UAAP Juniors MVP Cansino soars in 6th week of NBTC 24

first_imgCONTRIBUTED PHOTOCJ Cansino has put his nightmare of a second round behind him, carrying University of Santo Tomas when it mattered the most.Thus, the newly minted UAAP Season 80 Juniors Most Valuable Player is the week’s biggest mover in a largely intact Chooks-to-Go/National Basketball Training Center 24 power rankings.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Read Next John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding AFP official booed out of forum Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises LATEST STORIES Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PHcenter_img Gilas arrives in Melbourne, gears up for Australia match Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC SJ Belangel, guard, Ateneo (1)Kai Sotto, center, Ateneo (2)Joel Cagulangan, guard, La Salle Greenhills (3)Will Gozum, center, Mapua (4)CJ Cansino, forward, UST (6)L-Jay Gonzales, guard, FEU-Diliman (5)Rhayyan Amsali, forward, NU (7)Dave Ildefonso, forward, Ateneo (8)Aaron Fermin, center, Arellano (9)Clint Escamis, guard, Mapua (10)John Galinato, guard, Chiang Kai Shek (11)Inand Fornilos, forward, CSB-LSGH (12)Warren Bonifacio, center, Mapua (13)RJ Abarrientos, guard, FEU-Diliman (14)Evan Nelle, guard, San Beda (15)Joem Sabandal, guard, Adamson (16)Beirn Laurente, guard, UV (20)Alex Visser, center, SHS-Ateneo de Cebu (17)Terrence Fortea, guard, NU (18)Raven Cortez, center, La Salle Zobel (19)Mac Guadaña, guard, Lyceum (21)Joshua Yerro, forward, UV (N/A)Harvey Pagsanjan, guard, Hope Christian (23)Miguel Oczon, forward, NU (N/A)Every week, a panel of coaches, sportswriters, and a statistician converge to come up with the weekly rankings to determine the top 24 high school players in the UAAP, CESAFI-NBTC, MMBL, and FCAAF tournaments, together with the recently concluded NCAA competition.The players were ranked based on the following criteria: league stats, impact in team, team record, leadership, defense, offense, and level of competition.The top 24 players still on the board for the power rankings in early March will be picked to play in the SM-National Basketball Training Center (NBTC) High School All-Star Game later that month at Mall of Asia Arena.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Willing the Tiger Cubs in two do-or-die games in the crossover semifinals, Cansino once again reminded everyone that he is one of this year’s best high school standouts, barging his way into a spot in the top five.Ateneo teammates SJ Belangel and Kai Sotto remain in the pole positions, followed by NCAA Finals MVP Joel Cagulangan of La Salle Greenhills and NCAA MVP Will Gozum of Mapua.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSouthern bets also made moves thanks to their stellar showing in NBTC Cebu, with Biern Laurente (17th) and Joshua Yerro (23rd) of UV jumping up the ranks.Here is the list for the sixth week of Chooks-to-Go NBTC 24, with last week’s rank in the parenthesis: 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerslast_img read more

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PBL: Delhi Dashers hammer Hyderabad Hunters on New Year’s Eve

first_imgDelhi Dashers routed the Hyderabad Hunters 5-0 in the last Premier Badminton League (PBL) match of 2017 at the Siri Fort Sports Complex on Sunday.Delhi’s tie began on a winning note when Russia’s men doubles pair of Ivan Sozonov and Vladimir Ivanov eased past Indonesia-South Korean combination of Markis Kido and Yoo Yeon Seong 15-9, 15-11.Following that, Delhi’s Vincent Wong Wing Ki defeated Lee Hyun Il 13-15, 15-11, 15-4 in Hyderabad’s ‘Trump Match’ to gain one more point for the hosts. The defeat in the men’s singles contest left Hyderabad’s tally into the negative (-1).WATCHStaring at a drab beginning to the new year, Hyderabad needed Olympic women’s singles champion Carolina Marin to turn up and she did. The two-time world champion lived up to her reputation, getting the better of Sung ji Hyun 15-10, 15-12.In the second men’s singles match, Tian Houwei, playing Delhi’s ‘Trump Match’, defeated B. Sai Praneeth 15-14, 14-15, 15-10 to give the hosts an unassailable 4-0 lead, sealing the tie.In the final match, Ashwini Ponnappa and Vladimir Ivanov went past Pia Zebadiah and Satwiksairaj Rankireddy 15-11, 15-12 to make it 5-0. The win ensured that they end their home leg in an emphatic fashion.(With inputs from IANS)Also watch:last_img read more

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Stars Help Starkey Hearing Foundation Celebrate Annual Gala

first_imgThe Starkey Hearing Foundation celebrated its annual Hear The World Awards Gala late last month.President Bill Clinton, Forest Whitaker, Kristi Yamaguchi, Mel B., Lou Ferrigno, Bill Rancic, Greg Jennings, Tony Hawk, Shannon Elizabeth, Kevin Sorbo, Evander Holyfield, Lennox Lewis, Verne Troyer and many more gathered together to celebrate the incredible humanitarian accomplishments of Sir Richard Branson, Ashton Kutcher, Barbara Bush, Chunli Zhao “Angel,” Jimmy Walker and Dennis and Leslie Hansen.This was a record-breaking year, raising $8 million to help Starkey Hearing Foundation open up the world of sound for thousands around the globe.The evening featured performances by Lionel Richie, Marc Anthony, Matisyahu, Sinbad, Jessica Sanchez, ARIA and Nina Whitaker.Find out more here.last_img read more

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amfAR Raises Over 2 Million At Annual New York Gala

first_imgamfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, raised over $2 million at its annual New York Gala last week at Cipriani Wall Street.The Foundation honored legendary activist and revered entertainer, Harry Belafonte; amfAR supporter and actor, Rosario Dawson; and photographer Patrick Demarchelier for their exceptional contributions to the global struggle against HIV/AIDS. Friends and longtime colleagues of each honoree presented the honors with praising words and admiration – Whoopi Goldberg presented to Belafonte; Chris Rock presented to Dawson; and Anna Wintour presented to Demarchelier.Guests in attendance included Jeremy Piven and Coco Rocha, who opened the night together, Heidi Klum, Naomi Campbell, Chelsea Clinton, Brooke Shields, Marcia Gay Harden, Donna Karan, Karlie Kloss, Toni Garrn, Zachary Quinto, Kelly Rutherford, Kendall Jenner, Vera Wang, amfAR Founding Chairman Dr. Mathilde Krim, and amfAR Chairman Kenneth Cole, among many others.The New York Gala, now in its 17th year, kicked off Fashion Week with a black-tie dinner, live auction, honoree presentations, and Dame Shirley Bassey’s first ever Fashion Week performance. Dame Shirley had guests on their feet from the moment she took the stage and kept them dancing and singing along as she performed “Goldfinger,” “Lady is a Tramp,” “Diamonds Are Forever,” and an encore performance of “I Am What I Am.” Regina Spektor opened the night with a powerful and personal rendition of Harry Belafonte favorite, “Island in the Sun.”A highlight of the night was an appearance by actor and amfAR supporter, Brooke Shields, who announced a $1 million donation from amfAR Trustee Don Capoccia to amfAR’s Countdown to a Cure for AIDS initiative. Inspired guests took out their cell phones and began texting pledges, generating an additional $120,000 for the Cure Campaign.Guests enjoyed bidding on exclusive items during the live auction, conducted by the legendary and debonair Simon de Pury, which raised more than $600,000 on its own. Highlights included:· An exclusive neon work titled “The Time Is Now!” by celebrated British artist Tracey Emin got the auction off to a dramatic start, selling for $140,00 within seconds.· Honoree Patrick Demarchelier generously donated a private portrait sitting, which was presented by Naomi Campbell. After a round of vigorous bidding, Demarchelier announced he would offer two portrait sittings to a pair of competing bidders for $120,000 each.· In celebration of the 250th anniversary of Hennessy, an extremely rare, 250 liter barrel of Collector Blend Hennessy Cognac was auctioned for $150,000. · Heidi Klum modeled a pair of Harry Winston diamond Sunflower Cascading Earrings, which she commented would make a wonderful Valentine’s Day gift for a lucky lady in the audience. After a round of bidding, the 1.94-carat earrings sold for $50,000.· An exclusive photographic print of Andy Warhol by long-time amfAR friend and iconic photographer Christopher Makos rounded out the auction with frenzied bidding.Harry Winston generously served as the event’s presenting sponsor, launching a new and unprecedented multi-event partnership with amfAR. The event’s signature sponsors included Moët Hennessy, M•A•C Viva Glam, and Mandarin Oriental, New York.Chairs of the event included Alessandra Ambrosio, Donald A. Capoccia and Tommie Pegues, Chelsea Clinton, Andy Cohen, Kenneth Cole, John Demsey, Jamie Foxx, Anne Fulenwider, Nina Garcia, Toni Garrn, Milutin Gatsby, Whoopi Goldberg, Nayla Hayek, Donna Karan, Karlie Kloss, Michael Kors, Mathilde Krim, Ph.D., David and Lauren Bush Lauren, John Legend, Cindi Leive, Terry Lundgren, Julianna Margulies, Jeremy Piven, Howard and Cindy Rachofsky, Vincent Roberti, Bill Roedy, and Stefano Tonchi. Vice chairs included Arlen and Michele Andelson, Maria Bogdanova, Ronnie M. E. Budja, Jonathan Canno and Pierce Canno Roberts, Steven Kolb, and Stephanie and John Roberts.The amfAR New York Gala is one of New York City’s most successful and high-profile AIDS benefits. Previous honorees include President Bill Clinton, Dame Elizabeth Taylor, Vanessa Redgrave, Roberto Cavalli, Kenneth Cole, Diane von Furstenberg, Yves Carcelle, Sir Elton John and David Furnish, Clive Davis, Peter Dolan/Bristol-Myers Squibb, Richard Gere, Whoopi Goldberg, Tom Hanks, Janet Jackson, Quincy Jones, Donna Karan, Heidi Klum, Patti LaBelle, Peter Lindberg, Lorne Michaels, Liza Minnelli, Rosie O’Donnell, Howard and Cindy Rachofsky, Vanessa Redgrave, Joely Richardson, Sumner Redstone/Viacom, Natasha Richardson, Bill Roedy/MTV Networks, Carine Roitfeld, Caroline Scheufele, Julian Schnabel, Bobby Shriver, Sharon Stone, Barbara Walters, Robin Williams, and Anna Wintour.Delta Air Lines is the official airline of amfAR. Moët Hennessy is the official wine and spirits partner of amfAR. The amfAR New York Gala is produced by Andrew Boose/AAB Productions.last_img read more

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A recent study out of Oregon suggests emergency me

first_imgA recent study out of Oregon suggests emergency medical responders — EMTs and paramedics — may be treating minority patients differently from the way they treat white patients.Specifically, the scientists found that black patients in their study were 40 percent less likely to get pain medication than their white peers.Jamie Kennel, head of emergency medical services programs at Oregon Health and Science University and the Oregon Institute of Technology, led the research, which was presented in December at the Institute of Healthcare Improvement Scientific Symposium in Orlando, Fla.The researchers received a grant to produce the internal report for the Oregon Emergency Medical Services department and the Oregon Office of Rural Health.Outright discrimination by paramedics is rare, the researchers say, and illegal; in this case unconscious bias may be at work.A few years ago, Leslie Gregory was one of a very few black female emergency medical technicians working in Lenawee County, Mich. She says the study’s findings ring true to what she has seen.She remembers one particular call — the patient was down and in pain. As the EMTs arrived at the scene, Gregory could see the patient was black. And that’s when one of her colleagues groaned.”I think it was something like: ‘Oh, my God. Here we go again,’ ” Gregory says. She worried — then, as now — that because the patient was black, her colleague assumed he was acting out to get pain medication.”I am absolutely sure this was unconscious,” adds Gregory, who now lives and works in Portland, Ore. “At the time, I remember, it increased my stress as we rode up on this person. Because I thought, ‘Now am I going to have to fight my colleague for more pain medication, should that arise?’ “Unconscious bias can be subtle — but, as this new report shows, it may be one of factors behind race-linked health disparities seen across the U.S.The study looked at 104,000 medical charts of ambulance patients between 2015 and 2017. It found minority patients were less likely to receive morphine and other pain medication compared with white patients — regardless of socioeconomic factors, such as health insurance status.Gregory is now a physician assistant, and one of her current patients, a black veteran, has cyclic vomiting syndrome. That means he periodically experiences bouts of vomiting he can’t stop without hydromorphone, a potent opioid.If the man doesn’t get the medicine when he needs it, he could rupture his esophagus and die, Gregory says.So he doesn’t call the ambulance anymore. Instead, he goes straight to a hospital emergency department for help. But, Gregory says, the same thing keeps happening — the health professionals in the ER won’t prescribe him the medicine he needs.”I took his entire medical record and faxed it over to the emergency department director of a local hospital system, in anticipation of this very problem,” Gregory says. “And still, when he presented, it was the same exact thing.”During a shift change at American Medical Response headquarters in Portland, I discuss the problem with EMTs and paramedics who are getting their rigs ready for the next shift.Jennifer Sanders, who has been a paramedic for 30 years, tells me she has heard about the new study. She is adamant that her work is not affected by race.”I’ve never treated anybody different — regardless,” says Sanders.Most of the emergency responders I speak with, including Jason Dahlke, say race doesn’t affect the treatment they give. But Dahlke also says he and some of his co-workers are thinking deeply about unconscious bias.”Historically it’s the way this country has been,” Dahlke says. “In the beginning we had slavery and Jim Crow and redlining — and all of that stuff you can get lost in on a large, macro scale. Yeah. It’s there.”Ask Dahlke where he thinks unconscious bias could slip in, and he talks about a patient he just treated.The man was black and around 60 years old. Dahlke is white and in his 30s. The patient has diabetes and called 911 from home, complaining of extreme pain in his hands and feet.When Dahlke arrived at the patient’s house, he followed standard procedure and gave the patient a blood glucose test. The results showed that the man’s blood sugar level was low.”So it’s my decision to treat this blood sugar first. Make sure that number comes up,” Dahlke says.He gave the patient glucose — but no pain medicine.Dahlke says he did not address the man’s pain in this case because by the time he had stabilized the patient they had arrived at the hospital — where it was the responsibility of the emergency department staff to take over.”When people are acutely sick or injured, pain medication is important,” Dahlke says. “But it’s not the first thing we’re going to worry about. We’re going to worry about life threats. You’re not necessarily going to die from pain, and we’re going to do what satisfies the need in the moment to get you into the ambulance and to the hospital and to a higher level of care.”Dahlke says he is not sure whether, if the patient had been white, he would have administered pain medicine, though he doesn’t think so.”Is it something that I think about when I come across a patient that does not look like me? I don’t know that it changes my treatment,” he says.Asked whether treatment disparities might sometimes be a result of white people being more likely to ask for more medications, Dahlke smiles.”I wonder that — if, in this study, if we’re talking about people of color being denied or not given narcotic medicines as much as white people, then maybe we’re overtreating white people with narcotic medicines.”Research has also found African-Americans more likely to be deeply distrustful of the medical community, and that might play a role in diminished care, too. Such distrust is understandable and goes back generations, says Gregory.”How can a person of color not disrespect a system that is constantly studying and talking about these disparities, but does nothing to fix it?” she asks.Gregory wrote an open letter to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2015, asking it to declare racism a threat to public health.Past declarations of crisis — such as those focusing attention on problems such as smoking or HIV — have had significant results, Gregory notes.But the CDC told Gregory, in its emailed response, that while it supports government policies to combat racial discrimination and acknowledges the role of racism in health disparities, “racism and racial discrimination in health is a societal issue as well as a public health one, and one that requires a broad-based societal strategy to effectively dismantle racism and its negative impacts in the U.S.”Kennel says false stereotypes about race-based differences in physiology that date to slavery also play a role in health care disparities. For example, despite a lack of any supporting science, some medical professionals still think the blood of African-Americans coagulates faster, Kennel says, citing a recent study of medical students at the University of Virginia.Another question in the survey asked the students whether they thought African-Americans have fewer pain receptors than whites. “An uncomfortably large percentage of medical students said, ‘Yes, that’s true,’ ” says Kennel.On top of that, he says, EMTs and paramedics often work in time-pressured situations, where they are limited to ambiguous clinical information and scarce resources. “In these situations, providers are much more likely to default to making decisions [based] on stereotypes,” he says.Disparities in health care are well-documented. Whites tend to get better care and experience better outcomes, whether they’re in a doctor’s office or the ER. But before Kennel’s study, nobody knew whether the same was true in the back of an ambulance.And they nearly didn’t get to know, because the research required ambulance companies to release highly sensitive data.”We were prepared to maybe not look that great,” explains Robert McDonald, the operations manager at American Medical Response in Portland. AMR is one of the nation’s largest ambulance organizations, and it shared its data from more than 100,000 charts with Kennel.Some people chalk up the disparities he found to differences in demography and health insurance status, but Kennel says he controlled for those variables.So now that AMR knows about disparities in its care, what can the company do?”My feeling is we’re probably going to put some education and training out to our folks in the field,” McDonald says.In addition, he says, AMR is going to hire more people of color.”We want to see more ethnicities represented in EMS — which has historically been a white, male-dominated workforce,” McDonald says.AMR’s policies must change, too, he adds. The company has purchased software that will enable patients to read medical permission forms in any of 17 different languages. And the firm is planning an outreach effort to communities of color to explain the role of EMS workers.This story is part of NPR’s reporting partnership with Oregon Public Broadcasting and Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service of the Kaiser Family Foundation. KHN is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Copyright 2019 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.last_img read more

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