Habits of Grace: For Quiet Confidence

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Editor’s note: Presiding Bishop Michael Curry is offering Habits of Grace, a weekly meditation to help Episcopalians cope during the COVID-19 pandemic. “As we learn how to adjust our lives given the reality of the coronavirus and the request to do our part to slow its spread by practicing physical distancing, I invite you to join me each week to take a moment to cultivate a ‘habit of grace.’ A new video meditation will be posted on Mondays through June.” — Presiding Bishop Michael CurryJune 5, 2020: For Quiet ConfidenceI had intended to do our Habits of Grace earlier this week on Monday or Tuesday, as I usually do, and then so many things began to happen, both in our country and in our wider world that I wasn’t able to get to it.In the midst of all that was going on, there were a few moments when so much was happening so fast and it was so chaotic, that at one point, I was on a Zoom call with a member of our staff and we were working on videos and interviews and it was so much and so chaotic, I remember just saying, “Let’s just stop, and pray.”And the prayer I prayed was a prayer from our prayer book. It’s toward the end of the prayer book on page 832 called “For Quiet Confidence”. This prayer is based on a time in the life of the prophet Isaiah, when the people of Judah and Jerusalem were living in a time when their country was in turmoil and things were uncertain and chaos seemed to be ruling.The prophet Isaiah said, “You must remember that it is in returning and rest, that you will be saved; in quietness and confidence, you will find your strength.” And this is the prayer we prayed and I offer it for all of us. Let us pray:Oh, God of peace, who has taught us that in returning and in rest, we shall be saved; in quietness and in confidence shall be our strength. By the might of thy Spirit, lift us, we pray thee to thy presence, where we may be still and know that thou art God, through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.God love you and keep the faith.Hábitos de gracia, 5 de junio de 2020: una invitación para ti, del obispo primado CurryJune 5, 2020Mientras aprendemos a ajustar nuestras vidas dada la realidad del coronavirus y atendemos la solicitud de hacer nuestra parte para frenar su propagación practicando el distanciamiento social, les invito a que se unan a mí cada semana para dedicar un momento a cultivar un «hábito de gracia».  Una nueva meditación se  publicará todas las semanas durante el mes de junio. Estas meditaciones pueden verse en cualquier momento haciendo clic aquí.5 de junio de 2020: Por confianza y tranquilidadTenía la intención de hacer nuestros Hábitos de Gracia a principios de esta semana, el lunes o el martes, como lo hago habitualmente, y luego comenzaron a suceder tantas cosas, tanto en nuestro país como en nuestro mundo en general, que no pude lograrlo.En medio de todo lo que estaba pasando, hubo algunos momentos en los que estaban sucediendo tantas cosas con tanta rapidez, y era tan caótico, que en un momento, en medio de una llamada de Zoom con un miembro de nuestro personal y trabajando en videos y entrevistas, y era tan intenso y caótico que recuerdo haber dicho, «Detengámonos y oremos».Y la oración que recé fue una oración de nuestro Libro de Oración. Está hacia el final del Libro de Oración en la página 723 y se titula «Por confianza y tranquilidad». Esta oración se basa en un momento de la vida del profeta Isaías, cuando el pueblo de Judá y Jerusalén vivían en una época en que su país estaba en crisis y las cosas eran inciertas y parecía que imperaba el caos.El profeta Isaías dijo: «En el arrepentimiento y la calma está tu salvación, en la serenidad y la confianza está tu fuerza». Y esta es la oración que ofrezco por todos nosotros. Oremos:Oh Dios de paz, tú nos has enseñado que en la conversión y entrega seremos salvos, y en la tranquilidad y confianza estará nuestra Fortaleza: Por el poder de tu Espíritu, te suplicamos nos eleves a tu presencia, en donde podamos estar quietos y saber que tú eres Dios; por Jesucristo nuestro Señor. AménDios les ama y les guarde en la fe. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Habits of Grace, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Habits of Grace: For Quiet Confidence Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Church Office of Public AffairsPosted Jun 5, 2020 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Back to Press Releases Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

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Controlled burns coming to Apopka

first_img Mama Mia Mama Mia TAGSKelly ParkOrange County Parks and RecreationPrescribed BurnsRock Springs Run Previous articleSummer Olympics Medal Count UpdateNext articleDelta Airlines: Delays and Cancellation Update Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR August 8, 2016 at 11:46 am LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Reply Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Again and again more and more “prescribed burns” never ever ending to the same general areas. This is suppose to increase wildlife according to the article? No, it will run the wildlife out of there into subdivisions where there will be increased nuisance calls about bears to justify their next planned bear hunt next year! They are not fooling me. If you were down in those areas hanging out and living, and the fires started and started sweeping across the forests, would that be good for you? There will be wildlife that suffers burns and death from the fires, don’t be deceived, and believe the government’s scientific double talk. Also the agencies don’t have regard for the humans who can’t hardly breathe from the smoke and fires, plus their eyes that burn. The smoke danger for those on the roads while driving. Helen Mama Mia 4 COMMENTS Reply center_img Reply August 8, 2016 at 9:05 pm Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 I wonder if this is absolutely necessary. The burns instigate severe asthma attacks for me….and I am sure for many others. Is the human factor ever considered when they make these decisions? Please think of all the residents suffering from these burns. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 The headlines states, “Controlled burns coming to Apopka”……they have already been coming to Apopka, over and over, again and again, and THAT is the problem! Orange County planning prescribed burnsFrom The Orange County websiteWith the goal of preventing future catastrophic wildfires while maintaining natural ecological systems, land managers with the Orange County Parks and Recreation Division are planning to perform prescribed burns within Kelly Park (Rock Springs Run), weather pending, within the next two weeks.County lands are managed as natural areas and periodic fires are needed to keep the systems in good condition. Fire is a natural and important ecological force, which has shaped these properties over time. Plants and animals that live in these systems are adapted to and depend upon periodic fires for their continued survival.Benefits of prescribed burning include the removal of accumulated fuels; the increase of wildlife and wildflowers; and the restoration of scenic vistas as undergrowth is reduced.Land managers need a narrow range of weather conditions outlined in park-specific fire prescriptions in order to burn. These prescriptions consider such things as ground moisture, humidity, wind speed, wind direction and the ability of the atmosphere to carry smoke harmlessly away from the area. The Florida Forest Service must agree with fire prescriptions and issue permits to allow prescribed fire.For more information regarding these burns, please contact Mandy K. Zimmer, the Public Relations Officer for Orange County Parks and Recreation at 407-836-6257 or go here. Reply August 8, 2016 at 11:49 am August 9, 2016 at 6:20 am You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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OCPS Superintendent wins award

first_img Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSDr. Barbara JenkinsOrange County Public Schools Previous articleDexter Hughley shooting suspect arrestedNext articleTrader Joe’s Recalls Hummus Due to Listeria Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014  Barbara Jenkins is Florida’s Superintendent of the YearFrom Orange County Public Schools Dr. Barbara Jenkins was named Florida’s 2017 Superintendent of the Year, at the Florida Association of District School Superintendents (FADSS) and Florida School Board Association (FSBA) joint conference this week in Tampa.Jenkins was named superintendent for Orange County Public Schools in 2012.“I am honored to represent the fine superintendents of Florida,” said Jenkins. “I am also extremely grateful for a phenomenal school board, talented leadership team, outstanding principals and teachers, and OCPS team members who lead our students to success every day.”Under Jenkins’ leadership, the district won the prestigious 2014 Broad Prize for Urban Education. The prize earned $500,000 for student scholarships from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation. The district also received the Governor’s Sterling Award in 2014 and again in 2015. The award is highly regarded for its recognition of organizations that exemplify performance excellence in Florida. Also, for three of the last five years, OCPS was named to the AP District Honor Roll by the College Board, for increasing access to Advanced Placement course work, while simultaneously maintaining or increasing the percentage of students earning exam scores for college credit.Jenkins serves on the boards of United Arts of Central Florida, Winter Park Health Foundation, Greater Orlando Economic Development Commission, Florida Hospital, Central Florida Regional Commission on Homelessness, Orange County Youth Mental Health Commission, and is a member of the Aspen Urban Superintendent’s Network.The process for electing Florida’s Superintendent of the Year was established by the American Association of School Administrators (AASA), a national organization of school superintendents and other educational leaders. In March 2017, Jenkins will represent all Florida superintendents at the AASA’s National Education Conference in New Orleans, LA where she will be recognized and honored for her public education service in Florida. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Biggest Apopka stories of 2016: Standoff at Apopka CVS

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! TAGSOrange County Sheriff’s OfficeStandoff Previous articleBiggest Apopka stories of 2016: Black Lives Matter comes to townNext articleBiggest Apopka Stories of 2016: A 9/11 memorial to remember Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Editor’s Note: This is the 10th in a series of articles published by The Apopka Voice in 2016 that were the most noteworthy events of the year. The Apopka Voice will publish them starting Monday, December 26th and running until Sunday, January 1st. On January, 2nd we will publish a poll and let the readers decide on which story is the most impactful of the year. Traffic is blocked for hours on SR436 and Wekiva Springs RoadsOriginally Published: August 13th, 2016It was supposed to be a very different day in the greater Apopka area. The sun was shining, traffic was steady, and there wasn’t a cloud in the sky. However the last weekend before children return to school in Apopka took an unexpected turn at 9:30 AM, when the Orange County Sheriff’s Office responded to a 911 emergency call in reference to a man with a gun and possible explosive devices at the CVS Drugstore on the intersections of State Road 436 and Wekiva Springs Boulevard.According to Deputy Rose Silva, the Public Information Officer of the OCSO, deputies located a black male with multiple firearms in the CVS parking lot upon arrival. He was later identified as Charles Warren Jr., 50, of Apopka.Deputies evacuated the store as they attempted to communicate with Warren. The Orange County SWAT Unit was also dispatched. Deputies attempted to negotiate with Warren, who made no threats and who had injured no one, but was mostly non-responsive to them according to Silva.A later investigation revealed Warren is known to the area and is mentally disabled.After nearly five hours, deputies saw Warren on the sidewalk and called out to him, but he did not respond to their commands. SWAT deputies shot Warren with two nonlethal soft rounds sometimes called “bean bags” and restrained him, according to Silva. Deputies took Warren into custody and transported him to Florida South for mental and physical evaluation. Warren did not suffer any injuries.Deputies recovered a BB gun from Warren’s waistband, and no explosive devices were found at the scene.The OCSO did not arrest or charge Warren “because there was no intention behind it,” according to Silva.The incident took over five hours to resolve and blocked traffic to two major intersections that are arteries to and from Apopka, Altamonte Springs, Longwood, Orlando, and the Wekiva Springs communities.Multiple agencies including the Apopka Police Department, the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office, the Florida Highway Patrol, and the Orange County Fire and Rescue responded to assist in the standoff. Please enter your name here You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Community Health Centers named Top 100 for working families

first_img Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSCommunity Health Centers Previous articleAPD Arrest ReportNext articleComing to Netflix in September Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here  from chcfl.orgCommunity Health Centers was, recently, selected as one of the 2017 Orlando Sentinel Top 100 Companies for Working Families. The list of “Top 100 Companies” was created by the Orlando Sentinel and Best Companies Group.  This is the second consecutive year that the organization has been recognized as a Top 100 Company. There are three locations in Apopka that provide dental, family. OB/GYN and pediatric care. Florida Hospital gifted CHC/ Apopka the location in May of 2017.This survey and award program was designed to identify, recognize and honor the best places of employment in Orlando, benefiting the region’s economy, its work force and businesses.For consideration, companies had to fulfill the following eligibility requirements: Be a for-profit or not-for-profit business or government entity;Florida Hospital gifted CHC the location in May of 2017. Be a publicly or privately held business;Have a facility in Central Florida (Brevard, Flagler, Lake, Marion, Orange, Osceola, Polk, Seminole, Sumter and Volusia County); Have at least 15 employees working in Central Florida; Must be in business a minimum of one year.Organizations from across Central Florida entered the two-part survey process to determine the Orlando Sentinel Top 100 Companies. The first part consisted of evaluating each nominated company’s workplace policies, practices, philosophy, systems, and demographics. The second part consisted of an employee survey to measure the employee experience. The combined scores determined the top organizations and the final ranking. Best Companies Group managed the overall registration, survey, and analysis process and determined the final rankings.Community Health Centers, with 485 employees in Central Florida, was recognized in the companies with 100-499 employees category.  For more information on the Orlando Sentinel Top 100 Companies program, visit www.Top100CompaniesORL.com.Community Health Centers, Inc., (CHC) provides quality and compassionate primary health care services to insured, uninsured, underinsured, and underserved children and adults in Central Florida. CHC accepts Medicaid, Medicare and most private insurance plans. A Sliding Discount Program is available for those with or without insurance. CHC provides care to more than 62,000 patients each year in the Apopka, Bithlo, Forest City, Lake Ellenor, Leesburg, Meadow Woods, Pine Hills, South Lake, Tavares and Winter Garden communities.www.chcfl.org Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

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In case you missed it: The Apopka week in review

first_img That next we may see some seaplanes dropping and delivering medical marijuana………LOL Five Stories that shaped Apopka’s week:Alonzo Williams Park getting a new community centerApopka garbage truck catches fireCity Council doubles down on medical cannabis moratoriumCity Attorney: Community Trust more appropriate for Gospel music festivalApopka police apprehend juveniles on a crime spree TAGSWeek in Review Previous articleTalking turkey: It’s platter seasonNext articleShare a Meal and Fight Childhood Hunger Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Mama Mia November 20, 2016 at 11:28 am November 20, 2016 at 11:39 am That the City of Apopka now may be the Marijuana Capital of the World, formerly the Bird Capital of the World…………and formerly the Fast Food Capital, and Indoor Foliage Capital of the World………… Reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 November 20, 2016 at 11:36 am Mama Mia Please enter your name here November 20, 2016 at 11:37 am That yes, it does snow in Florida……….just look at the garbage truck fire photos……………. Reply Mama Mia November 20, 2016 at 11:41 am And that a Lake County Commissioner thinks COA should own Lake Apopka and take on full ownership responsibility and clean-up………. Reply And that we have some long lasting nighttime COA council meetings……….bring your pillow and nap sack if you plan on attending……….. Mama Miacenter_img Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here That Apopka was the Foliage Capital of the World formerly, then the Fast Food Capital of the World, then the Bird Observing Capital of the World, and now could become the Marijuana Capital of the World……..LOL Mama Mia That yes, Virginia, it does snow in Apopka…………. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate 7 COMMENTS Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. November 20, 2016 at 11:33 am Reply Please enter your comment! Mama Mia The Anatomy of Fear Reply November 20, 2016 at 11:29 am Mama Mialast_img read more

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Memorial Day: Cookouts, family gatherings… trip to the ER?

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSEmergency RoomMemorial Day Previous articleMermaid memories of a rainy and productive “build day”Next articleLake Apopka wildlife drive open on Memorial Day Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 For many, Memorial Day weekend means cookouts, family gatherings and fun in the sun. Despite the excitement surrounding the “unofficial start of summer,” many accidents occur, and several hospitals in Florida are experiencing longer waits, which could increase over the busy holiday weekend.Accidents often happen due to distractions while preparing food or from poor food handling, such as leaving perishable ingredients out in the sun for too long. Avocado hand has gained some attention in the news and social media recently with many people suffering injuries from cutting through this popular fruit. These accidents serve as a reminder to use care when preparing food, especially during the busy holiday weekend.MedExpress, a neighborhood medical center with 22 locations in Florida, offers a full medical team and is available to treat anyone who has suffered a cut, burn or has a food-borne illness over Memorial Day weekend. Medical experts suggest following these safety practices for an injury and illness-free holiday weekend:Never hold a food item when slicing down, or into itKeep knives sharp, as dull knives are more likely to slip when cuttingKeep young children at least three feet away from the grill area while it is in useFor the past four years, MedExpress has consistently seen an increase in patient visits the day after Memorial Day, specifically for lacerations as well as muscular and skeletal injuries. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more

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Juneteenth: The end of slavery in the United States

first_img Please enter your comment! June 19, 2017 at 6:06 pm Please enter your name here Fannie Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate 1 COMMENT Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twittercenter_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States.  Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with the news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.Later attempts to explain this two and a half year delay in the receipt of this important news have yielded several versions that have been handed down through the years. Often told is the story of a messenger who was murdered on his way to Texas with the news of freedom. Another is that the news was deliberately withheld by the enslavers to maintain the labor force on the plantations. And still, another, is that federal troops actually waited for the slave owners to reap the benefits of one last cotton harvest before going to Texas to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation. All of which or neither of this version could be true. Certainly, for some, President Lincoln’s authority over the rebellious states was in question   For whatever the reasons, conditions in Texas remained status quo well beyond what was statutory.General Order Number 3One of General Granger’s first orders of business was to read to the people of Texas, General Order Number 3 which began most significantly with:“The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and free laborer.”The reactions to this profound news ranged from pure shock to immediate jubilation. While many lingered to learn of this new employer to employee relationship, many left before these offers were completely off the lips of their former ‘masters’ – attesting to the varying conditions on the plantations and the realization of freedom. Even with nowhere to go, many felt that leaving the plantation would be their first grasp of freedom. North was a logical destination and for many, it represented true freedom, while the desire to reach family members in neighboring states drove the some into Louisiana, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. Settling into these new areas as free men and women brought on new realities and the challenges of establishing a heretofore non-existent status for black people in America. Recounting the memories of that great day in June of 1865 and its festivities would serve as motivation as well as a release from the growing pressures encountered in their new territory. The celebration of June 19th was coined “Juneteenth” and grew with more participation from descendants. The Juneteenth celebration was a time for reassuring each other, for praying and for gathering remaining family members. Juneteenth continued to be highly revered in Texas decades later, with many former slaves and descendants making an annual pilgrimage back to Galveston on this date.Juneteenth Festivities and FoodA range of activities was provided to entertain the masses, many of which continue in tradition today. Rodeos, fishing, barbecuing and baseball are just a few of the typical Juneteenth activities you may witness today. Juneteenth almost always focused on education and self-improvement. Thus, often guest speakers are brought in and the elders are called upon to recount the events of the past. Prayer services were also a major part of these celebrations.Juneteenth In Modern TimesToday, Juneteenth is enjoying a phenomenal growth rate within communities and organizations throughout the country. Institutions such as the Smithsonian, the Henry Ford Museum and others have begun sponsoring Juneteenth-centered activities. In recent years, a number of local and national Juneteenth organizations have arisen to take their place alongside older organizations – all with the mission to promote and cultivate knowledge and appreciation of African-American history and culture.Juneteenth today, celebrates African American freedom and achievement while encouraging continuous self-development and respect for all cultures. As it takes on a more national, symbolic and even global perspective, the events of 1865 in Texas are not forgotten, for all of the roots tie back to this fertile soil from which a national day of pride is growing.The future of Juneteenth looks bright as the number of cities and states creating Juneteenth committees continues to increase. Respect and appreciation for all of our differences grow out of exposure and working together. Getting involved and supporting Juneteenth celebrations creates new bonds of friendship and understanding among us. This indeed brightens our future – and that is the Spirit of Juneteenth. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply I appreciate the Apopka Voice sharing this important history. I recall the beautiful Juneteenth celebrations, as a child…Communities united for grand affairs with an assortment of foods, music, and prayer. The Anatomy of Fear You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSJuneteenth Previous article5 Hacks for Shopping at Nordstrom RackNext articleBreaking News: Barricaded suspect apprehended in Winter Garden Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Apopka Burglary Report

first_img9/16/2019 7:45 amVEHICLE4400 BLOCK BERRY OAK DR  Apopka Police Department Burglary Report: Week Ending September 21stThe Apopka Burglary Report for the week ending September 21st shows 16 burglaries reported in Apopka.Chief Michael McKinley of the Apopka Police Department tells us that many vehicle burglaries could have been prevented if everyone remembers to do just two things:Remove all valuables from your vehicleLock your car doorsThe breakdown of the burglaries reported to the Apopka Police Department last week:1 – Business2 – Residential13 – VehicleHere is a list of the burglaries, along with their date, time, type, and location: 9/18/2019 3:31 amVEHICLE2000 RED BLUFF AVE  You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here 9/15/2019 3:16 pmBUSINESS1700 BLOCK ROCK SPRINGS RD  9/18/2019 3:42 amVEHICLE1700 BLOCK WATER ROCK DR  9/15/2019 11:57 amVEHICLE1100 BLOCK SHEELER HILLS DR  9/18/2019 3:43 amVEHICLE1700 BLOCK WATER ROCK DR  Please enter your name here 9/18/2019 3:12 amVEHICLE1900 MEADOW CREST DR  DATE/TIMETYPELOCATION The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 9/18/2019 11:03 amVEHICLE1500 BLOCK ROCK SPRINGS RD  Share on Facebook Tweet on Twittercenter_img Please enter your comment! 9/15/2019 9:20 pmRESIDENCE400 BLOCK PLYMOUTH ROCK PL  9/18/2019 4:06 pmRESIDENCE12600 BLOCK MT LOGAN DR  Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate 9/18/2019 3:39 amVEHICLE1700 BLOCK BELLE CHASE DR  9/19/2019 12:00 midnightVEHICLE700 BLOCK DACOMA CT  9/16/2019 7:39 amVEHICLE4300 BLOCK MARIGOLD ISLE AVE  TAGSApopka Burglary ReportApopka Police DepartmentBusiness Burglary ReportResidential Burglary ReportVehicle Burglary Report Previous articleAnatomy of an investigation: The case that rocked the Apopka Fire Department – Part TwoNext articleApopka realtor wins $1,000 donation for local charity Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 9/17/2019 8:10 amVEHICLE4500 BLOCK REDONDO LN  9/18/2019 3:44 amVEHICLE1700 BLOCK WATER ROCK DR  9/20/2019 8:05 amVEHICLE1400 BLOCK FALCONCREST BLVD  LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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There was a time reparations were actually paid out – just…

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter 1 COMMENT You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSBlack AmericansDebtDescendantsEnslavedhistoryRacismReparationsSlave OwnersSlaverySlavesThe Conversation Previous articleCity Council green lights pursuit of Camp Wewa purchase for ApopkaNext articleWhat are the origins of Lent? Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply By Thomas Craemer, Associate Professor of Public Policy, University of ConnecticutThe cost of slavery and its legacy of systemic racism to generations of Black Americans has been clear over the past year – seen in both the racial disparities of the pandemic and widespread protests over police brutality.Yet whenever calls for reparations are made – as they are again now – opponents counter that it would be unfair to saddle a debt on those not personally responsible. In the words of then-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, speaking on Juneteenth – the day Black Americans celebrate as marking emancipation – in 2019, “I don’t think reparations for something that happened 150 years ago for whom none of us currently living are responsible is a good idea.”As a professor of public policy who has studied reparations, I acknowledge that the figures involved are large – I conservatively estimate the losses from unpaid wages and lost inheritances to Black descendants of the enslaved at around US$20 trillion in 2021 dollars.But what often gets forgotten by those who oppose reparations is that payouts for slavery have been made before – numerous times, in fact. And few at the time complained that it was unfair to saddle generations of people with a debt for which they were not personally responsible.There is an important caveat in these cases of reparations though: The payments went to former slave owners and their descendants, not the enslaved or their legal heirs.Extorting HaitiA prominent example is the so-called “Haitian Independence Debt” that saddled revolutionary Haiti with reparation payments to former slave owners in France.Haitians had to pay for their independence. API/Gamma-Rapho via Getty ImagesHaiti declared independence from France in 1804, but the former colonial power refused to acknowledge the fact for another 20 years. Then in 1825, King Charles X decreed that he would recognize independence, but at a cost. The price tag would be 150 million francs – more than 10 years of the Haitian government’s entire revenue. The money, the French said, was needed to compensate former slave owners for the loss of what was deemed their property.By 1883, Haiti had paid off some 90 million francs in reparations. But to finance such huge payments, Haiti had to borrow 166 million francs with the French banks Ternaux Grandolpe et Cie and Lafitte Rothschild Lapanonze. Loan interests and fees added to the overall sum owed to France.The payments ran for a total of 122 years from 1825 to 1947, with the money going to more than 7,900 former slave owners and their descendants in France. By the time the payments ended, none of the originally enslaved or enslavers were still alive.British ‘reparations’French slave owners weren’t the only ones to receive payment for lost revenue, their British counterparts did too – but this time from their own government.The British government paid reparations totaling £20 million (equivalent to some £300 billion in 2018) to slave owners when it abolished slavery in 1833. Banking magnates Nathan Mayer Rothschild and his brother-in-law Moses Montefiore arranged for a loan to the government of $15 million to cover the vast sum – which represented almost half of the U.K. government’s annual expenditure.The U.K. serviced those loans for 182 years from 1833 to 2015. The authors of the British reparations program saddled many generations of British people with a reparations debt for which they were not personally responsible.Paying for freedomIn the United States, reparations to slave owners in Washington, D.C., were paid at the height of the Civil War. On April 16, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the “Act for the Release of certain Persons held to Service or Labor within the District of Columbia” into law.It gave former slave owners $300 per enslaved person set free. More than 3,100 enslaved people saw their freedom paid for in this way, for a total cost in excess of $930,000 – almost $25 million in today’s money.In contrast, the formerly enslaved received nothing if they decided to stay in the United States. The act provided for an emigration incentive of $100 – around $2,683 in 2021 dollars – if the former enslaved agreed to permanently leave the United States.Similar examples of reparations going to individual slave owners can be found in the records of countries including Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden, as well as Argentina, Colombia, Paraguay, Venezuela, Peru and Brazil.The French government even set an example on how the government can conduct genealogical research to determine eligible recipients. It compiled a massive six-volume compendium in 1828, listing some 7,900 original slave owners in Saint Domingue and their French descendants.Reparations, this time the other way round …Blessed with detailed U.S. Census records and local archives, I believe the government could do the same for the Black descendants of enslaved Americans.In the 1860 census, the last one before the Civil War, the government counted 3,853,760 enslaved people in the United States. Their direct descendants live among close to 50 million Black residents in the United States today.Using historic census records to estimate the number of man-, woman-, and child-hours available to slave owners from 1776 to 1860, I estimated how much money the enslaved lost considering the meager wages for unskilled labor at the time, which ranged from 2 cents in 1790 to 8 cents in 1860. At a very moderate interest rate of 3%, I arrived at an estimate of $20.3 trillion in 2021 dollars for the total losses to Black descendants of enslaved Americans living today.It is a huge sum – roughly one year’s worth of the U.S.‘s GDP – but a figure that would comfortably close the racial wealth gap. The difference is, in contrast to historical precedents, this time the benefits would go to the Black descendants of the enslaved, not to enslavers and their offspring.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. No guessing who in this 1864 depiction may have been compensated after slavery ended. API/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images OMG, another woke academic using a false pretense to make a pc sjw argument for reparations using actions from 150 years ago. Trying to conflate “both the racial disparities of the pandemic and widespread protests over police brutality.” as proof of “systemic racism” is a load of garbage. 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