COVID-19: Stores, banks close at quiet Batam’s Hang Nadim Airport

first_imgSeveral stores and state-owned banks at Hang Nadim International Airport in Batam, Riau Islands province have ceased operating because of declining numbers of passengers during the COVID-19 pandemic.The director of the Hang Nadiem Airport Business Entity, Suwarso, said the lenders, namely Bank Mandiri, BRI and BNI, suspended their operations on Monday and they would remain closed until further notice.”A lot the banks’ customers are passengers from other regions who visit the bank right after they land. So to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the banks decided to stop operations temporarily,” Suwarso said. He said the banks initially would halt operations until March 31. However, after observing the current situation of the outbreak they decided to remain closed until further notice.Read also: COVID-19: Batam ferry terminal mulls suspending operations amid declining incomeBesides the banks, five outlets in the airport have also announced closures, while four other have requested leniency for paying their rent.”Several shops have asked for rent reductions; we’re currently discussing the matter,” Suwarso said. Before the outbreak, there were 52 flights in the airport per day carrying roughly 5,000 to 6,000 passengers to the island located close to the neighboring city-state of Singapore, but the flights were currently down to 30.“Each flight has a low load factor causing the number of passengers to plummeted to about 2,000 people per day. It was our lowest recorded [number of] passengers in the last 10 years,” he said.Suwarso said usually airlines requested additional flight schedules to airport authorities at about this time, considering the upcoming mass exodus after Ramadan during the Idul Fitri holiday. However, because of the COVID-19 outbreak none had filed such a request.”The airlines have not requested [additional flights]. I think flight reductions would be more probable in the future,” he said.Read also: Riau Islands governor calls for temporary closure of factories on Batam islandAgus, one of the porters in Hang Nadim airport, said the COVID-19 outbreak had directly affected his income.”There’s no passengers who want us to carry their suitcases and bags anymore. It looks like they don’t want to touch us,” Agus said.He explained that his daily income has been dropping drastically. He said he usually earned up to Rp 300,000 (US$18.43) per day, but that had dropped to only Rp 30,000 on his “lucky days” in the past weeks. (nal)Topics :last_img read more

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Wavell Heights’ elevation is becoming a big drawcard for buyers on the northside

first_imgInside 9 Deloraine St, Wavell HeightsMarketing specialist Tony McLoughlin, of Ashton Properties, said the home at 9 Deloraine St, Wavell Heights, went under contract three times before selling, with the first two falling through due to building and pest inspections. 9 Deloraine St, Wavell HeightsThis quality 1926 character Queenslander home has sold for $835,000. Inside 9 Deloraine St, Wavell HeightsMr McLaughlin said buyers were also attracted by the limited number of units in the suburb, however expressed that quality stock was low. Inside 9 Deloraine St, Wavell HeightsMore from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019“It’s an old Queenslander, so you have to expect wear and tear,” he said. “But that can scare people off a bit, and so was the case for this property. Mr McLoughlin said the market in Wavell Heights was performing extremely well. Inside 9 Deloraine St, Wavell HeightsHe said that a lot of homeowners in surrounding suburbs were moving to the area in order to gain city views at affordable prices. “The city views in Wavell Heights are pretty sought after,” he said.“We’re seeing a big shift from owners in Hamilton and Ascot moving here to get these views.“They’ll sell their million dollar property, come here and renovate and still have money left over.”last_img read more

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Modernising the game is all in the name

first_img2 Jul 2018 Modernising the game is all in the name Tags: Kenwick Park Golf Club, Women The women members of Kenwick Park Golf Club in Lincolnshire have taken a small, but significant, step to modernise the game.They’ve voted to change their name from Kenwick Park Ladies to Kenwick Park Women and are thought to be one of the first clubs in the UK to take this step.In a statement, the women’s section says: “The vote is much more than a name change. By adopting a modern attitude to language and equality, they (the women members) proved their willingness to continue to promote a more inclusive and forward thinking approach, to current and prospective members.“There was a real consensus amongst the members, that Kenwick Park should continue an already established drive, towards attracting and welcoming new women and girls, to the game of golf.“The name change has aligned Kenwick Park Golf Club to the approach taken by the ruling body of England Golf, and brings them into line with men’s golf, where the term ‘gentlemen’s golf’ died a death years ago.”Elaine Houlton, President of the women’s section, commented, “Exciting times are ahead heralded by the vote and yet in many ways, a gentle easing into change will be the reality.”It is not the first time Kenwick Park has been a trail blazer. In 1992 when it was opened, it was the first golf club in the area to give women golfers the same seven day playing rights as the men.England Golf’s strategy, Growing the Game of Golf in England, aims to attract more women and girl to the sport and to modernise the image of the game.Lauren Spray, England Golf Women and Girls’ Manager, congratulated the Kenwick Park women and said: “This may seem a small step but changes like this make a huge difference to the way the game is seen and make it much more attractive to the women and girls of today.”last_img read more

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