours Biarritz into the Pro2. With a heavy emphasis on young, local talent, Bayonne will rely on the experience of the likes of Scott Spedding,  Joe Rokoçoko and new signing, Kiwi fly-half Blair Stewart. Only relegated Biarritz scored fewer than Bayonne’s total of 29 tries last season so Noriega has a lot of work to ensure the club remains the Basque country’s representative in the Top 14.Old-stager: Joe Rokocoko will add experience to the Bayonne midfieldAu revoir: Stephen BRETT, Julien PURICELLI (both Lyon)Bonjour :  Blair STEWART (Grenoble),BORDEAUX-BEGLESBoasting the biggest average crowd in the Top 14 last season (beating Toulon into second), Bordeaux-Belges will be playing ten of their matches this season at the 38,000 capacity Stade Chaban-Delmas. Raphael Ibanez and his coaching staff (which includes former England flanker Joe Worsley) have turned Bordeaux into a stylish side whose 58 tries were the most in the Top 14 regular season. Fly-half Pierre Bernard scored 294 points last season and he will face competition this campaign from Lionel Beauxis. With a trio of Perpignan players also arriving, Bordeaux (who finished eighth last season) are an outside bet to reach the play-offs this time aroundAu revoir:  Bruce REIHANA (retired), Poutasi LUAFUTU (Bordeaux-Bègles),Bonjour:  Lionel BEAUXIS (Toulouse), Sofiane GUITOUNE, Bertrand GUIRY, Sebastien TAOFIFENUA (all Perpignan), Francisco  GOMEZ KODELA (Biarritz)BRIVEIn 24-year-old full-back Gaetan Germain Brive had the leading points scorer in the Top 14 last season. His haul of 299 was five more than the next best, Bordeaux’s Pierre Bernard, and Germain’s accuracy went a long way in ensuring Brive remained in the top flight having won promotion through the Pro 2 play-offs in 2012-13. There have been few upheavals in their squad over the summer with Natal Sharks lock Peet Marais their one big signing. Though they lost only once at home last season, Brive failed to win on the road and that record will need to improve if they’re to avoid a relegation dogfight next spring. So, too, will their discipline, with Brive’s three red cards and 29 yellows last season making them the unruliest club in the Top 14!Au revoir:Bonjour:  Peet MARAIS (Sharks)Key signing: Rory Kockott is a prolific kicker and is much sought afterCASTRESThe only side last season not to lose at home in last season’s Top 14, Castres managed just one victory away from the Stade Pierre-Antoine. Yet despite that deficiency, and some inconsistent form early last season, Castres made it through to their second successive final, along the way ending Clermont’s five-year unbeaten streak at home with a stunning quarter-final victory. Narrowly beaten by Toulon in the Top 14 Final, Castres have waved goodbye to a clutch of class players over the summer but they’ve also recruited wisely in Scotland No 8 Johnnie Beattie and former All Black wing Sitiveni Sivivatu. Despite all the changes in personnel Castres should be challenging for the play-offs again in the spring with scrum-half Rory Kockott at the heart of all their endeavours. Au revoir : Brice DULIN (Racing-Métro), Antonie CLAASSEN (Racing-Métro), Romain TEULET (retired), Anton PEIKRISHVILI (Racing-Métro), Julien TOMAS (Stade Français), Seremaia BAÏ (Leicester), Pedrie WANNENBURG (Oyonnax),Bonjour: Sitiveni SIVIVATU (Clermont),  Paea FA’ANUNU (Montpellier), Johnnie BEATTIE (Montpellier) CLERMONT A new era at the Stade Marcel Michelin with Vern Cotter’s eight year tenure at the club at an end following his decision to coach Scotland. He’s replaced by the duo of Franck Azema and Jono Gibbes, the latter the coach of Leinster last season. Though they’ve lost some high profile players, Clermont haven’t been idle in the transfer market themselves, signing Wales and Lions centre Jonathan Davies, Bath full-back Nick Abendanon and All Black wing Zac Guildford among others. And keep a lookout for fly-half Camille Lopez, impressive in the warm-up matches and pushing to claim the France 10 jersey after missing most of last season with injury.Au revoir:  Gerhard VOSLOO (Toulon), Sitiveni  SIVIVATU (Castres), Lee BYRNE (Newport), Nathan HINES (Sale), Regan KING (Llanelli), Elvis VERMEULEN (retired),Bonjour : Camille LOPEZ (Perpignan), Seb VAHAAMAHINA (Perpignan), Jonathan DAVIES (Llanelli), Zac GUILFORD (Crusaders), Nick ABENDANON (Bath) Leader: With no Vern Cotter, Aurelien Rougerie will assume even more responsibilityGRENOBLE Former Ireland and Leinster hooker Bernard Jackman has replaced Franck Corrihons as coach and he signalled his intent to stamp his mark on the club by taking Grenoble on a summer tour of Argentina where they played two matches against the Pumas. The benefit of that experience was plain to see when they thrashed Harlequins 31-10 on Saturday with new signings Jonathan Wisniewski (fly-half) and Ross Skeate both catching the eye. The club has ambitious plans for the future but in the short-term it’s the defence that needs shoring up: last season only Biarritz conceded more tries than the 52 shipped by the Mountain Men.Au revoir:  Blair STEWART (Bayonne), Rudi COETZEE (retired), Shaun SOWERBY (retired)Bonjour: Jonathan WISNIEWSKI (Racing-Métro), Mahamadou  DIABY (Oyonnax), Jono OWEN (Queensland Reds), Gio APLON (Stormers), Chris FARELL (Ulster), Rory GRICE (Waikato), Ross SKEATE (Agen), Charl MCLEOD (Sharks),Jackson WILLISON (Auckland Blues) LA ROCHELLEA survey of Top 14 coaches this week revealed that La Rochelle are favourites for the drop. They won promotion to the top flight by surprising Agen in the play-off final but there is a lot of inexperience in their 39-man squad. Coach Patrice Collazo will be relying much on the nous of former All Black lock Jason Eaton and Bok fly-half Peter Grant. Jean Pascal Barraque, 23, was hailed as the next great French threequarter a few years ago but he’s failed to find his feet at Biarritz and Toulouse. La Rochelle need him to fulfil his undoubted potential if they’re to avoid a rapid return to the Pro2.Au revoir:  Maxime LE BOURHIS (Oyonnax)Bonjour : Jean-Pascal BARRAQUE (Toulouse), Jason EATON (Japan), Peter GRANT (Stormers), Alofa ALOFA (Waratahs), Jone QOVU (Racing-Métro), Romana GRAHAM (Exeter)Lyon-bound: George Smith has been called in to help Lyon’s transition into the Top 14LYON Rugby World’s Play-Off Predictions: Toulon, Racing, Clermont, Montpellier, Grenoble, BordeauxDon’t miss the Top 14 preview in the September 2014 issue of Rugby World – on sale now. TAGS: Highlight Our man in France, Gavin Mortimer, previews the runners and riders and the major comings and goings of all the fourteen clubs Back in the top flight after a three-year absence, Lyon won all three of their pre-season friendlies, including a 24-14 victory over Stade Francais at the weekend. Tim Lane is one of the canniest coaches in the business, while in fellow Aussie Scott Wisemantel and Englishman Dave Ellis he has two sharp operators at his side. Some exciting signings, including Wallaby legend George Smith, former Toulon flanker Pierrick Gunther and Stade’s Jerome Porical, are another reason why Lyon fans should be confident of a respectable showing this season, though they may struggle to equal last season’s try tally in Pro2 of 112 tries in 30 games.Au revoir : Sebastien CHABAL (retired), Julien DUMORA (Castres),Bonjour : George SMITH (Japan), Pierrick  GUNTHER (Toulon), Fabrice ESTEBANEZ (Racing-Métro), Sakiusa MATADIGO (Racing-Métro), Deon FOURIE (Stormers), Stephen BRETT (Bayonne), Jerome PORICAL (Stade Français), Hoani TUI (Exeter)MONTPELLIERBeaten semi-finalists last season, Montpellier looked sluggish in losing to London Irish at the weekend and they’ve lost some imposing figures in their pack what with the departures of the iron Georgian, Mamuka Gorgodze, as well as a couple of Brits in Johnnie Beattie and Jim Hamilton. The Mediterranean club welcome some big names, however, in former Wallaby captain Ben Mowen and French internationals Benjamin Fall and David Attoub. But they might struggle to replicate the impressive form they showed last year in scoring more points – 670 – than any of their rivals in the regular season.Au revoir: Mamuka GORGODZE (Toulon), Johnnie BEATTIE (Castres), Juan FIGALLO (Saracens), Jim HAMILTON (Saracens), Paul GRANT (Nottigham), Paea FA’ANUNU (Castres),Bonjour : Akapusi QERA (Toulouse), David ATTOUB (Stade Français), Tom DONNELLY (Blues), Antoine BATTUT (Racing-Métro), Pat CILLIERS (Stormers), Ben MOWEN (Brumbies), Benjamin FALL (Racing-Métro). OYONNAXThe unfashionable Oyonnax narrowly avoided relegation back to the Pro 2 in May in their first season in the Top 14. Though they enjoyed some memorable wins at home – including defeats over Clermont, Castres and Toulon – Oyonnax won just once on the road last season and managed just 34 tries in their 26 matches. The arrival of the experienced South African forward Pedrie Wannenburg will bolster their pack and boss Christophe Urios will be hoping former Northampton prop Soane Tonga’uiha finds his feet in France after a poor season with Racing Metro.Au Revoir: Mahamadou  DIABY (Grenoble),  Joe EL ABD (retired), Conrad BARNARD (retired).Bonjour : Yves DONGUY (Toulouse), Pedrie WANNENBURG (Castres), Maxime LE BOURHIS (La Rochelle), Maurie FA’ASAVALU (Harlequins), Riaan SMIT (Cheetahs), Soane TONGA’UIHA (Racing-Métro). Lynchpin: If Racing are going to challenge Toulon, Sexton needs to be firingRACING-METROAfter a poor start to last season under the new coaching team of Laurent Travers and Laurent Labit, Racing came good in the second half of the campaign and qualified for the play-offs, beating Toulouse in the quarters before going down to Toulon in the semis. A raft of high-profile signings will further strengthen the club with Springbok fly-half Johan Goosen challenging Jonathan Sexton at fly-half. With experienced old campaigners such as France No 8 Antonie Claassen and Wales lock Luke Charteris also arriving in Paris, Racing could turn out to be the team to most likely threaten Toulon’s dominance of the Top 14 but to do that they’ll have to score considerably more than the paltry 32 tries they managed last season.Au Revoir : Fabrice ESTEBANEZ (Lyon), Jonathan WISNIEWSKI (Grenoble), Benjamin FALL (Montpellier), Soane TONGA’UIHA (Oyonnax).Bonjour : Brice DULIN (Castres), Antonie CLAASSEN (Castres), Anton PEIKRISHVILI (Castres), Johan GOOSEN (Cheetahs), Casey LAULALA (Munster), Luke CHARTERIS (Perpignan). STADE FRANÇAIS The early pace-setters last season, the Parisien outfit tailed off after Christmas and ended in seventh, subsequently losing out to Wasps in a qualification play-off for the Rugby Champions Cup. Patricio Noriega has decamped to Bayonne but Stade welcome former Fijian lock Simon Raiwalui to their coaching staff under the overall command of Gonzalo Quesada. Some notable signings over the summer including  Aussie lock Hugh Pyle, and Stade will be hoping for more consistency from fly-half Morne Steyn this season, who scored just 88 points in 15 appearances.Au Revoir : Jerome PORICAL (Lyon), David ATTOUB (Montpellier)Bonjour: Julien TOMAS (Castres), Adrien OLEON (Mont-de-Marsan), Hugh PYLE (Melbourne Rebels), Raphael LAKAFIA (Biarritz), Martens VAN DER HEEVER (Toulouse).Star man: In-form Steffon Armitage had a standout season for ToulonTOULONThe double champions remain the team to beat this season and in a Midi Olympique survey of Top 14 coaches they came out as favourites to retain their title. There are chinks in the armour, however, with no Jonny Wilkinson and a raft of players (Bakkies Botha, Bryan Habana, Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe and Juam Smith) missing for the first eight rounds of action because of Rugby Championship duty. Having said that, there is still 1,118 caps’ worth of experience in the squad and in Steffon Armitage and Matt Giteau Toulon have arguably the most consistent performers in last season’s Top 14. They open the defence of the Bouclier de Brennus in Bayonne, an awkward fixture that Toulon’s four wins on the road last season were the most (along with Montpellier) managed by a Top 14 side.Au Revoir : Jonny WILKINSON (retired), Alexis PALISSON (Toulouse), Pierrick  GUNTHER (Lyon), Joe VAN NIEKERK (retired), Danie ROSSOUW (retired), Seb BRUNO (retired).Bonjour : Mamuka GORGODZE (Montpellier), Gerhard VOSLOO (Clermont), Guilhem  GUIRADO (Perpignan), Leigh HALFPENNY (Cardiff), James O’CONNOR (London Irish), Romain TAOFIFENUA (Perpignan), Fabien BARCELLA (Biarritz)TOULOUSEHaving failed to reach the Top 14 semi-finals last season for the first time in 21 years, the pressure is on Toulouse and coach Guy Noves. Pre-season preparations haven’t been easy with a heavy 38-12 defeat at Toulon and a raft of injuries to key players. Missing from Saturday’s clash with Oyonnax are Thierry Dusautoir, Louis Picamoles, Luke McAlister and Schalk Ferreira. Englishman Toby Flood and All Black Corey Flynn are among the new faces at Toulouse but it may be that a new coaching regime is what the club really needs to challenge Toulon’s dominance.Au Revoir:  Lionel BEAUXIS (Bordeaux-Bègles), Hosea GEAR (Honda Heat).Bonjour: Toby FLOOD (Leicester), Imanol HARINORDOQUY (Biarritz), Cory FLYNN (Crusaders), Alexis PALISSON (Toulon).last_img read more

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Exeter and England playmaker Henry Slade

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the August 2018 issue of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Downtime with Exeter and England playmaker Henry SladeWhat do you get up to in your spare time?I’ve got a dog so I take him for nice walks. A lot of the boys have dogs so we go out together. He’s called Frank, after Frank the Tank in Old School, and is a cockapoo – he’s four in September.In the summer I play a bit of golf; I don’t like to play if it’s wet! I play a bit of Fortnite – that’s hot right now – and whenever it’s nice weather I get out on the paddleboard. My dog likes it too.What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen or heard on the pitch?There was a guy who used to play for Exeter who didn’t wear pants under his shorts and once, in a maul, his shorts got pulled down so his pride and joy was hanging out. I’m not naming names.Do you have any nicknames?There are a few. There’s the obvious Sladey. I also get called Rusty because part of my hair, it’s not ginger but it goes copper in the summer. In my younger years, when I was about 18, I was pretty skinny and got called Skeletor, but I’ve not heard that for a while.Who are the jokers at Chiefs?Kai Horstmann and Carl Rimmer. Jonny Hill tries to do practical jokes – he’s always up to something.Chiefs joker: Jonny Hill celebrates scoring a try for Exeter (Getty Images)Do you have any phobias?I’ve got two, actually three. The first one is ketchup. I don’t like anything about it – not the taste, not the texture, not the smell. If you get a bit on your finger, the smell stays there for ages, even if you wash your finger. I don’t like brown sauce much, so I tend to go for mayonnaise. Snakes and sharks are my other phobias.An England Women’s player is scared of baked beans…There’s nothing wrong with baked beans. I’m just not good with ketchup.Related: Downtime with England wing Kay WilsonWhat are your bugbears?I have a few! I don’t like people being unorganised. If we’ve got an away game and I’m rooming with Sam Hill, he won’t bring toothpaste, deodorant or shower gel. I have to make sure I’ve got enough for me and him – and he uses a lot.I also don’t like people driving really slowly. I’m not advocating speeding as that’s very bad, but driving ridiculously slowly is frustrating. I’ve got OCD, so also when people are untidy.Do you live on your own? Expensive chairs, in-house chefs and Churchill are all on the agenda in this exclusive interview with Henry Slade TAGS: Exeter Chiefs LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Michele Campagnaro rents a room off me. He’s basically my chef! He’s Italian so he cooks good pasta and makes his own pizza. He’s pretty tidy too. He also plays the guitar and I’ll lie on the sofa and drift off to sleep.Who’d you like to be stuck in a lift with?Have you seen The Greatest Showman? Zendaya – she’s nice. I like Deadpool’s girlfriend (actress Morena Baccarin). It would to be good to have a charismatic leader too, someone like Churchill.Hitch a lift? Actress Zendaya starred in The Greatest Showman (Getty Images)If you could be any of your team-mates, who would it be?I’d like to be someone who’s really quick for a day, like James Short, or Dave Ewers, who’s really strong. Imagine knowing you’re faster than everyone or stronger than everyone.What’s your guilty pleasure?Pancakes with Nutella and whipped cream. Music-wise, Natasha Bedingfield. It’s always good to put Unwritten on.The silliest thing you’ve bought?When I moved into my first house about three years ago, I bought a chair for the corner. It’s my chair for phone calls and is really comfy. When I was looking at it I didn’t really look at the price and when I went up to buy it, it was £900!That’s not the sort of money I’d spend on a chair and I’d just put all my money into the house, so I shouldn’t have got it. But I still have it now and use it a lot.If you could have one superpower, what would it be?Have you seen the film Jumper? I’d like to be able to teleport between places like in that. I hate waiting around in airports so I’d like to be able to click my fingers and be somewhere.Your Mastermind specialist subject?Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter. I’d be pretty confident on either.Do you have any hidden talents?I’m not sure it’s a talent but I’m learning the guitar. I’m trying to get Michele to teach me but he’s a rubbish teacher! All smiles: Henry Slade has a few funny tales to share in this exclusive chat (Getty Images) last_img read more

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Profesora jubilada reflexiona sobre la labor de una vida al…

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events [Episcopal News Service] Durante el Mes de la Historia de los Negros, ENS publicará entrevistas con episcopales que participaron en el movimiento de los derechos civiles y en la obra de reconciliación de la Iglesia.“He pasado la mayor parte de mi vida en la labor de restañar las heridas del conflicto racial” dice Catherine Meeks, mujer de 65 años y capellana de la comisión de antirracismo de la diócesis episcopal de Atlanta. “Me siento muy agradecida de que mi trayectoria haya sido la que ha sido”.Esa trayectoria la llevó de una infancia segregada en pueblitos de Arkansas a las tensiones raciales de los años sesenta en Los Ángeles y a una era aún de tensas relaciones raciales en el “nuevo Sur”.Hija de un aparcero y de una maestra, creció oyendo a su padre hablar de un hermano de 12 años que murió antes de que ella naciera. “Rehusaron darle atención médica en un hospital que estaba a 27 kilómetros [de la casa] de la familia. [Mi padre] tuvo que llevarlo a un hospital de caridad que quedaba a 112 kilómetros. Cuando llegaron allí… la apéndice se le había reventado”.“Crecí en esa atmósfera de que el mundo es realmente hostil hacia nosotros porque somos negros y pobres”, dice ella. “Era aterrador para una niñita. E incluso ahora de adulta, tengo que controlar mis temores, porque me enseñaron que el mundo es un lugar horrible, y ésa es una lección a la que resulta difícil sobreponerse… yo no tenía nada que ver con los blancos, excepto verles como gente a quien temer”.Ella recuerda cuando Emmett Till, un adolescente de 14 años, fue asesinado por supuestamente flirtear con una mujer blanca. “Oí esa historia cuando estaba creciendo, y pensé que era lo más pavoroso que jamás hubiera oído, y casi me morí de pánico”.La escuela era de “segunda categoría”, con libros de texto usados y pedazos de tiza que desechaban de las escuelas de blancos, sin programa de almuerzo escolar, sin laboratorios de ciencias. Ir a la California metropolitana para asistir a la universidad —primero a Compton Junior College, luego a Pepperdine— fue “como si hubiese ido a la luna”.“Es sorprendente que sobreviviera, que fuera capaz de aclimatarme lo bastante para ir a la escuela y llegar a graduarme. Lo único diferente de estar en un país extranjero era que al menos yo sabía hablar inglés”, cuenta ella. Acostumbrada a tener sólo maestros negros, ahora todos sus profesores eran blancos en aulas integradas. “Eso básicamente me llevó a pensar que debía mantener la boca cerrada y tratar de que nadie se fijara en mí”.Algunos profesores notables cambiaron esa actitud, entre ellos el profesor de expresión oral, quien la alentó a que se incorporara al equipo forense.Pero las tensiones raciales eran intensas en Los Ángeles. Los disturbios de Watts tuvieron lugar en el verano que siguió a su primer año en la universidad.  En Pepperdine se hizo miembro de la Alianza Estudiantil Negra y participó en las marchas de protesta cuando un guardia de seguridad blanco mató a tiros a Larry Kimmons, un joven negro de 16 años que había venido al campus a jugar baloncesto.“Era en verdad una época difícil. Había algunos estudiantes negros que realmente querían hacer estallar algo en el campus. Logramos salir de eso sin que nadie más resultara lesionado y logramos que la escuela instituyera una beca en honor de Larry”.Si bien algunos estudiantes blancos apoyaban la lucha por los derechos civiles, la Alianza no alentaba su participación, y ellos no se incorporaban a las protestas, recuerda ella. “Era la época de la separación entre negros y blancos”.“Mi dilema era que yo realmente era cristiana… Creía verdaderamente que se esperaba que intentara amar a la gente, aunque no sabía cómo hacerlo”, cuenta ella. “Había conocido a algunas personas blancas que eran realmente maravillosas, de manera que me resultaba muy difícil tratar de ser separatista… Tenía una amiga negra muy cercana que decía que no confiaba en mí porque creía que era demasiado generosa en mis ideas sobre los blancos, por lo que supuso que yo era una espía”.Para Meeks, el cristianismo resultó victorioso. “En lo más íntimo de mi ser, yo creo que todo el mundo es creado a la imagen de Dios… y mi responsabilidad es responderle al Dios que está presente en los demás de la mejor manera que puedo cada minuto de cada día”.De manera que cuando la gente envía correos electrónicos groseros acerca de sus columnas sobre raza y religión en Huffington Post y Macon (Georgia) Telegraph, “mi respuesta tiene que ser compasiva”, y agrega, “algunos días son mejores que otros”.Desde California, ella regresó al Sur, donde hizo un doctorado en la Universidad de Emory, en Atlanta, y se hizo profesora, llegando a jubilarse finalmente como profesora distinguida de ciencias sociales de la cátedra Clara Carter Acree en Wesleyan College, Macon.“Ha sido en verdad una senda con muchos obstáculos, porque muchas cosas son muy diferentes aquí en el Sur y también en el país, pero muchas cosas apenas han cambiado” señalaba. “Hay aún demasiado sistemas que siguen marginando a los negros, y ahora hemos decidido extender eso a los mexicanos y a cualquier otra persona que consideremos “extraña”.En Macon, Meeks vive al lado de la iglesia episcopal de San Francisco [St. Francis’ Episcopal Church]. Pertenece a la comisión diocesana de antirracismo, que ella cree debe propiciar la reconciliación racial “bajo el palio de la formación espiritual y la espiritualidad” y no “quedarse atrapada en un mero ejercicio de sociología”, apuntó. “Existe una diferencia real en la manera en que enfocas esto en la Iglesia y en la manera en que lo enfocas fuera de la Iglesia”.Sus escritos se concentran en la raza, la espiritualidad, las relaciones humanas. “Estoy realmente comprometida con el empeño de propiciar un diálogo”, afirma. “Creo que tenemos que conversar los unos con los otros. Tenemos que intentar entender de dónde venimos. Si no podemos resolver esto en la Iglesia, no sé en qué otro lugar podamos resolverlo, para ser sincera”.— Sharon Sheridan es corresponsal de ENS. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Por Sharon SheridanPosted Feb 17, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Profesora jubilada reflexiona sobre la labor de una vida al servicio de la reconciliación racial Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

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The Episcopal Church with a Latino face

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Episcopal Church with a Latino face Ethnic Ministries, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] Numbers don’t lie. According to the U.S. Census Bureau 2010 more than half of the population growth in the country is Latino.The Hispanic population grew 43 percent between 2000 and 2010. The Episcopal community in the U.S. is becoming more “Latina” by leaps and bounds, and it is growing from within, with many of its younger members being first-generation Americans.For Carlos de la Torre, this story is personal: this young seminarian immigrated to the U.S. when he was five years old. Today, he feels just as easy with the Peruvian culture of his parents and the culture of the country that opened the doors for them. “There is not a “typical Latino,” he says, “but in general [he or she] is someone who works hard, appreciates diversity and puts it to action.” The church is changing , he adds — there is no choice, “but the change is something good.”The Episcopal Church is assimilating the cultural heritage of its members, from liturgy to the development of ministries for the present and the future.The Rev. Canon Simon Bautista, diocesan missionary for Latino ministries in Washington, D.C., explains that he sees an example with his own children. “The older ones … one can tell that they have that mix … their Latino heritage and being born and raised in the U.S. On one hand they celebrate all things important for U.S. Latinos and they celebrate with just as much passion things related to their culture and the fact that they are Americans.”A new way of being EpiscopalianFor the Rev. Daniel Velez/Rivera, interim rector of the Church of St. Michael and All Angels in Baltimore, Maryland, the reality is quite similar. “The church is integrating … is like intertwining the Latino community with the English-speaking community, forming a single church — diverse, yet under a single roof.”With the Latino population in the U.S. growing four times faster than any other demographic segment, it is not a surprise that the emerging population, inside and out of the Episcopal environment, celebrate Independence Day with fireworks and parades — as a prelude for “Sancocho, tamales and, of course, apple pie.–Cesar Cardoza is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing By Cesar CardozaPosted Jul 4, 2012 center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID General Convention, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

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Falls Church Episcopal celebrates past, looks to future

first_img Comments are closed. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 15, 2013 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Mary Frances Schjonberg says: Tags Property Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL May 15, 2013 at 5:59 pm We can all rejoice the legitimate congregation is back in its historic church and has a fine, new rector who understands the mission of the Church to bring good news and act on it always come first. I predict continued growth and exciting new beginnings for this important Virginia parish. Rector Shreveport, LA Falls Church Episcopal celebrates past, looks to future Episcopal congregation may still face at least one more legal hurdle The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Falls Church Episcopal plans to gather in its historic building May 15 to install its new rector and honor its members and ministries of the past, present and future.Photo: Falls Church Episcopal[Episcopal News Service] When the members of The Falls Church Episcopal formally install their new rector and celebrate their ministry together May 15, it will be just more than a year since they first returned to their historic building, nine months since their rector joined them and five days ahead of what they had hoped would be the last deadline in the parish’s nearly seven-year-old property dispute.“It will be a night where we give gratitude for the past and we express our excitement about the present and the future [and] the great things that God is doing here,” said the Rev. John Ohmer, Falls Church rector, in an interview.Diocese of Virginia Bishop Shannon Johnston, who will lead the service, told Episcopal News Service that the celebration and renewal of ministries “holds tremendous significance” for the congregation.“After returning to their home parish a year ago, the members and leadership of this congregation have invested tremendous energy in their mission and ministry as a congregation. At this service, we will come together to celebrate that renewal and commitment to a very promising future,” he said. “That we can do so in this historic setting, home to so many generations of Episcopalians, is most fitting.”The Rev. John Ohmer, shown here with supplies meant for a homeless ministry, says he felt called to join the congregation because it “really had a compelling vision for what the Episcopal Church could be again in Falls Church.” Photo: Falls Church EpiscopalJohnston said Ohmer “brings remarkable vision and spirit” to The Falls Church. Ohmer, the Rev. Cathy Tibbetts, vicar, and the lay leadership of the congregation “are working together to ensure that The Falls Church continues to grow and thrive in its service to Christ,” he added.Falls Church Episcopal has been moving into its future ever since members of the historic parish in suburban Washington, D.C., voted overwhelmingly in December 2006 to leave the Diocese of Virginia and the Episcopal Church in a theological dispute. Those who decided to leave in fact stayed in the Falls Church property and refused to return it to the diocese.Only 27 of the nearly 2,800 members remained united with the Episcopal Church after the vote. They began meeting in a living room and elected a vestry. Then-Virginia Bishop Peter Lee assigned clergy to the group and soon Falls Church Presbyterian across the street from Episcopal Church property offered them worship space in their loft. The group soon outgrew the loft and moved twice to larger Presbyterian spaces.“The Presbyterians were absolutely amazing,” said parishioner Matt Rhodes. “We’re still involved with the shared ministry they do with the homeless.”The average Sunday attendance soon grew to between 80 and 100, and from the beginning, Ohmer said, the Episcopalians “really had a compelling vision for what the Episcopal Church could be again in Falls Church.”He added that he doubted that any of them expected to spend nearly seven years in a legal dispute over the church property that eventually went to the state Supreme Court. The Falls Church was one of 11 congregations in the diocese in which a majority of members voted to disaffiliate from the diocese and the Episcopal Church. Over the years, all but Falls Church Anglican had settled their property conflicts with the diocese and the church after judicial decisions in favor of the diocese and the church.After a Fairfax County Circuit Court Judge ordered Falls Church Anglican in March 2012 to return the parish property to the diocese, the Anglicans only agreed to allow the Episcopalians to return to the parish building to celebrate Easter (April 8, 2012).However, the Anglican congregation soon thereafter appealed to the state Supreme Court and in the meantime asked the Circuit Court to prevent the Episcopalians from returning again until the high court ruled. The Circuit Court refused and the Falls Church Episcopalians returned to their property on May 15, 2012.On April 18 of this year, the Virginia Supreme Court affirmed the circuit court ruling returning The Falls Church property to the Episcopalians.The Rev. John Yates, Falls Church Anglican’s rector, told that congregation April 28 that the Supreme Court ruling was an “overwhelming rejection of our arguments” and “reduces our legal options drastically.”“Unless we can discern that there are further means of appeal which make good sense, then we can say that it is clear – we will not be returning to our old property” or recovering little of the funds that are part of the dispute, he wrote.And in his weekly message for the week of May 19, available on the Anglican congregation’s website May 15, Yates said: “We have received further confirmation that the courts are not likely to reverse last year’s ruling.” He explained why the congregation’s leaders are “willing to lose our property and move ahead into an uncertain, unclear future.”Still, Falls Church Anglican has until May 20 to ask the Supreme Court for a rehearing on its decision and a May 10 letter from the congregation’s two wardens and vestry indicated that the church will ask that court to reconsider its ruling. The Anglican congregation’s lawyers told the vestry that the Supreme Court based its ruling “on an argument that had never, in seven years of court proceedings, been presented by the other side” and that they had not been able to address, according to the letter. Thus, the vestry said it will be “filing a short [rehearing] petition with the court in a few days” as it continues its search for a permanent home.“It was, of course, our hope that they would have decided that it was time to close this long legal chapter, and focus all their finances and energies, and allow us to focus all of our energies, on our ministries,” Ohmer told ENS.Ohmer said that one of his frustrations is how the long legal process has “falsely convinced” some people that Anglicans and Episcopalians are meant to square off against each other “when in fact where we should all be marshaling our energies is in battling the common enemy we both share: that of rampant consumerism in our culture, and a general sense of meaninglessness, hopelessness, loneliness, and purposelessness.”“Those are some of the common enemies that both ‘sides’ have,” he said, “to which the Gospel is an alternative, and I am eager to live into the day where they’re able to focus 100 percent of their energies and we are able to focus 100 percent of our energies and resources on our ministries, which are after all the same ministries.”Ohmer said he spent 13 years as rector of St. James Episcopal Church in Leesburg, Virginia, throwing away any parish profile that came his way, he said, until he saw the one from The Falls Church Episcopal.“There was something about this lovely, hardworking, patient group of people,” he said. “It’s a compelling story of people who really believe in themselves as a faith community that is loyal to the Episcopal Church, loyal to the Gospel and wants to be good news to the community. They’ve been through a really tough time, exiled from their own property for six, almost seven years.”Rhodes and his family felt the same way. When the Rev. Michael Pipkin, who was priest-in-charge early after the split, needed back surgery, a priest from the Rhodes’ parish, Christ Church in Alexandria, was among the clergy who covered for him. Rhodes, who lives a mile from The Falls Church, said his family decided to attended one Sunday in 2008 to give the priest some familiar faces in the congregation.“We never left,” he said.“There’s a lot of enthusiasm, a lot of energy, a lot of growth” that Rhodes said comes from being back in the Falls Church property and the sense of looking outward from the church and into the future that Ohmer brought to the parish.The congregation is discerning how best to be the good news to the community of Falls Church that Ohmer describes, both through outreach ministries such as the homeless ministry with the Presbyterians and through greater use of the church’s buildings. The church opened its doors to support groups, an English as a Second Language class and civic groups looking for meeting and banquet space.In one case, a predominantly African-American congregation that needed a place to mark its first anniversary contacted Falls Church Episcopal and wound up celebrating in its sanctuary. Ohmer said that during the course of planning, they learned that the congregation’s senior pastor had no office and was running the church out of her car and a local Starbucks. She now rents space at Falls Church Episcopal for a minimal cost, he said.Ohmer said they are showing that the slogan “The Episcopal Church welcomes you” is “true about the faith community and it’s true about the buildings and grounds.”“We have a goal that a large percentage of the property is used a large percentage of the time by the wider community,” he said.The growth in congregants — between 180 and 220 people now attend on an average Sunday — has included former members who “left when they saw what was coming in terms of the split” as well as people who have never been part of Falls Church, people new to the area and other Episcopalians “who came to see what we were all about,” Rhodes said. The Sunday school and youth group are growing as young families join, he added.On May 15, the parish will officially welcome the latest group of between 30 and 40 newcomers, Ohmer said, calling them “a very strong outward and visible sign of the new energy and life going on here.”And, while Falls Church Episcopal has been growing and looking outward, and dealing with the protracted legal issues, the parish has had to deal with the aftermath of the split on another more personal level. Families were and still are divided by the decisions of 2006, Ohmer said. In some cases one spouse might attend Falls Church Anglican while the other worships at Falls Church Episcopal.When pastoral concerns arise in those families, Ohmer said, “those kinds of differences simply go away when it comes to pastoral care; we take care of one another’s families.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Zachary Brooks says: The Rev. Fred Fenton says: David Yarbrough says: May 19, 2013 at 5:46 pm Dear Friend in Christ,Do you believe the 39 Articles of Religion are what Christ Jesus requires of us or are they the doctrinal requirements of quite fallible men seeking common ground in faith? Do you believe that in making fuller use of facilities that they are somehow profaned or that their fuller use is driven by a particular theology which differs from your own? While the poor may always be with us, perhaps we should consider that we are all impoverished, each in our own way, and that our particular poverties are mitigated by Christ through the Holy Spirit working among us and with us in many holy mundane ways. It is possible that as much as some among us have material and physical needs to be met, others of us have a need to serve and to nurture and to make better use of our grace-given gifts: it is in a joyful giving of thanks to God through our sharing of needs and gifts that our poverties are mitigated and we come to see that the Bread of Heaven continues to give eternal life….thoughts? Richard Angelo says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Dustin Henderson says: Comments (11) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Marc Kivel says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bull Sullivan says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books May 16, 2013 at 10:40 am How disingenuous, David. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service May 11, 2015 at 12:07 am If that is your stance, and in the US it is necessary to forego the plain teachings of the Bible to be Anglican, as the definition of Anglican is reduced to mere communion with Canterbury, count me out. I will follow Jesus no matter where he leads. I will follow him in the historical Anglican Way, from which TEC’s leadership has departed. TEC is out of communion with the majority of the world’s 80 million Anglicans. TEC leadership is Anglican in name only, not in doctrine. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC May 27, 2013 at 11:38 pm State law varies, of course, from state to state. Claiming that TEC was “right” in suing for the property, when FEWER THAN ONE PERCENT of the congregation wished to remain with TEC doesn’t make it right, or universally legal, and certainly not Christian. Here in Texas, the matter of TEC vs. the Diocese of Fort Worth has been argued before the Texas Supreme Court. The decision is pending. I think the true Diocese of Fort Worth (ACNA) will win. A most telling argument was raised by one of the justices. He said, “To whom would I go if I wanted to buy the property?” All the deeds are held by Bishop Iker. The General Convention holds no deeds.Incidentally, Bishop Iker did the Christian thing. For those few churches who wished to remain TEC, he gave them the deeds. “Go in peace.” Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Mark McDonald says: Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ May 15, 2013 at 9:47 pm The correct figures during the time in the Presbyterian space were 80 to 100. Apologies for the typographical error. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Mark McDonald says: May 15, 2013 at 10:27 pm Falls Church Episcopal Liberated by Virginia Supreme Court Decision“It’s a compelling story of people who really believe in themselves as a faith community that is loyal to the Episcopal Church, loyal to the Gospel and wants to be good news to the community.”The Rev. John Ohmer, Rector, Falls Church EpiscopalI am in perfect agreement that the church property rightfully belongs to ECUSA. We are, after all, a Nation of Laws, many of which, including the lawful principles of the Founding Documents, were written by Anglicans, who were after all, a substantial majority of signers of those documents. Those who remain faithful to the heritage and doctrine of the Articles of Religion, the Lambeth Quadrilateral, and the 1928 BCP Catechism must surrender their attachment to the historic buildings, often constructed and maintained by their family’s generous tithes, and seek to build new tabernacles of worship.And in that statement is my point. The Reverend Ohmer, in his elocution of hierarchy rightly places the “community” and the “Episcopal Church” ahead of the Gospel, even equivocating “loyalty” with “belief and obedience” to God’s Holy Word. In Reverend Ohmer’s theology, the Church exists as a kind of sectarian community center, a place where social justice is meted out in boxes of clothing, hot meals, job counseling, friendship and heart-felt advice, all dictated by the métier of “The Gospel of Jesus Christ as a Social Psychologist” and tinged about the edges with the more palatable tenets of Gutierrez’s and Boff’s Liberation Theology.Hardy the stuff of our Anglican Founding Fathers, more like the plaintive wails of immigrant EuroAmericans, or the Papist rants of late nineteenth century Roman Catholic social reformers. And I might add, all to the good, for we are commanded to care for the widow, the orphan, the prisoner, even to the oath we must affirm of loving our neighbor as we love ourselves. As I read Reverend Ohmer’s words, however, I hear the vocabulary of a progressive reformer, the compassion of the neighborhood organizer, and the diction of the educated social scientist. I do not hear the call to salvation, the truth told of human weakness and sin, the need to repent and most importantly the clear and unambiguous assertion that “We are accounted righteous before God, only for the merit of our Lord and savior Jesus Christ by Faith, and not by our own works or deservings.” Falls Church Episcopal may now officially join the ranks of Toynbee Hall, Hull House and the thousands of other such institutions which have failed, and continue to fail to relieve, let alone eradicate, poverty, pain, depression and despair. They have however made thousands of educated, progressive and guilt ridden “middle class” men and women volunteers feel good, needed and necessary, if not sufficient, and perpetuated the “Idol” doctrine of humanism as a means to an end. And of the priests and ministers who promulgate such uses of the tabernacles of worship in the pursuit of good? Let it be said, were there no God, they would be the heroes of us all. But, as there is a God, only one God; our God, shouldn’t salvation be the goal? Do the humble and meek need to feed, clothed and counseled to be saved? Don’t the scriptures suggest otherwise? Justice and the Law have been served. The way of the world triumphs. Get over it, Anglicans. Find a place to pray, and do so. You lost this tabernacle as the chosen people lost the Temple, you didn’t faithfully obey God. At least, you are not lead into apostasy, your flesh is not torn from you by wolves like sheep set upon without a shepherd. Pray not for your ancestor’s building, but for those who prevailed, those who now occupy it. Absolom, oh Absolom! + + + May 16, 2013 at 6:58 am Congratulations and blessings to Falls Church Episcopal! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ May 15, 2013 at 6:14 pm The article is confusing in that it asserts that ASA was over 800 when the remnant congregation was meeting in Presbyterian space, and now it’s between 180 and 220.It continues to be unfortunate that TEC refuses to work with congregations and dioceses who can no longer in good conscience be part of the Episcopal Church. An amiable parting settlement is a far more Christian response than ejection and pursuit of assets – and keeps Church resources focused on mission rather than legal fees. May 10, 2015 at 11:59 pm Hooray! The Episcopal Church gets the vineyards it did not plant! TEC only has the property and the money because the parishioners gave it before the church became wacko liberal and decided to preach a unitarian universalist theology. While the courts sided with TEC, but in all reality TEC is guilty of theft by deception.Lesson learned. Never trust wolves in sheep’s clothing. Never give money unrestricted to the church. Always make it conditional on the church never adopting policies that violate the clear teachings of scripture, such as electing bishops that do not meet the Titus standards, or taking a pro choice or pro gay marriage position. Whenever possible, never GIVE things to the church. LOAN them so they always remain the personal property of the parishioners.Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Grant Carson says: June 11, 2013 at 9:50 am Why does the writer of this article, presumably someone who is familiar with Anglican polity, keep referring to the Episcopalians and the Anglicans as if they were two different and oppositional things. The Episcopalians are the Anglicans. Those who left have removed themselves from the Anglican Communion, plain and simple and aren’t in any substantial way still Anglicans. I would expect a local paper to be free and loose with the nomenclature but not an official Anglican publication like this. Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

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Siguen festejando la igualdad matrimonial y los fallos judiciales a…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Por Pat McCaughan y Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 5, 2013 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Servicecenter_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET El obispo Andrew M.L. Dietsche, de la Diócesis Episcopal de Nueva York, sostiene una pancarta desde la plataforma de una carroza durante el Desfile del Orgullo Homosexual en Nueva York. Margaret, su esposa, aparece a su izquierda. Foto de Sharon Sheridan para ENS.[Episcopal News Service] Una gardenia blanca en el ojal y un anillo de diamante en el meñique de Steve Price fueron tributos agridulces en medio del multitudinario regocijo de la “Celebración de la igualdad” en la pro catedral de San Juan [St. John’s Pro-Cathedral] el 27 de junio en  Los Ángeles.De Los Ángeles a Nueva York, los feligreses se reunieron a lo largo y ancho de la Iglesia para celebrar, de manera muy pública y también muy personal, después que el Tribunal Supremo de EE.UU. derogara la Ley en Defensa del Matrimonio (DOMA por su sigla en inglés) y declarara inconstitucional la prohibición del matrimonio de parejas homosexuales en California (Proposición 8).Los fallos del tribunal extendieron muchos beneficios federales, que anteriormente les habían sido negados, a parejas del mismo sexo casadas en los estados de EE.UU. que permiten tales uniones y allanaron el camino para que se reanuden los matrimonios de homosexuales en California.“He estado librando esta batalla durante 30 años”, dijo Price, cofundador de la naciente Comunidad Episcopal del Espíritu Santo en Silver Lake, California.Al tiempo de celebrar el poder “experimentar el amor de Dios en este momento los unos con los otros”, Price dijo que su gardenia era un tributo a “los espíritus de todas las personas que no pudieron llegar a la meta”. El diamante era una herencia familiar que él convirtió en un anillo del meñique. Habría sido un anillo de boda, pero su compañero “murió de SIDA, no está aquí para la ocasión”.Otras personas en la celebración llevaban camisetas del orgullo homosexual con la divisa que nos resulta tan familiar: “la Iglesia Episcopal te da la bienvenida”.Mary Glasspool, obispa sufragánea de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles, suscitó exuberantes vítores y un prolongado y estruendoso aplauso —de parte de unos doscientos feligreses que asistían al oficio en Los Ángeles el 27 de junio— tan sólo con sus palabras iniciales: “Han ocurrido muchísimas cosas esta última semana”.“Es interesante advertir cuántas cosas parecen ocurrir a finales de junio”, añadió Glasspool, que en 2009 se convirtió en la primera sacerdote abiertamente homosexual y con pareja en ser electa obispa en la Iglesia Episcopal.Por ejemplo, dijo ella, el 28 de junio es el 44º. aniversario del comienzo de los disturbios de Stonewall, “esa serie de eventos que, para muchas personas, marcó el comienzo del movimiento por los derechos de los homosexuales en este país”.Y “el 24 de junio fue el 40º. aniversario del incendio deliberado de UpStairs Lounge en Nueva Orleáns, donde murieron 32 personas y que suscitó tan poca atención en su momento e incluso una vergonzosa falta de respuesta de cualquiera que ostentara alguna autoridad, incluidos los líderes de las instituciones religiosas”, añadió.Ella le dijo a la jubilosa asamblea que había elegido una de las lecciones de la noche (Romanos 8:35-39) “porque fue el único pasaje de la Escritura que me mantuvo en la Iglesia cuando yo le buscaba solución a mi propia sexualidad y creía que tal vez Dios me odiaba por ser lesbiana”.Pero añadió que, de tener nuevamente la oportunidad, podría haber elegido la parábola de los obreros de la viña (Mateo 20:1-16) porque “dice algo respecto a la  irresistible gracia de Dios dada a todo el que quiere recibirla, y a nuestra humana y muchas veces destructiva dificultad en celebrar los dones que otro recibe, en celebrar nuestra diversidad”.Ella exhortó a los presentes a pasar de “la igualdad a la solidaridad”, a aprender a regocijarse genuinamente con los dones que otros reciben. “¿Cómo podemos trabajar juntos para promover el reino de Dios?”.En muchos lugares de Estados Unidos también se estaba festejando la Semana del Orgullo Homosexual. Muchas celebraciones de la semana se fusionaron con las que provocaron los fallos del Tribunal Supremo.El obispo J. Jon Bruno, de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles, asistido por la diácona Margaret McCauley y la arcediana Joanne Leslie, preside la eucaristía el 27 de junio flanqueado por dos parejas de homosexuales en un oficio en la pro catedral de San Juan “para celebrar la igualdad”. Foto de Janet Kawamoto.En la ciudad de Nueva York, más de 100 personas comenzaron el día en la Misa del Orgullo disco, en la iglesia de San Marcos en el Bowery [St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery]. El oficio comenzó la interpretación de “Sobre el arco iris” [Over the Rainbow] por Earl Giaquinto, que iba ataviado con los colores del arcoíris [representativos del movimiento gay], y terminó con una danza debajo de una luz estroboscópica y reflectores de colores.Con música en vivo que sonaba a sus espaldas, la Rda. Stephanie Spellers, canóniga para la vitalidad misional de la Diócesis de Long Island, celebró la eucaristía llevando puesta la casulla verde de Barbara Harris, la obispa sufragánea de Massachusetts, ya jubilada, y la primera mujer en ser ordenada al episcopado en la Comunión Anglicana.La segunda lectura del día fue un fragmento del falló del Tribunal Supremo que derogaba partes de la DOMA.“Tenemos muchísimo que celebrar hoy”, dijo en su sermón la Rda. Winnie Varghese, rectora de San Marcos. “Cuando el gobierno actúa a favor del pueblo, se percibe como una liberación”.Cuando Jesús afirmó su rostro para subir a Jerusalén, se dirigió hacia el centro del poder, lo mismo que hicieron los profetas, como Eliseo, para “proclamar lo que es justo en las ciudades del rey”, dijo ella. Varghese instó a los fieles a celebrar, pero también a continuar ese papel profético de luchar por los derechos de todas las personas.La Rda. Megan Sanders, rectora interina de la iglesia de San Andrés en Staten Island, reparte la comunión el 30 de junio en la eucaristía ofrecida por el capítulo de Integrity del área metropolitana de Nueva York a los manifestantes del Desfile del Orgullo Homosexual que no tenían oportunidad de asistir a la iglesia antes de participar en el evento a lo largo de la Quinta Avenida. Foto de Sharon Sheridan para ENS.En la calle 38 de Manhattan, la Rda. Megan Sanders, rectora interina de la iglesia de San Andrés [Church of St. Andrew] en Staten Island, celebró una eucaristía programada por el capítulo de Integrity del área metropolitana de Nueva York para los manifestantes que no podían asistir a la iglesia antes de participar en el desfile a lo largo de la Quinta Avenida. Sanders, que se casó recientemente con Kristin Robyn, dijo que había “llorado en mi auto durante todo el trayecto camino al trabajo” cuando oyó la noticia del fallo del Tribunal Supremo. “Estaba muy emocionada, pero también insegura de lo que esto significa y de qué manera protegemos a las personas que no están casadas”.En el desfile, los episcopales de las diócesis de Nueva York y Newark portaban estandartes de la Iglesia delante de una carroza. Andrew M.L. Dietsche, el obispo de Nueva York, y su esposa Margaret saludaban desde la carroza a la multitud que se alineaba a lo largo de las calles y que los vitoreaban y bailaba al son de la música de la carroza. Una pareja de dos hombres, vestidos de blanco, se encontraban [entre los espectadores] debajo de un cartel que decía “Recién casados hoy”. Uno de los novios expresó las palabras “gracias” al paso de la carroza. En varios lugares, entre ellos la iglesia episcopal de la Ascensión [Episcopal Church of the Ascension], hubo voluntarios que les ofrecieron agua a los manifestantes.“Me siento feliz de estar aquí” dijo Dietsche, haciendo notar el apoyo de la diócesis a la igualdad matrimonial y a la plena inclusión de las personas LGBT [homosexuales, bisexuales y transexuales] dentro de la Iglesia. “Creo que la gente percibe [la llegada de] un nuevo día en Estados Unidos, y sólo aspiramos a ser parte de él y celebrar”.Luego del desfile, Dietsche participó y habló brevemente en las Vísperas del Orgullo [Homosexual] en la iglesia de San Lucas del Campo [St. Luke in the Fields].“Estamos presenciando, como personas de fe, un cambio monumental en los corazones y mentes de la gente… a una velocidad pasmosa”, afirmó.La carroza de la Iglesia “es de enorme importancia”, agregó. “Dice que la Iglesia Episcopal te da la bienvenida y ése es un mensaje en extremo importante de la Iglesia a la comunidad LGBT, porque no siempre lo hizo. Tal vez estamos empezando a sanar algo del daño que la Iglesia cometió en el pasado”.La Rda. Barbara Lundblad, pastora luterana y profesora de homilética en el Seminario Teológico de la Unión, en Nueva York, predicó sobre el pasaje de la viuda y el juez injusto del evangelio de Lucas.“Tenemos que seguir importunando hasta que todas las personas del país tengan el derecho al voto y tengan el derecho a casarse y tengan el derecho a ser bien tratadas, incluso las personas solteras”, dijo. “Es posible celebrar y seguir importunando. Puede ser la única manera leal de celebrar en esta época de nuestra historia”.Llevando una estola que hizo para oficiar en su primera boda [de una pareja] homosexual, la Rda. Susan Copley, rectora de la iglesia episcopal de Cristo y de la misión de San Marcos en Tarrytown, Nueva York, participa en el Desfile del Orgullo Homosexual en Nueva York el 30 de junio. Foto de Sharon Sheridan para ENS.Una celebración vespertina el 26 de junio en la Catedral Nacional de Washington fue “una noche jubilosa, llena de risas y lágrimas en la medida en que los que habían padecido de tan gran discriminación disfrutaban de un cambio de rumbo cultural y legal en nuestra marcha compartida hacia la justicia”, dijo el Muy Rdo. Gary Hall, deán de la catedral, en un sermón el 30 de junio.Las campanas de la catedral repicaron al mediodía “como señal de unidad con la comunidad LGBT”, según un comunicado de prensa de la catedral. Centenares de personas se reunieron en la catedral para celebrar los fallos del Tribunal Supremo.Más de cien personas asistieron a un foro de “elementos esenciales” en la catedral de Santa Margarita [St. Margaret’s Church] en Palm Desert, California, en la Diócesis de San Diego, según el Rdo. Lane Hensley, rector de la misma.Hensley, quien dijo que tiene programado oficiar en la boda de una pareja del mismo sexo en septiembre, explicó que el foro tenía por objeto comenzar un diálogo respecto a la viabilidad de vivir conforme a los fallos del tribunal.El 30 de junio, el obispo Mark Holmerud, del Sínodo de la Sierra del Pacífico de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América, predicó en una eucaristía al aire libre del Desfile del Orgullo Homosexual,  justo antes de su 43ra. celebración anual. El principal oficiante de esta  eucaristía fue el obispo Marc Andrus, de la Diócesis Episcopal de California.El día de los fallos del Tribunal Supremo, Andrus escribió en su blog que estar en la ciudad de San Francisco desde temprano en la mañana a la espera del anuncio de Washington D.C. “bajo la mirada de la estatua y el espíritu del martirizado supervisor de San Francisco, Harvey Milk, como hizo notar David Chiu, el actual presidente de la Junta de Supervisores,  era un modo de mostrar gratitud por la obra, el testimonio y el sacrificio de todos los presentes, de todos aquellos en muchos otros lugares, y de aquellos cuya labor echó las bases sobre las que ahora nos alzamos”.Andrus le dio las gracias al clero y a los laicos de la Diócesis de California “que han sido tan fieles en su lucha, durante décadas, por hacer realidad este momento” y a los obispos de las diócesis episcopales de California y a los obispos episcopales de 22 diócesis que se le unieron en la firma de dos testimonios de apoyo [amicus curiae] que se presentaron ante el tribunal en ambos casos.–La Rda. Pat McCaughan y Sharon Sheridan son corresponsales de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Siguen festejando la igualdad matrimonial y los fallos judiciales a través de la Iglesia Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

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Yancy appointed interim missioner for young adult ministry in North…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina press release] The Rev. Stephanie Yancy has been appointed Interim Missioner for Young Adult Ministry in the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. Yancy most recently served as interim rector of St. Luke’s, Durham.Yancy is excited about taking on the interim young adult missioner role, a position expected to last four to six months. Though a different kind of interim ministry from that to which she is accustomed, Yancy believes the goals are the same. “Change is constant,” she says. “I see my role as keeping things going and keeping people focused on mission during the times between settled leaders. I love knowing that our ministries are all connected.”Yancy will also direct A Movable Feast (AMF), a new mobile outreach ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. AMF is focusing upon Durham Technical Community College and North Carolina Central University this semester.Yancy comes to this diocese from the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland, where she was ordained deacon and priest in 2007. After serving as assistant to the rector at St. John’s in Hagerstown, Maryland, Yancy received additional training in interim ministry and served as interim rector for three congregations in Maryland before moving to North Carolina. She is an M. Div. graduate of The General Seminary in New York.“I am thrilled to have a priest with the experience as well as the wisdom and passion that Stephanie Yancy brings,” says the Rt. Rev. Anne E. Hodges-Copple, bishop suffragan for the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina. “I am especially grateful that Stephanie brings a rare combination of warm heart, pastoral spirit and business organizational skills. This will be especially important as we enter this next phase of grant administration.”Yancy began her tenure earlier this week. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Posted Jan 15, 2015 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VAcenter_img Rector Bath, NC Youth & Young Adults Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Yancy appointed interim missioner for young adult ministry in North Carolina Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing People, Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Servicelast_img read more

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Richard L. Nygaard, Federal Court of Appeals judge, ordained deacon

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Richard L. Nygaard, Federal Court of Appeals judge, ordained deacon Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA August 5, 2016 at 12:51 am This ordination speaks volumes to the notion of automatic and absolute retirement ages. Bravo Deacon Richard, bravissimo Bishop Sean! Ad multos annos! Sandra Koenig says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN People August 5, 2016 at 12:39 pm If you can afford it, you can do anything. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Frank Bergen says: Comments (4) August 4, 2016 at 5:31 pm He sounds like a real deacon doing diaconal ministry. What gifts he brings to the church in new ways. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Aug 3, 2016 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Pamela Payne says: The Honorable Richard L. Nygaard, senior circuit judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, was ordained a deacon by Bishop Sean W. Rowe of the Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania in June at Saint Mark Episcopal Church, Erie, Pennsylvania.Nygaard was born July 9, 1940 in Thief River Falls, Minnesota. Now at the age of 76, Nygaard is believed to be the oldest person ordained a vocational deacon in the history of the Episcopal Church. He received a B.S., cum laude, from the University of Southern California in 1969, and was awarded his Juris Doctorate by the University of Michigan in 1971. He is married to the former Martha Jean Marks, and has three children, nine grandchildren, and had the unique experience of being ordained with his great-granddaughter in attendance.In 1991, the American Bar Association received a request from Romania for assistance in preparing their country for a democracy; in developing a constitution and a bill of rights; and in restructuring their judiciary. The International Law Section of the ABA requested that Nygaard act as an advisor to the Constitutional Conferees of Romania, make comments on their constitution, judiciary structure, and bill of rights. Since then, he has been a constitutional consultant for the countries of Albania, Lithuania, Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, and Croatia, basically in the areas of judicial structure and individual rights. He developed a “Charter of Rights and Responsibilities” now in use, to varying extents, in these countries. He declined to participate with the Government in Exile of Somalia because it rejected his recommendations on human rights, religious freedoms and the rights of women. He was awarded a Doctor of Laws Honoris Causa by Edinboro University of Pennsylvania in 1993 for his constitutional work in central and east Europe. Nygaard also studied the ethical, legal, and sociological implications of the Human Genome Project, under the auspices of the University of Virginia, and the National Institute of Health.He has lectured and written essays on topics ranging from legal history to legal philosophy. His book, Sentencing As I See It, was published by Copperhouse Publications in 2000. Nygaard, who has a passion for sentencing and prison reform, has participated in various fora to stimulate interest in the concept of redemption. Through his Prison Library Project, Nygaard has distributed more than 20,000 books to local, state and federal prisons. Comments are closed. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA August 7, 2016 at 5:24 pm Money has nothing to do with it. Deacon Richard has a heart for ministry and service, and I applaud him and his bishop for recognizing Deacon Richard’s dedication to serving God. May God bless and keep you, Deacon Richard. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curt Zimmerman says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

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Presiding Bishop Michael Curry hopes to discuss immigration at Anglican…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Anglican Communion, Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, 1:27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Primates Meeting, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Primates Meeting 2017, Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Refugees Migration & Resettlement Presiding Bishop Michael Curry hopes to discuss immigration at Anglican Communion primates meeting Immigration, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Posted Sep 28, 2017 Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs]  “I am so looking forward to being with my friends and colleagues in the upcoming gathering of the primates,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry stated in a video message.The Primates of the Anglican Communion, of which Curry is a member, will be meeting Oct. 2 to 6 at Canterbury Cathedral in England.Curry shared that he wants to discuss immigration at the gathering.  “I do hope we have an opportunity to talk about migration and immigrations and refugees,” he said.  “Most of our countries are impacted.”Following the recent Episcopal Church House of Bishops meeting, in Fairbanks, Alaska, and the issuance of A Word to the Church focusing on the environment, Curry is also planning to discuss climate change and environment with the primates.More information on the primates meeting is here, and more information on the Anglican Communion is here. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

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